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Oklahoma City Bombing

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December 30, 1997
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
For a long time, the people of Oklahoma City knew it was coming -- the day that Michael J. Fortier would get out of prison after serving time for his role in the 1995 bombing of the federal building that killed 168 people and injured 500. But as Fortier's release tomorrow approaches, the deal cut to secure his testimony against Timothy J. McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols is again gnawing at some of the survivors and relatives of the victims. They worry about a possible future threat posed by Fortier, 37, and the undisclosed terms of his release -- in particular whether he will gain federal witness protection.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2004
McALESTER, Okla. - The state jury that convicted Terry L. Nichols of murder in the Oklahoma City bombing will begin deliberating today whether he should die for his crimes. Prosecutors, in closing arguments yesterday, labeled Nichols a heartless killer; his attorneys called him a bit player, unaware of the scope and specifics of the 1995 attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. After a two-month trial, Nichols, 49, was found guilty on all counts brought by the state - arson, conspiracy to commit arson and 161 counts of first-degree murder.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2004
McALESTER, Okla. - The state jury that convicted Terry L. Nichols of murder in the Oklahoma City bombing will begin deliberating today whether he should die for his crimes. Prosecutors, in closing arguments yesterday, labeled Nichols a heartless killer; his attorneys called him a bit player, unaware of the scope and specifics of the 1995 attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. After a two-month trial, Nichols, 49, was found guilty on all counts brought by the state - arson, conspiracy to commit arson and 161 counts of first-degree murder.
NEWS
August 8, 1998
CAR BOMBS targeting U.S. embassies simultaneously, 450 miles apart, are out of character for the East African countries where they exploded. Kenya and Tanzania lack such traditions and are victims.The atrocities resemble the truck bomb in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 U.S. airmen in 1996. That remains unsolved. Under U.S. law, these bombings call for U.S. investigations and prosecutions, though the countries where they occur have sovereign jurisdiction.The United States received poor cooperation after the 1996 bombing from ally Saudi Arabia, which never allowed the FBI to interview jailed suspects.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
State police charged a Baltimore County man with attempted robbery of a Gamber bank and weapons counts late Wednesday, several hours after he was arrested near Westminster with a loaded .22-caliber revolver, a Chinese assault-type rifle with a bayonet and a pipe bomb, troopers said.Troopers stopped Christopher D. Taggart, 29, of the 17900 block of Marshall Mill Road at gunpoint on Route 97 between Route 32 and Hook Road, about six miles from a Westminster Bank & Trust Co. branch where an employee called police.
NEWS
April 5, 1996
THE NATION BREATHES easier with the hope that the FBI has the right suspect in the 18-year reign of selective terror ascribed to a shadowy, vengeful figure known only as Unabomber. Many people in many walks of life had been made afraid. Federal authorities created an expensive, sophisticated unit just to run this sole bomber to the ground, with nothing to show.Theodore J. Kaczynski's own family found the evidence pointing to him, and then had a job bringing it past the welter of false tips and fantasy leads to the attention of proper authority.
NEWS
February 25, 1997
COUNT ANOTHER decline in the quality of American life as New York's Empire State Building, workplace to thousands and magnet to three million visitors a year, installs metal detectors, scanners, magnetometers and bag searches between the TTC ground and the 86th floor observatory.That is a reasonable response to the rain of bullets Sunday from Ali Hassan Abu Kamal, a 69-year-old distraught Palestinian who had lost his life savings in a mysterious deal and had bought his .380 caliber Beretta semi-automatic handgun legally last month while a tourist in Florida.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
A former Baltimore man who wrote a book alleging a government conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing turned himself over to authorities yesterday to face charges that he tampered with a grand jury investigating the explosion.David M. Hoffman, 38, surrendered at 10 a.m. at the Oklahoma County Jail in Oklahoma City. As he was taken inside by sheriff's deputies, he declared that he is "a lowly reporter" being persecuted for telling the truth about a government cover-up.County prosecutors say that Hoffman mailed his book, "The Oklahoma City Bombing and the Politics of Terror," and an intimidating letter to the home of a man serving on a grand jury formed 18 months ago to re-investigate the bombing case.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1996
PHOENIX -- With residential streets cordoned off for fear of an accidental explosion, federal agents seized more than 100 high-powered rifles and hundreds of pounds of a bomb-making compound yesterday from the house of a man whom officials identified as the ordnance specialist of a local paramilitary group.The seizures followed the arrest on Monday of that suspect, Gary Bauer, and 11 other people on charges of conspiring to blow up government buildings in Phoenix.Janet Napolitano, the U.S. attorney for Arizona, said yesterday that the dozen people under arrest were the entire membership of the local paramilitary cell, the Viper Militia.
