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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Okra isn't the first (or seventh) vegetable most people think to buy when they go to the farmers' market. Known primarily for its use in heavy Southern dishes and infamously for its ability to become slimy because of its natural mucilage, okra isn't flying off the stands. The way to keep the slime factor down with okra is to cook it for a long time (like in gumbo) or a short time (like in a stir fry). But why cook it at all? I prefer to pickle okra. Processed this way, the okra stays crisp, tastes great and, more important, no slime.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 12, 2013
It's Fat Tuesday and many of us are going to indulge in rich gumbos, savory jambalayas and sweet beignets in honor of the occasion. Eating healthy may seem fruitless on a day devoted to high-calorie, rich foods. But there are ways to make healthier versions of our favorite Fat Tuesday dishes. Eatingwell.com offers this healthy sausage gumbo recipe. Ingredients 12 ounces hot Italian turkey sausage links, removed from casings 2 teaspoons canola oil 1 large onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 cups chopped tomatoes 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 1/2 cups frozen chopped okra 3/4 cup instant brown rice 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and sliced (optional)
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NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 6, 2006
A hot summer spells good news for okra. Although the harvest arrived later than usual this year, the pods recently appeared in farmers' markets. Those of us who love the vegetable celebrated by pulling out skillets and saucepans to begin cooking immediately. Okra is delicious fried in a light cornmeal batter. But that is just the beginning for true okra fans. During the short time it's fresh and available, we've been known to serve it frequently in a variety of dishes that may include stews, soups and gumbos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Okra isn't the first (or seventh) vegetable most people think to buy when they go to the farmers' market. Known primarily for its use in heavy Southern dishes and infamously for its ability to become slimy because of its natural mucilage, okra isn't flying off the stands. The way to keep the slime factor down with okra is to cook it for a long time (like in gumbo) or a short time (like in a stir fry). But why cook it at all? I prefer to pickle okra. Processed this way, the okra stays crisp, tastes great and, more important, no slime.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
Fresh and fuzzy green okra, right out of your garden or the produce market, can become a pickle to remember, even in a martini.A request for the recipe came from C. Bryant of Hawesville, Ky. whose answer came from A. T. Castleberry of Longview, Wash., who wrote "I may live in Washington state but I was born and raised in Arkansas and I love okra in any form."Castleberry's pickled okraMakes 10 pints4 1/2 pounds okra, small or medium8 cups cider vinegar1 cup water1/2 cup salt10 cloves of garlic, peeled10 hot red peppers10 teaspoons dill seed10 teaspoons mustard seedWash okra and brush lightly with a piece of nylon net or brush to remove the fuzz.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Christine Mengel of Birdsboro, Pa., wrote seeking a recipe "called limping Susan, which, if memory serves me correctly, is a main dish with seafood. I saw it in the Atlanta Constitution in 1991." Beth Hunter of Timonium responded: "I hope your readers like this as much as we do." Recipe requests Regina A. Hatch of Bloomery, W.Va., writes that she is 75 and had a recipe for a Boston brown bread that she has lost. "I am a native New Yorker who moved south to the mountains of West Virginia 15 years ago and am now nostalgic for things of my past."
NEWS
By Jess Webb | February 18, 1996
MART, Texas -- Morning sunlight streamed through the window and washed over the hardwood floor as I entered the kitchen to fill my coffee cup. It was one of those cool mornings when the world looked new. I bounced lightly across the room singing."
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | August 7, 2005
My grandparents were born and raised on large successful farms in South Carolina. Then came the boll weevil infestation in the 1930s, wiping out crops and hopes. My grandfather joined the great Northern migration working his way up the East Coast, finding jobs on the docks, eventually settling in Connecticut. Mamie and Rufus Vaughn adjusted to life in New England, but held fast to their love of Southern foods. Grits and country ham, homemade biscuits and cornbread, rice and butter beans, collard and turnip greens, fresh tomatoes and peppers and that all-time Southern favorite: okra.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
660 CURRIES The Gateway to Indian Cooking By Raghavan Iyer Workman Publishing / 2008 / $22.95 Think curry dishes are limited to the menu items at your local Indian restaurant? Raghavan Iyer urges you to broaden your definition to any preparation of meat, fish, poultry, legumes, vegetables or fruit that is simmered or smothered in a fragrant gravy or sauce. Move over, plain yellow powders and pastes. There's a treasure-trove of Indian recipes here, both authentic and experimental. "Contemporary curries" is the most unusual section, melding Iyer's native cuisine with Western cooking techniques.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | December 21, 1994
The model for the Kwanzaa Karamu is taken from the image of an African village after a bountiful harvest when all members of the community bring their produce together and create a feast. One person brings yams, another black-eyed peas or chicken and yet another peanuts. Feasting on foods contributed by each member of the community or family recognizes unity, cooperative economics, collective work and responsibility within2 The next recipe is from Heart & Soul magazine.Collard Greens with OkraServes 62 pounds fresh collard greens or 20 ounces frozen collards2 teaspoons corn oil2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage or rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried1/2 cup chopped scallions1/4 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or to taste)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
