Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOil And Gas
IN THE NEWS

Oil And Gas

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Commentator Donald F. Boesch provided an inspiring account of Maryland's commitment to our environment ( "It's not too late," July 24). Recently, however, I was surprised by a dramatically underexposed issue: Seismic air gun testing. This particularly destructive type of testing is used by oil companies to prospect for oil offshore. Not only does the testing harm marine mammals and other ocean life, but it is also a gateway to even more destructive oil drilling. I doubt that Maryland's action plan will address air gun testing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Eight Democratic members of Maryland's congressional delegation wrote President Obama Monday urging him to reconsider his administration's plan to allow seismic testing for oil and gas off the mid-Atlantic coast. In a jointly signed letter, the eight called seismic testing the first major step toward opening the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, which carries the risk of oil spills. But they warned that the tests themselves would be "incredibly harmful to marine mammals and fisheries in the region," generating "dynamite-like" blasts of compressed air underwater that could hurt whales, dolphins and fish.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
NEWS
November 24, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Los Angeles Times editorial, which was published Friday.THE states of the Caspian Sea region are rich in energy resources and eager to maintain the independence from Moscow.The West wants to diversify its sources of oil and natural gas and at the same time try to head off a reassertion of Russian dominance in Central Asia.These interests have now joined in the proposed construction, with U.S. financial help, of oil and gas pipelines from Azerbaijan to Turkey.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 1, 2001
"Energy stocks have appeal these days," says the S&P Outlook. "The industry's highly favorable fundamentals provide good buying opportunity. The current boom should last another three to five years, thanks to oil and natural gas demand rising at an expected rate of more than 2 percent annually, with limited oil and gas production capacity." The article suggests these stocks: BJ Services Co., Exxon Mobil Corp., Nabors Industries Inc., Rowan Cos. Inc. and Santa Fe International Corp. GOOD ADVICE: Here are "Lifetime Investment Rules" from Nightly Business Report (PBS)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration will give the oil and gas industry two years to comply with a storm water regulation that goes into effect tomorrow, and it will consider granting the industry a permanent exemption. Environmental groups and environmentalists in Congress criticized this as granting special rights to a favored industry, at the risk of polluting the nation's rivers and lakes. The administration said it needs more time to determine the impact the rule would have on the industry and whether it should be applied to production and exploration for oil and gas. The rule orders builders and others whose construction projects cover anywhere from 1 acre to 5 acres to get the permission of state or federal officials before beginning the work.
NEWS
July 19, 1998
Retired Col. Rex Applegate,84, a military tactics expert with an international reputation for his knowledge of riot control, counter- terrorism and combat techniques, died Tuesday of pneumonia, stroke and heart disease in Roseburg, Ore. He was a commando in Nazi-occupied France during World War II and was one of the first people assigned to the Office of Strategic Services, which became the CIA.Robert Gorham Davis,90, a literary critic and professor emeritus...
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | February 19, 1992
Baker HughesRemaining profitable in a shrinking industry is no mean trick, but it's what Baker Hughes (NYSE, BHI, $18.625) has done in the oil service sector, says United & Babson Investment Report."
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Thanks for Nancy Unger's article on Rachel Carson, whose research was denounced in the popular press, dismissed as hysterical, and considered by some to reflect communist sympathies ("'Silent Spring' still echoes," Sept. 16). Carson's story doesn't sound that different from the way scientists who study climate change are treated today. The popular press feels compelled to "balance" the reporting of scientific results with quotes from pseudo-scientists hired by Big Oil. Even though climate scientists have often understated the severity of climate change, their results are similarly dismissed as exaggerated and apocalyptic.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Commentator Donald F. Boesch provided an inspiring account of Maryland's commitment to our environment ( "It's not too late," July 24). Recently, however, I was surprised by a dramatically underexposed issue: Seismic air gun testing. This particularly destructive type of testing is used by oil companies to prospect for oil offshore. Not only does the testing harm marine mammals and other ocean life, but it is also a gateway to even more destructive oil drilling. I doubt that Maryland's action plan will address air gun testing.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 16, 2013
Seismic testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states could cause widespread harm to whales, dolphins, sea turtles and fish, as well as to fishing and tourism, an environmental group warned Tuesday. Oceana said the federal government's own environmental impact statement estimates 138,500 whales and dolphins could be injured if seismic "airguns," which generate blasts of noise underwater, are used to explore for oil and gas along the Atlantic coast.  The Department of Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is weighing applications to conduct offshore seismic testing from Delaware to Florida.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
We wish to recognize the leadership of U.S. Senators Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin on behalf of the Land and Water Conservation Fund. LWCF is the program that ensures Maryland has the resources our parks, forests, and wildlife areas need to provide opportunities for outdoor recreation and to strengthen our economy. If you enjoy visiting a neighborhood or state park, the odds are that the fund helped to make this possible. LWCF has also preserved for future generations the experiences of canoeing Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge's water trails, visiting Antietam National Battlefield, and camping at Assateague Island National Seashore.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
Rep. Eric Cantor, the number two Republican in the Congress, has now joined his leader, House Speaker John Boehner, in calling for President Barack Obama's health reform law to be put on the table in the debate over how to avoid the fiscal cliff. Until now , the two issues were pretty clear: Increased tax revenue from the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans in return for cutting entitlement programs. Adding Obamacare to the mix is a classic negotiating tactic. When you are losing the negotiation, put another chip on the table.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Thanks for Nancy Unger's article on Rachel Carson, whose research was denounced in the popular press, dismissed as hysterical, and considered by some to reflect communist sympathies ("'Silent Spring' still echoes," Sept. 16). Carson's story doesn't sound that different from the way scientists who study climate change are treated today. The popular press feels compelled to "balance" the reporting of scientific results with quotes from pseudo-scientists hired by Big Oil. Even though climate scientists have often understated the severity of climate change, their results are similarly dismissed as exaggerated and apocalyptic.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Obama administration's latest move to permit testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states is drawing flak from both environmentalists and the oil industry. Speaking at a lightly attended public hearing Wednesday afternoon in Annapolis, some residents said they feared the testing might hurt whales and dolphins, disrupt fishing and damage tourism. They also warned that the risks of a spill were too great to warrant even looking for oil. "Avoiding activities that will harm or kill any more marine mammals is significantly more important to me than succumbing to today's frenzied pressures to reduce gasoline prices by a mere 3 cents [er gallon]
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 16, 2013
Seismic testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states could cause widespread harm to whales, dolphins, sea turtles and fish, as well as to fishing and tourism, an environmental group warned Tuesday. Oceana said the federal government's own environmental impact statement estimates 138,500 whales and dolphins could be injured if seismic "airguns," which generate blasts of noise underwater, are used to explore for oil and gas along the Atlantic coast.  The Department of Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is weighing applications to conduct offshore seismic testing from Delaware to Florida.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
Editor: All right, this is it. I have truly had enough. I cannot figure out how anyone in their right mind would think that a gasoline tax would be beneficial in any way to Marylanders. The poor and downtrodden already are having a difficult time finding and maintaining a job. How is making the "getting to it more difficult" going to help anyone? Should Marylanders sacrifice food and/or shelter so that they can get to work, only to come home to a box because they can't now pay rent or a mortgage?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.