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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
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NEWS
By Randy Kraft and Randy Kraft,ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL Additional research for this article provided by Sun librarian Bobby Schrott | March 2, 1997
PETROLEUM CENTER, Pa. -- The world changed here on Aug. 27, 1859, when Edwin L. Drake struck oil at a depth of 69.5 feet.Drake did not discover oil. People already knew about oil, but Drake was the first to find commercially viable quantities and spur an entirely new industry. He is called the founder of the modern petroleum industry.Thousands followed Drake into this valley, especially after the Civil War, building large oil boom towns, some of which are now ghost towns. By 1875, the oil field began to go dry.Folks at the Drake Well Museum in Pennsylvania's Oil Heritage Region maintain that what happened here did indeed change the world, far more than wars or revolutions, and that is why this area in northwestern Pennsylvania has been designated a Pennsylvania Heritage Park.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 18, 2013
While many have long seen America as the global bad boy, everybody likes Canada. If Uncle Sam tucks his pack of Marlboros under his T-shirt sleeve and plays by his own rules, the Canadian moose -- or whatever their Uncle Sam equivalent is -- always wears his blue blazer and school tie and does his chores without being asked. Canada is a global citizen, a good neighbor, a northern Puerto Rico with an EU sensibility that earns its gold stars from the United Nations every day. This fact should have relevance below the 49th parallel.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 24, 2002
JIDDA, Saudi Arabia - I could tell that Saudi Arabia had undergone a big change since I last visited when I checked into the Sheraton Hotel here and the desk clerk was a Saudi. Five years ago, the hotel owner would have been a Saudi but the clerks and key hotel personnel all would have been imported labor from the Philippines, Pakistan or Lebanon. Not anymore. Today, with the oil boom over, the Saudi economy can no longer afford the welfare net that once guaranteed every Saudi a government job. Since 1980, Saudi Arabia's population has exploded from 7 million to 19 million, thanks to one of the highest birthrates in the world and zero family planning.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 18, 2013
While many have long seen America as the global bad boy, everybody likes Canada. If Uncle Sam tucks his pack of Marlboros under his T-shirt sleeve and plays by his own rules, the Canadian moose -- or whatever their Uncle Sam equivalent is -- always wears his blue blazer and school tie and does his chores without being asked. Canada is a global citizen, a good neighbor, a northern Puerto Rico with an EU sensibility that earns its gold stars from the United Nations every day. This fact should have relevance below the 49th parallel.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 20, 2005
Nobody was better positioned for the great U.S. olive oil boom of the 1980s and 1990s than Pompeian Inc. Its oil, imported, blended and bottled on Baltimore's Pulaski Highway, was No. 1 in the United States a quarter-century back. Olive oil was about to be revealed as a source of healthy hearts and culinary delight, and sales were going to boom. But obscure young Brooklynite Bill Monroe stepped in front of the Pompeian parade. Monroe went to work for Italy's Bertolli family in 1981, played the olive oil craze like a Cremona fiddle, made Bertolli oil No. 1 in America and knocked Pompeian down to No. 4, with less than a fifth the sales of its rival.
NEWS
By Gady Epstein and Gady Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 2004
JINGBIAN, China - Consigned by geology to be among China's poorest farmers, the peasants in northern Shaanxi province, on the front porch of the Gobi Desert, hoped for a better life under the Communist Party, which made its base in this region during the revolution. The farmers' great chance finally came during the 1990s, when the state allowed them to take part in private oil drilling, an ambitious experiment in free enterprise in the undeveloped Chinese countryside. But when the experiment ended abruptly last year, it became a disaster for tens of thousands of farmers, a failure ordained this time by both geology and Communist rule.
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | May 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With gasoline prices averaging $3.21 for a gallon of regular nationwide over the Memorial Day weekend, traditional economic logic might suggest that this would be a good time to invest in new U.S. oil refineries and increase the supply of gasoline. Yet no new refinery has been built in the United States in three decades, only one is in the works and oil companies are scaling back planned investments in new, expanded or modernized U.S. refineries rather than increasing them.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 31, 2004
BEIJING -- Several times a year, Liu Shangqi dutifully leaves his comfortable life at home for trips to far-off countries on behalf of his employer, China National Petroleum Corp., China's largest oil company. A mild-mannered chief engineer, he does not go out of a sense of adventure. "I always feel nervous on these kinds of trips, because the local employees tell us the place isn't safe," said Liu, who recently spent a few weeks in Venezuela with Chinese workers who are there year-round to develop an oil field in service of China's worldwide quest for petroleum.
