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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 27, 2012
Emergency operations officials in Harford County said persistent calls received about gas odors from numerous locations in the county early Friday morning appear to be related to fumes from an oil refinery in New Jersey. No sources of gas were found in the county, but local fire companies were busy throughout Friday morning and into the early afternoon responding to calls of gas odors or suspected gas leaks. Harford Emergency Operations spokesman Rick Ayers said early Friday morning the county was informed by state emergency operations officials that fumes from an industrial facility in New Jersey had been detected in the air in Harford and Cecil counties and in New Castle County, Del. In a later statement, the county government said the fumes were from an oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., which is on the New Jersey shore of the Delaware River and across the river from Philadelphia International Airport.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 27, 2012
Emergency operations officials in Harford County said persistent calls received about gas odors from numerous locations in the county early Friday morning appear to be related to fumes from an oil refinery in New Jersey. No sources of gas were found in the county, but local fire companies were busy throughout Friday morning and into the early afternoon responding to calls of gas odors or suspected gas leaks. Harford Emergency Operations spokesman Rick Ayers said early Friday morning the county was informed by state emergency operations officials that fumes from an industrial facility in New Jersey had been detected in the air in Harford and Cecil counties and in New Castle County, Del. In a later statement, the county government said the fumes were from an oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., which is on the New Jersey shore of the Delaware River and across the river from Philadelphia International Airport.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2004
WARSAW, Poland - The new scandal mesmerizing Poland seems lifted from a Cold War dossier: Spies, oil traders, a polo player and a billionaire are tangled in a rumored plot by Moscow to manipulate the politics and fortunes of its smaller neighbor. "It's a sad, ridiculous story about corruption and political vendettas," said Ryszard Maria Owczarek, a painter who has been avidly following the tale of death threats and rumored bribes that has fascinated the Polish press. "Many ugly things will come out. The dirt is already being heaped."
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Seven inmates were killed yesterday when mortar shells slammed into an Iraqi Interior Ministry jail in the capital, Iraqi security officials said. A few miles south, fire broke out at one of Iraq's main oil refineries, a possible case of sabotage. There were conflicting reports about the cause of the blaze, but police said a Katyusha rocket hit a gas tanker. More than 450 attacks have been carried out against Iraq's oil installations or industry employees since the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003, according to analysts who monitor security issues related to energy.
BUSINESS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- Bowing to national and international pressures, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari closed a polluting oil refinery yesterday, while U.S. officials for the first time confirmed that loan guarantees to the state oil monopoly -- a major player in the anti-smog campaign -- could go as high as $6 billion.The refinery closing and the loan guarantees come at a time when both countries are under mounting pressure to do something meaningful about Mexico's horrendous pollution problems.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
CALIFORNIA - Citizens in the "Mother County of Maryland," some of whose ancestry n the region harks back to the 1600s, want their voices heard by government. When government turns a deaf ear, the people of St. Mary's County know who shouts loudest.For three decades, the Potomac River Association has turned up the volume on politicians and developers. From its first clash against a proposed oil refinery to its most recent project - the public acquisition of Myrtle Point - the group has united friend and foe in efforts to preserve Southern Maryland's heritage.
NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | February 1, 1991
TODAY, the world watches not just a massive conflict in the Middle East, but perhaps the planet's first true eco-war.Nuclear and chemical warfare has been threatened; threats to use oil as a weapon have now become a reality. Along with all thoughtful people, I shudder at the implications of what appears to be an ever-escalating, ever more desperate battleground. I am especially disturbed because of the Middle East's ecological significance, and its personal significance for me.In 1951, the Middle East was the destination of the first voyage of our ship, Calypso.
BUSINESS
By Mark A. Uhlig and Mark A. Uhlig,New York Times News Service | March 19, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- In a dramatic move to combat this city's deepening air pollution crisis, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari ordered yesterday the immediate closing of the city's largest government-operated oil refinery.The decision to close the March 18 Refinery, which sprawls over 430 acres in the north of the city, will cost an estimated $500 million and will reduce the country's crude-oil refining capacity by more than 100,000 barrels a day.In addition, oil industry officials said it will force Mexico to import some kinds of gasoline until new refining capacity can be built.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Seven inmates were killed yesterday when mortar shells slammed into an Iraqi Interior Ministry jail in the capital, Iraqi security officials said. A few miles south, fire broke out at one of Iraq's main oil refineries, a possible case of sabotage. There were conflicting reports about the cause of the blaze, but police said a Katyusha rocket hit a gas tanker. More than 450 attacks have been carried out against Iraq's oil installations or industry employees since the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003, according to analysts who monitor security issues related to energy.
NEWS
By Jad Mouwad and Jad Mouwad,New York Times News Service | July 22, 2007
Oil refineries across America have been troubled by a record number of fires, power failures, leaks, spills and breakdowns this year, causing dozens of them to shut down temporarily or trim production. The disruptions are helping to drive gasoline prices to highs not seen since last summer. These mechanical breakdowns have created a bottleneck in domestic energy supplies, helping to push up gasoline prices 50 cents this year, to well above $3 a gallon. A third of the country's 150 refineries have reported disruptions to their operations since the beginning of the year, a record, according to analysts.
