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NEWS
October 8, 1995
THREE U.S. SERVICEMEN are in Japanese custody, charged with the rape of a 12-year-old girl on Okinawa. It is not the first such atrocity; it will not be the last, given the tensions bound to arise when 27,000 young Americans are concentrated on an overseas island. U.S. bases sprawl over 20 percent of Okinawa's land area and are home to 60 percent of the U.S. forces stationed in Japan.These figures should be kept in mind in assessing the outrage that erupted after U.S. authorities waited 25 days before handing over the accused servicemen once they had been indicted.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Marshall Norval "Buzz" Ragsdale, a retired National Cash Register sales executive, died of complications from multiple myeloma Saturday at his Timonium home. He was 91. Born in East Orange, N.J., he was a 1939 graduate of East Orange High School and attended Bucknell University, where he played freshman basketball. In July 1942, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and attended Officer Candidates School in Quantico, Va. He then served with Marine Fighting Squadron 314 on Midway, Ie Shima and Okinawa.
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NEWS
December 4, 1996
DEFENSE SECRETARY William Perry's agreement with Japanese counterparts, after a year of negotiation, should provide a steady foundation for U.S.-Japanese security cooperation into the future. It will not end Okinawans' irritation with the U.S. military presence and with the central government's using their poor-relation distant island as a dumping ground for inconvenient realities. But it is well designed to reduce that irritation.The agreement does not scale back the U.S. presence on Okinawa so much as downsize the facilities to match current use. That entails giving back a fifth of the land the U.S. occupies, closing or moving 11 facilities, reducing noise from aircraft, no longer closing a highway for artillery practice and -- most exciting creating the greatest civil engineering marvel since the Channel Tunnel to move a noisy helicopter base offshore.
EXPLORE
January 17, 2013
100 Years Ago Guests, visitors and callers From the Times social column: "Rev. Watson E. Holly was a dinner guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William M. Harman, Sr. of Howard county. "Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Harman have been entertaining Miss Hopkins, of Washington, and Mr. Frank Taylor, of Hanover. "Miss Bessie Ruppert has returned from a visit to relatives in Washington. "Mrs. R.A. Hammond spent Monday in Baltimore. "Miss Eleanor Maynard and Mr. Harold H. Newman, of Baltimore, were callers at 'Rupee' Sunday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 20, 1995
TOKYO -- The apparent rape this month of a 12-year-old Japanese school girl by three American servicemen in Okinawa has provoked an uproar in Japan, bringing calls to revise rules that critics say make it easy for American soldiers to get away with crimes and calls to remove American military bases.Seeking to quell the outcry, Ambassador Walter F. Mondale and Lt. Gen. Richard B. Myers, commander of U.S. military forces in Japan, apologized to Okinawa Gov. Masahide Ota at a meeting yesterday at the American Embassy.
NEWS
By Emi Doi and Michael Zielenziger and Emi Doi and Michael Zielenziger,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 22, 2001
Almost every morning, Ushi Okushima rises from her futon and heads across the street for a vigorous sunrise walk on a sandy Okinawan beach. Later, some friends join her for morning tea before she heads to her fields. There, swinging a 4-pound hoe, a barefoot Okushima will chop the weeds around her radish and carrot plants for hours, thinking about her menu for the coming New Year's festivities. Okushima turned 100 in August. "I never get sick, and my blood pressure is very stable," Okushima says.
NEWS
February 20, 2001
AUTHORITIES are doing everything right in the wake of the tragic sinking of the Japanese fishing school trawler Ehime Maru, by the nuclear submarine USS Greeneville, Feb. 9. It is not enough. The Navy's investigation and the National Transportation Safety Board's separate inquiry must proceed with the greatest transparency. The search for the four students, two teachers and three crewmen lost at sea should continue as long as Japan insists. The trawler should be raised and returned to Japan.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
On Memorial Day 50 years ago, the nation was in the midst of a poignant period, never to be repeated, of celebrating fresh victory in Europe without knowing that triumph over Japan was but ten weeks away. Scores of young Americans were dying daily in the fierce battles for Okinawa and other Pacific strongpoints.The Evening Sun, in an editorial, captured the mixture of relief in Hitler's overthrow and the dread of what lay ahead in the Pacific. "This year we know half the task is done," the paper declared, but then added: "We cannot dare tell ourselves that by the time another Memorial Day comes the war in the East too will have ended in final victory, but it is the deepest hope of all Americans that it will be."
