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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1990
LONDON -- Safety regulations on offshore oil rigs in Britain's North Sea are to be tightened in the wake of an official finding yesterday of "unsafe practices" aboard the Piper Alpha rig, which was turned into an inferno in 1988, killing 167 men.Occidental Petroleum, the U.S. owner of the rig, was charged with being "too easily satisfied" that regulations were being followed at the time of the fatal explosion.The charge in the official inquiry report also accused the company of failing to provide proper emergency training for its staff and paying insufficient attention to the disaster threat.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 25, 2011
Et cetera Glib favored at Laurel in Dave's Friend Stakes After an impressive performance in the Maryland Million Nursery two starts back, Glib makes his second appearance at Laurel Park in the $75,000 Dave's Friend Stakes on Saturday. The six-furlong test drew seven 2-year-olds. Glib, the 8-5 morning-line favorite, was a 4-1/2-length winner of the Nursery for trainer Jerry Robb at odds of 5-1 off a maiden score at Charles Town in his debut. This month at Aqueduct, the son of Great Notion was bumped leaving the starting gate and was a well-beaten third as the betting choice in the Lord Henry Stakes.
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NEWS
January 10, 2011
Property owners in Western Maryland willing to believe the claims that the extraction of underground natural gas through hydraulic fracturing can be done cleanly and safely without permanent harmful environmental impact might want to consider buying a capped BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Even large short-term profits are not worth permanent toxic pollution and environmental degradation. Anyone interested in this issue should view the website and/or the trailer (on YouTube)
NEWS
January 10, 2011
Property owners in Western Maryland willing to believe the claims that the extraction of underground natural gas through hydraulic fracturing can be done cleanly and safely without permanent harmful environmental impact might want to consider buying a capped BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Even large short-term profits are not worth permanent toxic pollution and environmental degradation. Anyone interested in this issue should view the website and/or the trailer (on YouTube)
SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 25, 2011
Et cetera Glib favored at Laurel in Dave's Friend Stakes After an impressive performance in the Maryland Million Nursery two starts back, Glib makes his second appearance at Laurel Park in the $75,000 Dave's Friend Stakes on Saturday. The six-furlong test drew seven 2-year-olds. Glib, the 8-5 morning-line favorite, was a 4-1/2-length winner of the Nursery for trainer Jerry Robb at odds of 5-1 off a maiden score at Charles Town in his debut. This month at Aqueduct, the son of Great Notion was bumped leaving the starting gate and was a well-beaten third as the betting choice in the Lord Henry Stakes.
NEWS
June 12, 2010
This week, students at North Harford Middle School wrote a series of letters to the editor about the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The following is a selection of their work. The rest can be viewed online at baltimoresun.com/bpletters. End the oil spill blame game On April 20, a BP drilling rig on the Gulf Mexico exploded, causing the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The oil rig was leased to BP by Transocean, and Halliburton was working on sealing off the well before the blast.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Looking out from his waterfront home in Fairhope, Ala., Frederick "Rick" T. Kuykendall III can see miles of boom protecting a coastline endangered by millions of gallons of oil pouring out of a well in the Gulf of Mexico. In all his years of environmental law, Kuykendall couldn't have expected that what might be his biggest case would happen in the region where he grew up. Kuykendall, 55, is a lawyer affiliated with the Murphy Firm in Baltimore, headed by Billy Murphy, that specializes in complex commercial litigation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2003
DOHA, Qatar - A Yemeni gunman killed an American, a Canadian and a Yemeni worker at an American oil rig in northern Yemen yesterday and then killed himself, the Hunt Oil Co. said. A Canadian worker was wounded. A State Department official said it was not immediately clear whether the attack was "politically motivated" or linked to the increasing likelihood of war with Iraq. Americans working in the Middle East have been warned of the heightened risk of terrorism as American-led troops in the Persian Gulf region prepare for hostilities against Baghdad.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
Within a matter of hours on Wednesday, three announcements concerning U.S. energy policy held deep ramifications for the future of the Chesapeake Bay: The disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is even more disastrous than originally thought; the wind farm project off the shores of Cape Cod has won federal approval; and Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell is sticking with his endorsement of oil exploration and drilling off Virginia's shores within...