NEWS
By Lianne Hart and Scott Gold and Lianne Hart and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2004
McALESTER, Okla. - A jury convicted Terry L. Nichols of 161 state murder counts yesterday, rejecting defense claims that he had been an unwitting accomplice to the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. The jury, which deliberated for five hours, instead branded him a full partner of executed bomber Timothy J. McVeigh. Next week, prosecutors will try to persuade the same 12 jurors to do what a federal jury would not six years ago: sentence Nichols to death. As District Judge Steven Taylor announced the decision, Nichols, 49, looked wan but remained stone-faced.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 28, 2001
I GUESS THIS is a before-and-after column. Some of the items were composed before 9-11 and were held because of the events of that day. Some were written after 9-11 and because of it. I guess this is a transitional piece, a way of getting back to "normal" business. A lot of Americans have been taking their time getting back to "normal." Since 9-11, it's been difficult to think of much else. It's affected how we feel about a great many aspects of life, in ways too mysterious and difficult to measure.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
A former Baltimore man who wrote a book alleging a government conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing turned himself over to authorities yesterday to face charges that he tampered with a grand jury investigating the explosion.David M. Hoffman, 38, surrendered at 10 a.m. at the Oklahoma County Jail in Oklahoma City. As he was taken inside by sheriff's deputies, he declared that he is "a lowly reporter" being persecuted for telling the truth about a government cover-up.County prosecutors say that Hoffman mailed his book, "The Oklahoma City Bombing and the Politics of Terror," and an intimidating letter to the home of a man serving on a grand jury formed 18 months ago to re-investigate the bombing case.
NEWS
August 8, 1998
CAR BOMBS targeting U.S. embassies simultaneously, 450 miles apart, are out of character for the East African countries where they exploded. Kenya and Tanzania lack such traditions and are victims.The atrocities resemble the truck bomb in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 U.S. airmen in 1996. That remains unsolved. Under U.S. law, these bombings call for U.S. investigations and prosecutions, though the countries where they occur have sovereign jurisdiction.The United States received poor cooperation after the 1996 bombing from ally Saudi Arabia, which never allowed the FBI to interview jailed suspects.
NEWS
December 30, 1997
HC
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 1997
When Terry L. Nichols comes to trial in Denver on Sept. 29, on charges that he helped plot the Oklahoma City bombing, his lawyers are expected to spend a lot of time trying to focus the jury's attention on one point: Terry Nichols is not Timothy J. McVeigh.They have already said so in court. At a hearing last week, Nichols' attorneys tried to block the introduction of some trial evidence -- including evidence of Nichols' anti-government philosophies. The defense objected that government prosecutors were trying "to turn Mr. Nichols into Mr. McVeigh in the eyes of the jury."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Federal law enforcement officials revealed yesterday that residues found on Timothy J. McVeigh's clothing and other possessions appear to link him to the Oklahoma City bombing, and they also said that he warned a friend shortly before the blast last year to "watch what you say" because the "G-men" might find out.The new allegations are included in court papers prosecutors filed in Denver asking a federal judge to deny defense requests to...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1996
DEMING, Wash. -- The house painter who lives in this little country town is a family man, his neighbor Sharon Pietila says. "Middle class, very clean; he wouldn't blow anyone up," she said of John I. Pitner.Pitner has been in jail for nearly a month, joined by a chimney sweep, two Boeing Co. workers, a mason, a religious teacher, a television repairman and assorted odd jobbers. They are being held without bail in Seattle, indicted this month on federal charges of conspiring to make bombs for use against the U.S. government and the United Nations.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 1997
DENVER -- Timothy J. McVeigh, a Persian Gulf war veteran who believed patriotism required him to stand up to tyranny by bombing the Oklahoma City federal building, was sentenced to die yesterday for the worst terrorist attack in American history.McVeigh, 29, showed no emotion as he watched U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch read the death sentence. When the judge asked each juror if he or she agreed with the finding, McVeigh nodded in acknowledgment at every one.And as he was taken from the courtroom, just after the verdict was read at 3: 30 p.m., McVeigh gestured to his mother, father and crying sister and appeared to mouth, "It's OK."
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1997
DENVER -- In U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch's courtroom, proceedings start exactly on time. Windy lawyers are ordered to stop speechifying. Coats are not slung over chairs. There are no commercial television cameras.In Matsch's courtroom, where Timothy J. McVeigh is on trial charged with bombing the Oklahoma City federal building, attorneys are expected to be as well-prepared as the judge, to make their points and to sit down."He's the anti-Ito," says Andrew Cohen, a Denver lawyer and legal analyst.
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