NEWS
By Jad Mouwad and Jad Mouwad,New York Times News Service | July 22, 2007
Oil refineries across America have been troubled by a record number of fires, power failures, leaks, spills and breakdowns this year, causing dozens of them to shut down temporarily or trim production. The disruptions are helping to drive gasoline prices to highs not seen since last summer. These mechanical breakdowns have created a bottleneck in domestic energy supplies, helping to push up gasoline prices 50 cents this year, to well above $3 a gallon. A third of the country's 150 refineries have reported disruptions to their operations since the beginning of the year, a record, according to analysts.
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | May 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With gasoline prices averaging $3.21 for a gallon of regular nationwide over the Memorial Day weekend, traditional economic logic might suggest that this would be a good time to invest in new U.S. oil refineries and increase the supply of gasoline. Yet no new refinery has been built in the United States in three decades, only one is in the works and oil companies are scaling back planned investments in new, expanded or modernized U.S. refineries rather than increasing them.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The House approved legislation yesterday that seeks to spur construction of oil refineries - the first major congressional response to rising energy prices and tight supplies after Hurricane Katrina. The bill passed 212-210, but only after House Republican leaders extended the roll call from a scheduled five minutes to about 40 minutes to round up the votes. Partisan tension boiled over, as Democrats shouted, "Shame! Shame! Shame!" to protest the prolonged vote. The measure was approved after the bill's GOP sponsors dropped the most contentious provision - relaxing anti-pollution rules for refinery projects - after moderate Republicans threatened to vote against the bill and possibly kill it. Still, every Democrat who was present voted "no," contending that the legislation was designed more to shield the GOP-controlled Congress from political fallout from high gas prices than to bring down fuel costs.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Warren Vieth,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush will propose measures to address the "root causes" of high energy prices, including possible construction of oil refineries on closed military bases and a tax break for "clean diesel" vehicles, administration officials said yesterday. The initiatives will be outlined in an energy policy address Bush is to make today at a Small Business Administration conference here, according to three senior officials who briefed reporters on condition of anonymity. They go beyond proposals already contained in the White House's comprehensive energy plan and in legislation before Congress, the officials said.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2004
WARSAW, Poland - The new scandal mesmerizing Poland seems lifted from a Cold War dossier: Spies, oil traders, a polo player and a billionaire are tangled in a rumored plot by Moscow to manipulate the politics and fortunes of its smaller neighbor. "It's a sad, ridiculous story about corruption and political vendettas," said Ryszard Maria Owczarek, a painter who has been avidly following the tale of death threats and rumored bribes that has fascinated the Polish press. "Many ugly things will come out. The dirt is already being heaped."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators are bungling the job of making sure that the nation's oil refineries - among the country's biggest polluters - reduce their emissions as promised. The Environmental Protection Agency's inspector general released a report yesterday that says the EPA's pollution cops aren't adequately monitoring the air and water at the 42 refineries that are under court order to reduce emissions. The report also said enforcement officials delayed the refiners' attempts to clean up the air because the EPA was several months late on 98 percent of its paperwork.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Warren Vieth,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush will propose measures to address the "root causes" of high energy prices, including possible construction of oil refineries on closed military bases and a tax break for "clean diesel" vehicles, administration officials said yesterday. The initiatives will be outlined in an energy policy address Bush is to make today at a Small Business Administration conference here, according to three senior officials who briefed reporters on condition of anonymity. They go beyond proposals already contained in the White House's comprehensive energy plan and in legislation before Congress, the officials said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | May 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With gasoline prices averaging $3.21 for a gallon of regular nationwide over the Memorial Day weekend, traditional economic logic might suggest that this would be a good time to invest in new U.S. oil refineries and increase the supply of gasoline. Yet no new refinery has been built in the United States in three decades, only one is in the works and oil companies are scaling back planned investments in new, expanded or modernized U.S. refineries rather than increasing them.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
Crown Central Petroleum Corp., a Baltimore institution for the past 70 years, might get out of the oil-refining business. Financial advisers for Rosemore Inc., a holding company poised to buy all of Crown and take it private, have laid out two scenarios - one in which Rosemore would infuse more money into upgrading Crown's refineries, and one in which those refineries would be sold. In documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday by Crown and Rosemore, which is owned by Crown's controlling family, the advisers estimated that the company would be significantly more valuable without the refineries.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
CALIFORNIA - Citizens in the "Mother County of Maryland," some of whose ancestry n the region harks back to the 1600s, want their voices heard by government. When government turns a deaf ear, the people of St. Mary's County know who shouts loudest.For three decades, the Potomac River Association has turned up the volume on politicians and developers. From its first clash against a proposed oil refinery to its most recent project - the public acquisition of Myrtle Point - the group has united friend and foe in efforts to preserve Southern Maryland's heritage.
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