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 2001
ALPINE FIELD, Alaska - Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang. It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Looking out from his waterfront home in Fairhope, Ala., Frederick "Rick" T. Kuykendall III can see miles of boom protecting a coastline endangered by millions of gallons of oil pouring out of a well in the Gulf of Mexico. In all his years of environmental law, Kuykendall couldn't have expected that what might be his biggest case would happen in the region where he grew up. Kuykendall, 55, is a lawyer affiliated with the Murphy Firm in Baltimore, headed by Billy Murphy, that specializes in complex commercial litigation.
NEWS
June 12, 2010
This week, students at North Harford Middle School wrote a series of letters to the editor about the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The following is a selection of their work. The rest can be viewed online at baltimoresun.com/bpletters. End the oil spill blame game On April 20, a BP drilling rig on the Gulf Mexico exploded, causing the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The oil rig was leased to BP by Transocean, and Halliburton was working on sealing off the well before the blast.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
Within a matter of hours on Wednesday, three announcements concerning U.S. energy policy held deep ramifications for the future of the Chesapeake Bay: The disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is even more disastrous than originally thought; the wind farm project off the shores of Cape Cod has won federal approval; and Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell is sticking with his endorsement of oil exploration and drilling off Virginia's shores within...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2003
DOHA, Qatar - A Yemeni gunman killed an American, a Canadian and a Yemeni worker at an American oil rig in northern Yemen yesterday and then killed himself, the Hunt Oil Co. said. A Canadian worker was wounded. A State Department official said it was not immediately clear whether the attack was "politically motivated" or linked to the increasing likelihood of war with Iraq. Americans working in the Middle East have been warned of the heightened risk of terrorism as American-led troops in the Persian Gulf region prepare for hostilities against Baghdad.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 2001
ALPINE FIELD, Alaska - Jutting out of the sparkling snowfield, the exploratory oil rig is crammed with pipes, platforms and state-of-the-art computer gear. A crew in hard hats, wrestling with a huge vertical pipe moving in and out of the ground, is shouting above the constant clang. It looks like a regular rig but sits on a thick pad of ice, doing minimal damage to the tender tundra, according to its operator, Phillips Alaska, which opened the 300 million-barrel field near Prudhoe Bay in November.
FEATURES
By Ralph Marsh and Ralph Marsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 14, 1996
The land that is now Oklahoma was heralded as the adventurous man's last Eden. Free land! the fliers seeking settlers trumpeted. Grass belly-high to a tall horse! Deep black soil never touched by a plow!In fact, the appeal was so enticing that Okla huma -- "red human," in the Choctaw language -- was nicknamed the Sooner State when whites hungry for Indian soil couldn't wait for the crack of the pistol to start the great land runs of the 1880s and 1890s.Since those early days, the word "Oklahoma" has called to mind everything from the dusty misery of John Steinbeck's Depression-era novel "The Grapes of Wrath" to the farmers and cowmen who praised the "waving wheat that sure smells sweet" in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!"
FEATURES
By Ralph Marsh and Ralph Marsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 14, 1996
The land that is now Oklahoma was heralded as the adventurous man's last Eden. Free land! the fliers seeking settlers trumpeted. Grass belly-high to a tall horse! Deep black soil never touched by a plow!In fact, the appeal was so enticing that Okla huma -- "red human," in the Choctaw language -- was nicknamed the Sooner State when whites hungry for Indian soil couldn't wait for the crack of the pistol to start the great land runs of the 1880s and 1890s.Since those early days, the word "Oklahoma" has called to mind everything from the dusty misery of John Steinbeck's Depression-era novel "The Grapes of Wrath" to the farmers and cowmen who praised the "waving wheat that sure smells sweet" in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!"
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1990
LONDON -- Safety regulations on offshore oil rigs in Britain's North Sea are to be tightened in the wake of an official finding yesterday of "unsafe practices" aboard the Piper Alpha rig, which was turned into an inferno in 1988, killing 167 men.Occidental Petroleum, the U.S. owner of the rig, was charged with being "too easily satisfied" that regulations were being followed at the time of the fatal explosion.The charge in the official inquiry report also accused the company of failing to provide proper emergency training for its staff and paying insufficient attention to the disaster threat.
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