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | May 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With gasoline prices averaging $3.21 for a gallon of regular nationwide over the Memorial Day weekend, traditional economic logic might suggest that this would be a good time to invest in new U.S. oil refineries and increase the supply of gasoline. Yet no new refinery has been built in the United States in three decades, only one is in the works and oil companies are scaling back planned investments in new, expanded or modernized U.S. refineries rather than increasing them.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 20, 2005
Nobody was better positioned for the great U.S. olive oil boom of the 1980s and 1990s than Pompeian Inc. Its oil, imported, blended and bottled on Baltimore's Pulaski Highway, was No. 1 in the United States a quarter-century back. Olive oil was about to be revealed as a source of healthy hearts and culinary delight, and sales were going to boom. But obscure young Brooklynite Bill Monroe stepped in front of the Pompeian parade. Monroe went to work for Italy's Bertolli family in 1981, played the olive oil craze like a Cremona fiddle, made Bertolli oil No. 1 in America and knocked Pompeian down to No. 4, with less than a fifth the sales of its rival.
NEWS
By Gady Epstein and Gady Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 2004
JINGBIAN, China - Consigned by geology to be among China's poorest farmers, the peasants in northern Shaanxi province, on the front porch of the Gobi Desert, hoped for a better life under the Communist Party, which made its base in this region during the revolution. The farmers' great chance finally came during the 1990s, when the state allowed them to take part in private oil drilling, an ambitious experiment in free enterprise in the undeveloped Chinese countryside. But when the experiment ended abruptly last year, it became a disaster for tens of thousands of farmers, a failure ordained this time by both geology and Communist rule.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 31, 2004
BEIJING -- Several times a year, Liu Shangqi dutifully leaves his comfortable life at home for trips to far-off countries on behalf of his employer, China National Petroleum Corp., China's largest oil company. A mild-mannered chief engineer, he does not go out of a sense of adventure. "I always feel nervous on these kinds of trips, because the local employees tell us the place isn't safe," said Liu, who recently spent a few weeks in Venezuela with Chinese workers who are there year-round to develop an oil field in service of China's worldwide quest for petroleum.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 24, 2002
JIDDA, Saudi Arabia - I could tell that Saudi Arabia had undergone a big change since I last visited when I checked into the Sheraton Hotel here and the desk clerk was a Saudi. Five years ago, the hotel owner would have been a Saudi but the clerks and key hotel personnel all would have been imported labor from the Philippines, Pakistan or Lebanon. Not anymore. Today, with the oil boom over, the Saudi economy can no longer afford the welfare net that once guaranteed every Saudi a government job. Since 1980, Saudi Arabia's population has exploded from 7 million to 19 million, thanks to one of the highest birthrates in the world and zero family planning.
NEWS
By Randy Kraft and Randy Kraft,ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL Additional research for this article provided by Sun librarian Bobby Schrott | March 2, 1997
PETROLEUM CENTER, Pa. -- The world changed here on Aug. 27, 1859, when Edwin L. Drake struck oil at a depth of 69.5 feet.Drake did not discover oil. People already knew about oil, but Drake was the first to find commercially viable quantities and spur an entirely new industry. He is called the founder of the modern petroleum industry.Thousands followed Drake into this valley, especially after the Civil War, building large oil boom towns, some of which are now ghost towns. By 1875, the oil field began to go dry.Folks at the Drake Well Museum in Pennsylvania's Oil Heritage Region maintain that what happened here did indeed change the world, far more than wars or revolutions, and that is why this area in northwestern Pennsylvania has been designated a Pennsylvania Heritage Park.
NEWS
October 28, 1992
No sooner did word arrive that Coca-Cola was bringing 700 jobs to the state than two Coca-Colas left -- or the equivalent of them, at least.The recent announcement that Westinghouse Electric Corp. is laying off 12 percent of its 12,000-strong work force in Maryland -- layoff notices are to go out beginning Friday -- sent waves of fear and anxiety reverberating across this region. The layoffs may affect the company's units in Linthicum, where 9,500 people work; Hunt Valley (1,800); Annapolis (750)
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1991
DENVER -- A settlement is expected this week in a $200 million U.S. government suit in the Silverado savings and loan case that may allow Neil Bush to put behind him the scandal that tarnished his reputation and proved a political embarrassment to his father.Assuming both sides accept it, the deal could also close the Denver chapter of the younger Mr. Bush's life.Apex Energy Co., an oil exploration company headed by Mr. Bush, announced two weeks ago that he had resigned as an officer. His family's home in an exclusive subdivision is up for sale.
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