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NEWS
March 23, 2013
Harry Alford's March 7 commentary, "Anti-fracking legislation is premature," had me scratching my head. It completely ignored the serious and documented environmental and climate issues caused by hydraulic fracturing, the very issues the bill would address. Instead, Mr. Alford, president of the National Black Chamber of Commerce, touts the economic benefits of fracking for Maryland and for the U.S. as a whole. He even hints that this bill, designed to protect Maryland from unsafe fracking, could lead to "interfering with the shale gas boom elsewhere.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
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NEWS
By Casey Bukro and Casey Bukro,Chicago Tribune | September 1, 1991
ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, Alaska -- Bracing himself against the cool breezes sweeping off the Arctic Ocean, Dave Hite holds up a piece of dark brown rock as if it were an omen."
NEWS
February 12, 2014
I'm so glad the Obama administration is developing support mechanisms to help the livestock industry adjust to the impacts of climate change ("U.S. sets up 10 'climate hubs' to assist farmers, ranchers," Feb 6). Since the industry is among the largest sources of greenhouse gases, it's only appropriate the government establish a support program to help them with their addiction, right? Next, shall we also establish a burn healing center for arsonists? How about a road rash support group for dirt bike gangs?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 1998
MONTEREY, Calif. -- President Clinton, navigating a middle course between environmentalists and oil companies, announced yesterday a 10-year extension of the current moratorium on oil drilling off virtually all American ocean coastlines.Clinton also placed several existing marine sanctuaries permanently off-limits to oil exploration. The areas include the Channel Islands and Monterey Bay sanctuaries in California, the Florida Keys, Gray's Reef in Georgia and the Olympic Coast sanctuary off Washington state.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 19, 1992
The latest statistics on the American oil industry make it sound as though the oil patch has discovered time travel. Oil imports are at their highest levels since 1978 and domestic production has fallen to where it was back in 1961, the American Petroleum Institute said last week.And the number of oil and gas drilling rigs at work in the country recently hit a low not seen since records began to be kept 50 years ago.As for the future of the U.S.-based oil industry, it appears to be somewhere abroad, where companies are drilling with a vengeance.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 2006
Making money is supposed to be a foundation of American capitalism, and it's crucial to keeping investors happy. But U.S. oil companies are finding that record profits haven't helped their image, not with consumers angry about higher gas prices and politicians searching for short-term cures. Oil businesses are trying to explain why their profits aren't a bad thing. The price of mangling that message could be steep: Some in Congress are discussing added regulations as well as a windfall profits tax that the industry fears could send it into a skid.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Obama administration's latest move to permit testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states is drawing flak from both environmentalists and the oil industry. Speaking at a lightly attended public hearing Wednesday afternoon in Annapolis, some residents said they feared the testing might hurt whales and dolphins, disrupt fishing and damage tourism. They also warned that the risks of a spill were too great to warrant even looking for oil. "Avoiding activities that will harm or kill any more marine mammals is significantly more important to me than succumbing to today's frenzied pressures to reduce gasoline prices by a mere 3 cents [er gallon]
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | February 4, 2007
I am a shareholder in BP PLC who is concerned about the company's prospects, especially with its leadership issues. - K.L., via the Internet The giant oil company, formed by the merger of British Petroleum Co. and Amoco Corp. in 1998, has set the bar high with production growth targets that exceed those of its competitors. It has an impressive portfolio of deep-water oil and gas projects and in liquefied natural gas, while its chemical operations are especially strong in Asia. A consistent performer, it hasn't had an unprofitable year in the past decade, and its disclosure of financial information has been admirable.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2003
VIENNA, Austria - Iraqi and U.S. officials said yesterday that they had agreed on a $1.6 billion plan to rehabilitate Iraq's oil industry over eight months. The plan would be the first step to overhauling an industry eroded by 12 years of United Nations sanctions and the past five months of war and looting, according to Iraqi and U.S. officials and industry analysts. "The rehabilitation plan is not to increase production but to take it back to previous levels," said Shamkhi al-Faraj, head of the Iraqi Oil Ministry's economics department.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
Your recent article on hydraulic fracturing stopped me in my tracks ("Furor over fracking in Va. forest," Jan. 26). I spent my undergraduate days at Bridgewater College in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. One of the highlights was the resplendent beauty of George Washington National Forest and the breathtaking view from atop Reddish Knob. The idea that one of nature's gifts is to be sacrificed to the promoters and opportunists of high-volume hydraulic fracking is unconscionable.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
It isn't hard to recognize an example of false economy in the average household budget. The vegetable gardener who spends $500 on supplies to produce $12 in produce, the inexpensive home repair that falls apart in a month or the avid shopper who saves $5 online but pays an extra $20 in shipping and handling. Yet for some reason many of us are blind to the false economy of providing gasoline at the cheapest price possible regardless of its impact on our lives and society. To put it bluntly, humans have been subsidizing the cost of gas by accepting - without direct charge - the air pollution gas-burning vehicles generate.