Khalid Chaudry won't give up the recipes behind the food at his new Mount Vernon restaurant, Alladin Kabob. When pressed about the magic behind the meat samosas, or the sprinkle of red powder on a lemon sitting atop a small salad, the restaurant's owner demurred. "Those are our spices," he said. "It's our secret. " Whatever those secret spice combinations are, they work. Alladin Kabob's menu stretches across the Middle East and through India, with a few American dishes thrown into the mix. Regardless of point of origin, Chaudry's food is expertly seasoned.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
660 CURRIES The Gateway to Indian Cooking By Raghavan Iyer Workman Publishing / 2008 / $22.95 Think curry dishes are limited to the menu items at your local Indian restaurant? Raghavan Iyer urges you to broaden your definition to any preparation of meat, fish, poultry, legumes, vegetables or fruit that is simmered or smothered in a fragrant gravy or sauce. Move over, plain yellow powders and pastes. There's a treasure-trove of Indian recipes here, both authentic and experimental. "Contemporary curries" is the most unusual section, melding Iyer's native cuisine with Western cooking techniques.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 6, 2006
A hot summer spells good news for okra. Although the harvest arrived later than usual this year, the pods recently appeared in farmers' markets. Those of us who love the vegetable celebrated by pulling out skillets and saucepans to begin cooking immediately. Okra is delicious fried in a light cornmeal batter. But that is just the beginning for true okra fans. During the short time it's fresh and available, we've been known to serve it frequently in a variety of dishes that may include stews, soups and gumbos.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | August 7, 2005
My grandparents were born and raised on large successful farms in South Carolina. Then came the boll weevil infestation in the 1930s, wiping out crops and hopes. My grandfather joined the great Northern migration working his way up the East Coast, finding jobs on the docks, eventually settling in Connecticut. Mamie and Rufus Vaughn adjusted to life in New England, but held fast to their love of Southern foods. Grits and country ham, homemade biscuits and cornbread, rice and butter beans, collard and turnip greens, fresh tomatoes and peppers and that all-time Southern favorite: okra.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 2005
Canned tomatoes and frozen sliced okra offer shortcuts to success by adding a colorful flavor boost to this comfort soup. Using a between-season lineup of vegetables available now in the produce section, this hearty dinner satisfies while we await spring vegetables. Substitute tilapia or red snapper fillets if you don't have a taste for catfish, and call it seafood soup. Tip Buy shredded cabbage from the supermarket to save chopping time. Catfish Soup Preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes Makes 8 servings 4 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 each, quartered: small red onion, ribs celery 1 carrot, quartered 2 cloves garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | August 26, 1998
Grocery to open in '99 in old Pikes TheaterDiPasquale's Market Place, the new art deco Italian grocery and 80-seat deli in the old Pikes Theater in Pikesville, is now scheduled to open in early '99. Look for lots of produce, prepared foods and a separate area for demonstrations by local chefs and food specialists.Summer side dish: a medley of veggiesMake the most of late- summer produce with this easy side dish. Serve it with cold chicken or hamburgers for a complete meal.Summer MedleyServes 41 tablespoon butter1 green pepper, cut into thin strips1 green onion, chopped2 medium tomatoes, peeled and chopped12 okra (can use frozen)
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Margaret S. Waring of Baltimore requested a recipe for Chicken Gumbo Soup. Her response came from Vivian Offutt in Bel Air, who wrote, "This recipe came from a very old cookbook that I have that dates back to about the 1940s. Hope this is what she wanted. "If desired, add 2 quarts of peeled and diced tomatoes, in which case reduce the water by half." Recipe requests Rose Henry of Columbia writes: "I hope you can help me find a lost recipe for Spanish rice. It was in Woman's World magazine, possibly about 1997 or '98. The magazine couldn't help and copies were not in the library, so you are my last resort.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Margaret S. Waring of Baltimore requested a recipe for Chicken Gumbo Soup. Her response came from Vivian Offutt in Bel Air, who wrote, "This recipe came from a very old cookbook that I have that dates back to about the 1940s. Hope this is what she wanted. "If desired, add 2 quarts of peeled and diced tomatoes, in which case reduce the water by half." Recipe requests Rose Henry of Columbia writes: "I hope you can help me find a lost recipe for Spanish rice. It was in Woman's World magazine, possibly about 1997 or '98. The magazine couldn't help and copies were not in the library, so you are my last resort.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Christine Mengel of Birdsboro, Pa., wrote seeking a recipe "called limping Susan, which, if memory serves me correctly, is a main dish with seafood. I saw it in the Atlanta Constitution in 1991." Beth Hunter of Timonium responded: "I hope your readers like this as much as we do." Recipe requests Regina A. Hatch of Bloomery, W.Va., writes that she is 75 and had a recipe for a Boston brown bread that she has lost. "I am a native New Yorker who moved south to the mountains of West Virginia 15 years ago and am now nostalgic for things of my past."
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