EXPLORE
January 17, 2013
100 Years Ago Guests, visitors and callers From the Times social column: "Rev. Watson E. Holly was a dinner guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William M. Harman, Sr. of Howard county. "Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Harman have been entertaining Miss Hopkins, of Washington, and Mr. Frank Taylor, of Hanover. "Miss Bessie Ruppert has returned from a visit to relatives in Washington. "Mrs. R.A. Hammond spent Monday in Baltimore. "Miss Eleanor Maynard and Mr. Harold H. Newman, of Baltimore, were callers at 'Rupee' Sunday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The United States and Japan announced a sweeping agreement yesterday to reshape their military alliance, including reducing the number of Marines on Okinawa and the construction of a new generation of radar equipment in Japan as part of a missile defense system. After a morning meeting of the two nations' foreign and defense ministers, a joint agreement was released calling on Japan to accept more responsibility for its defense, and requiring the United States and Japan to further integrate planning in case of conflict.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 27, 2011
Charles L. Schelberg, a retired Eastern Shore banker and a World War II veteran who served with the Navy in the Pacific, died June 19 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Queenstown resident was 86. Mr. Schelberg was born in Wilmington, Del., and raised in Towson, where he graduated in 1942 from Towson High School. He attended Washington College for a year before enlisting in the Navy in 1943. Mr. Schelberg was a seaman assigned to the destroyer escort USS Abercrombie, where he was a member of an anti-aircraft gun crew and performed damage-control duties.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2011
Robert Rokuro Omata, a retired U.S. Public Health Service captain and National Institutes of Health administrator, died of lung cancer May 10 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Millersville resident was 90. Born and raised in Hanford, Calif., he was the son of a grocer and a homemaker who had immigrated from Japan many years earlier. When World War II began, he was in his senior year as a biology major at the University of California at Berkeley. "He and his family were among 120,000 loyal American citizens of Japanese ancestry who were forced to evacuate their homes in several Western states and live in relocation camps," said his daughter, Donna R. Omata of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Eugene Fressenjat "Gene" Raphel, a World War II veteran and surveyor whose clients for the past 55 years included the federal, state and county jurisdictions as well as numerous commercial firms and private individuals, died Jan. 7 of a stroke at his Monkton home. He was 90. Mr. Raphel, the son of a businessman and a homemaker, was born on Woodbine Farm in Upper Falls. After graduating in 1937 from St. Stephen School in Bradshaw, he began his lifelong career in land surveying with the Roland Park Co. In 1939, he went to work for what was then Whitman, Requardt and Smith, designing and laying out the railroad network for the wartime expansion of Edgewood Arsenal.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2008
Charles Sumner Dawson, a pharmaceutical researcher and World War II veteran who lived most of his life in Baltimore County, died of heart failure Thursday. He was 87. Mr. Dawson was born in Scranton, Pa., the eldest of three children. His father, an executive for an electric company, died when Mr. Dawson was 5 years old, after a bout with the flu. His mother remarried a few years later. Mr. Dawson grew up in the western suburbs of Philadelphia, referred to as the "main line," and later graduated from Lower Merion High School.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The United States and Japan announced a sweeping agreement yesterday to reshape their military alliance, including reducing the number of Marines on Okinawa and the construction of a new generation of radar equipment in Japan as part of a missile defense system. After a morning meeting of the two nations' foreign and defense ministers, a joint agreement was released calling on Japan to accept more responsibility for its defense, and requiring the United States and Japan to further integrate planning in case of conflict.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2002
OKINAWA, Japan - In a Naha conference room, journalists from the Ryukyu Shimpo newspaper explain their unyielding objection to the 37 U.S. military bases housed on Japan's southernmost prefecture. The security alliance between Japan and the United States does not justify the crime, sexual harassment, noise, pollution, fatal collisions and other hazards caused by the bases and their inhabitants, they say. "We feel sometimes that the military presence itself is a threat to security and human rights," an editor tells a group of American journalists.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Eugene Fressenjat "Gene" Raphel, a World War II veteran and surveyor whose clients for the past 55 years included the federal, state and county jurisdictions as well as numerous commercial firms and private individuals, died Jan. 7 of a stroke at his Monkton home. He was 90. Mr. Raphel, the son of a businessman and a homemaker, was born on Woodbine Farm in Upper Falls. After graduating in 1937 from St. Stephen School in Bradshaw, he began his lifelong career in land surveying with the Roland Park Co. In 1939, he went to work for what was then Whitman, Requardt and Smith, designing and laying out the railroad network for the wartime expansion of Edgewood Arsenal.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Marshall Norval "Buzz" Ragsdale, a retired National Cash Register sales executive, died of complications from multiple myeloma Saturday at his Timonium home. He was 91. Born in East Orange, N.J., he was a 1939 graduate of East Orange High School and attended Bucknell University, where he played freshman basketball. In July 1942, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and attended Officer Candidates School in Quantico, Va. He then served with Marine Fighting Squadron 314 on Midway, Ie Shima and Okinawa.
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