NEWS
By Neela Banerjee and Carrie Wells, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
The Obama administration is expected to propose new rules today that would slash the amount of sulfur in gasoline, one of the most significant steps the administration can take this term toward cutting air pollution, people with knowledge of the announcement said. The new rules would bring the rest of the country's sulfur standards in line with California's gasoline program. The oil industry has warned of resulting price increases and has been joined by members of Congress from oil states in criticizing the standards as onerous with few health benefits in return.
NEWS
March 23, 2013
Harry Alford's March 7 commentary, "Anti-fracking legislation is premature," had me scratching my head. It completely ignored the serious and documented environmental and climate issues caused by hydraulic fracturing, the very issues the bill would address. Instead, Mr. Alford, president of the National Black Chamber of Commerce, touts the economic benefits of fracking for Maryland and for the U.S. as a whole. He even hints that this bill, designed to protect Maryland from unsafe fracking, could lead to "interfering with the shale gas boom elsewhere.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Hooray for Del. Heather Mizeur for staring down oil companies over fracking in Maryland ("No studies? No fracking," Sept. 13). Delegate Mizeur is demanding solid, scientific studies of all the risks of fracking before allowing it here. The oil industry maintains that fracking is safe. But if fracking is safe, why did the oil industry seek, and get, special treatment in the 2005 Energy Bill to keep the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from regulating fracking? This "Halliburton Loophole" is named after former Vice President and Halliburton oil chief Dick Cheney.
NEWS
May 9, 2012
It was recently reported thatExxon Mobil Corp.earned $825 billion in revenue in 2011. Think about that for a moment. That is nearly one trillion dollars in just one year, made largely on the backs of hard-working Americans forced to pay $4 per gallon at the pump. And where is all this money going? No doubt to pay for fat executive bonuses and to bribe corrupt members of Congress to continue doing the bidding of the oil industry. Clearly, a change is in order, and with that in mind I propose the following: Since we are now in the business of invading countries in order to steal their oil (under the guise of a war on terror)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The new civil administration in Iraq named two Iraqi oil officials and a former American oil executive yesterday to lead the country's oil industry, offering the first glimpse into how such a crucial economic sector might be run. At a meeting at the Iraqi Oil Ministry attended by top managers of the country's various oil facilities, Thamir Ghadhban was introduced as the new chief executive of the interim management team for the oil sector,...
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Oil industry executives summoned to Capitol Hill are expected to receive a grilling this week - perhaps unlike any they have received before - about their record profits at a time of high oil prices. But the questions won't just be coming from the usual critics. Some of the industry's traditional Republican allies are eager to show that they, too, share their constituents' anger over high prices and record profits. The hearing, ordered by Senate Republican leader Bill Frist of Tennessee, illustrates the political pressure that is driving Republicans to make a show of getting tough on an industry that has been a major source of GOP cash.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Obama administration's latest move to permit testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states is drawing flak from both environmentalists and the oil industry. Speaking at a lightly attended public hearing Wednesday afternoon in Annapolis, some residents said they feared the testing might hurt whales and dolphins, disrupt fishing and damage tourism. They also warned that the risks of a spill were too great to warrant even looking for oil. "Avoiding activities that will harm or kill any more marine mammals is significantly more important to me than succumbing to today's frenzied pressures to reduce gasoline prices by a mere 3 cents [er gallon]
NEWS
March 17, 2012
Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column on American energy independence is flawed in several respects ("Road to energy independence goes through ANWR and Keystone," March 11). He argues we need to drill for more oil, construct a distribution pipeline and open up more offshore wells. But the fact is that today the U.S. is awash in crude oil, in greater quantities than ever in our history. The problem isn't a shortage of crude oil but our limited capacity to refine it into gasoline, which has led to shortages and high prices.
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