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Oil Spill

NEWS
June 14, 2010
The spill in the Gulf of Mexico should ring like a gong that the current industries that produce the means for our energy needs cannot be allowed to police themselves. BP and others have extensive track records and have been cited and fined numerous times for their utter disregard for the planet and its people. Having said that, here is a part of a speech by President Obama back in February: "Investing in nuclear energy remains a necessary step. The choices we make will affect not just the next generation but many generations to come."
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FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University are gearing up to study the ecosystem of Sarasota Bay before crude oil from the BP Deepwater blowout reaches southwest Florida waters. Working in cooperation with the Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, the Maryland researchers will collect samples of sediments, water and marine organisms as a baseline for comparison later, if the oil reaches the area. "We want to make sure we have that 'pre' information, otherwise it will be almost impossible to obtain meaningful values for the damage that will have occurred to the natural resources," said Erik Rifkin, interim executive director of the National Aquarium Conservation Center.
NEWS
By Jon Wong | October 19, 2010
Six months ago, on April 20, BP's Deepwater Horizon oil drilling rig exploded in a fiery mass that killed 11 men and led to the worst oil spill in U.S. history. Around 200 million gallons of oil — about 11 times more than the Exxon-Valdez spill — flowed into the Gulf of Mexico over the next 87 days before BP's fifth or sixth attempt to stop the well finally worked. This catastrophic spill spread across hundreds of miles of coast despite the best efforts of more than 40,000 cleanup workers, thousands of boats, the involvement of the Nobel Prize-wining physicist who heads the Department of Energy, the input of our nation's national energy laboratories, and BP's expenditure of $8 billion on cleanup.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
In an interview on National Public Radio this week, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour said that the Gulf oil spill was an example of the free market working properly. He reasoned that BP had the most to lose from the spill, namely $100 million per day in costs. And thus, BP had the greatest incentive to clean-up the oil spill. His conclusion is odd: The market functions properly when an oil company has repeated safety violations, ultimately causing an oil rig explosion that causes a loss in lives and perhaps the greatest environmental catastrophe in history.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
AQUASCO — A decade after 140,000 gallons of oil leaked into a Patuxent River tributary and became Maryland's worst spill, the water doesn't show a hint of the environmental devastation. But wedge a stick into the bottom of Swanson Creek and it comes up slimed with oil. Oil from that April 2000 spill fouled 20 miles of shoreline, devastated water-dependent businesses and killed hundreds of turtles, fish, muskrats and other wildlife. Those who helped clean up acknowledge that the process was chaotic, and that remnants of the slick remain buried in the Southern Maryland river bottom.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Suzana Pesa was disgusted by the images of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that she saw on television. She jumped on the Internet and was soon linked to a Facebook effort to gather hair clippings from local salons to make hair booms to soak up the waves of black, greasy gook. "When it happened, I was really upset," said Pesa, a dental assistant living in Mount Vernon. "I was looking for anything I could do to help." In two weeks, Pesa gathered two garbage bags filled with hair clippings from 10 salons in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Traffic on southbound Interstate 95 was delayed north of the Fort McHenry Tunnel tollbooths while crews cleaned up oil spilled due to a two-vehicle collision, a Maryland Transportation Authority Police spokesman said. Injuries were reported in the crash, and one person was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center with non-life-threatening injuries, said the spokesman, Sgt. Kirk Perez. The incident was reported just before 7 a.m. and traffic was backed up seven miles at 7:45 a.m., he said.
NEWS
November 18, 2005
The thing about a little fib is that it makes you wonder what bigger fibs might lie behind it. Last week, for example, five top oil company executives went to Capitol Hill to explain that their record-high profits this fall were not their doing, but flowed from the immutable laws of supply and demand. We"re thinking, well, maybe - and then comes a report in Wednesday's Washington Post that something else they all agreed on just wasn't true. In answer to a seemingly minor question, they said their companies hadn't taken part in Vice President Dick Cheney's closed-door energy policy meetings back in 2001, but a White House document shows otherwise.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- The Chesapeake Bay is likely to be devastated by a large oil spill unless federal and state governments act promptly to tighten safety requirements for waterborne and pipeline transportation of fuel, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation warned today.The environmental group released a report pointing out that barge and tanker traffic on the bay is exempt from much of the federal spill-prevention law passed by Congress in the wake of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska five years ago.About 4 billion gallons of petroleum products are transported on the Chesapeake every year, the report notes, and the volume is steadily rising on a body of water that is even busier than Prince William Sound, where the supertanker Exxon Valdez hit a reef and spilled nearly 11 million gallons of crude.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- A Coast Guard official said Saturday that an oil spill this month in the Savannah River has turned out to be much larger than originally thought after two weeks of assessment. Petty Officer Bobby Nash, a spokesman for the Coast Guard District 7, said the spill is estimated to be between 20,000 and 22,000 gallons, about 15,000 gallons more than the previous estimate. Nash said the source of the July 17 spill that shut down a 12-mile stretch of the river and part of the Intracoastal Waterway remains unknown.
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