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By Luke Broadwater | March 28, 2011
President Barack Obama's speech Tuesday night about the military action in Libya was composed of 3,362 words. But there were two words conspicuously absent from the 30-minute address: "Oil" and "energy. " Back in the day, when politicians didn't use word like "interest" -- a word that appeared six times in Obama's speech -- as a euphemism, they spoke more plainly.  A quick history lesson (I know, I know, but I promise I'll keep this short): When Europeans were divvying up the deceased Ottoman Empire after World War I, they spoke openly of the desire to control oil fields as their reason for interest in African and Middle Eastern countries.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
David R. Millard, an oil company executive who was a co-founder of the Chesapeake Oil Co., died Aug. 15 at Stella Maris Hospice of cancer. He was 88. The son of Junius Samuel Millard, a pharmacist, and Marian Bentley Millard, girl's athletic director at Friends School, David Rockwell Millard was born in Baltimore and raised in the Armagh Village neighborhood of Baltimore County. Mr. Millard's paternal grandfather, David Rockwell Millard, was one of the pharmacists who founded the old Morgan & Millard Inc. pharmacy in the Roland Park Shopping Center, which is now the site of the Petit Louis Restaurant.
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NEWS
May 18, 2010
Watching the unfathomable ecological and human disaster occurring in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the tragic loss of the Deepwater Horizon platform and subsequent leaking of massive amounts of crude oil and gas, I can't help but feel somewhat overwhelmed by the cost to the people of the Gulf States and of the planet from our addiction to oil. Disasters of this sort occur when people try to control complex systems and fail. These grand mistakes are not at all restricted to oil drilling and production but include nuclear energy, chemical plants, aviation and even the human space flight program.
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
How can it have been 38 years since Heart's “Magic Man” became an FM radio staple? Saturday night at Pier Six Pavilion, before a near-sold-out house, the Wilson sisters - lead singer Ann with guitarist Nancy - and their band's latest incarnation played a tight, straight-ahead 90-minute set short on spontaneity and surprises, but plenty long on the propulsive rock 'n' roll that earned Heart a place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Their fans clearly loved it, and for good reason: this was classic rock with an oomph, a well-oiled hit machine that shows little sign of wearing down anytime soon.
NEWS
June 16, 2010
Nearly two months into the environmental disaster triggered by BP's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, President Barack Obama made his first-ever address from the Oval Office last night in an effort to convince Americans that the government is doing enough to protect coastal areas and the livelihoods of residents threatened by the crisis. He sought to convince the public that the federal government is and has been in control and that BP will be held financially responsible, but the weakest part of his speech was the most important: the call for the United States to reduce, and eventually eliminate, our dependence on oil. Although he devoted the conclusion of his speech to the topic, he offered no more than an admonition that the nation must reduce its addiction to fossil fuels and an offer that he's open to suggestions for how to do so. The first order of business for the president appears to be convincing the public that he is in charge.
NEWS
January 12, 2003
LET'S TAKE a look at oil. It's the one crucial ingredient in the world's economy, and two-thirds of the world's oil is in the region surrounding the Persian Gulf. Both the United States and Great Britain deny that the crisis over Iraq is about oil - but there's no question that the future of the oil business will be profoundly affected by what happens there in the months to come. The key, of course, is Saudi Arabia, with its giant reserves. For several years now, American policy-makers have been growing increasingly concerned about the Saudi connection.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
With oil from the Gulf of Mexico spill now reaching major ocean currents, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski asked the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Wednesday to assess the threat to the Chesapeake Bay and the waters off Maryland. "The immediate impact on the communities closest to the spill is obvious," the Maryland Democrat wrote in a letter to NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco. "But my constituents are also asking – will they see oil on the beaches of Ocean City?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 26, 2010
Two people were injured when a tanker truck overturned in northern Baltimore County, according to the Baltimore County Fire Department. County firefighters responded at 8:20 a.m. to the 3600 block of Blemheim Road in Phoenix, a spokeswoman said. The tanker was delivering heating oil to a house, and firefighters found the truck on its side leaking oil. Hazardous material crews were called, and the Maryland Department of the Environment was contacted to stop the leak. Two patients were taken to Sinai Hospital.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Baltimore-based Pompeian Inc. has become the first olive oil maker to have the quality of its products backed by the United States Department of Agriculture, the company announced. The manufacturer has obtained approval for its extra virgin and extra virgin organic olive oils through the USDA's Quality Monitoring Program, which tests products to verify purity and quality. To enter the USDA program, Pompeian agreed to unannounced visits and testing of product samples. The product verification will allow the privately owned company to start placing a USDA logo on its products this month and will give consumers additional assurances, said David Bensadoun, chief executive officer of Pompeian.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
I feel so reassured knowing that we have the advanced technology to locate oil deep below the surface of the ocean floor (remember the T.V. commercials?). Yet,the remote controlled submersible vehicles being deployed in the Gulf oil well blow-out are unable to even locate a 450 ton valve of the blow-out preventer, and when they do, they can't even make it operate, when it was suppose to operate automatically when the blow-out occurred. Gee, I wonder if it was ever tested since it was first installed.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Eight Democratic members of Maryland's congressional delegation wrote President Obama Monday urging him to reconsider his administration's plan to allow seismic testing for oil and gas off the mid-Atlantic coast. In a jointly signed letter, the eight called seismic testing the first major step toward opening the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, which carries the risk of oil spills. But they warned that the tests themselves would be "incredibly harmful to marine mammals and fisheries in the region," generating "dynamite-like" blasts of compressed air underwater that could hurt whales, dolphins and fish.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
Getting regular maintenance for your car does not have an immediate impact on the performance of the vehicle, so it's easy to put off. Deciding not to change the oil or rotate the tires seems to have no effect other than to save money. What County Executive David Craig has been doing to Harford County since he took over has been analogous to driving a car without getting the oil changed. He has submitted a budget that for the 7th year in a row fails to provide his employees with even a cost of living increase.
NEWS
By John K. Delaney | April 2, 2014
In the context of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and a still stagnant economy, President Barack Obama faces two important questions on energy transmission: a decision on the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline and the question of increasing American natural gas exports. These are choices that will resonate from Crimea to Cove Point. In my judgment, the president should reject Keystone and step up natural gas exports. Here's why. The right analytical framework for these decisions has several component questions: what's consistent with our environmental and energy policy objectives, what's in our economic self-interest, and what serves our geopolitical goals.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The owner of a College Park waste collection business pleaded guilty Monday to transporting stolen property as part of a scheme to steal waste vegetable oil, the U.S. attorney's office announced. Ahmad Qaabid Abdul-Rahim, 37, admitted in a plea agreement entered in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to receiving nearly $99,000 for selling more than 94,000 gallons of stolen waste vegetable oil during a nine-month period last year. Abdul-Rahim, who according to the plea agreement once played football at the University of Maryland, acknowledged that he and a friend first stole waste vegetable oil in 2010 from restaurants in Prince George's County, Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia.
NEWS
November 2, 1991
Big Oil, after a 10-year stalemate, has lost its fight, at least for now, for drilling rights in the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve in Alaska. Environmentalists, making ANWR their driving wedge to block energy legislation they decried as the handiwork of the petroleum, coal and nuclear power industries, resorted to a Senate filibuster to win the day. They had the support of both Maryland senators. Fifty senators, half the membership, wanted to push the measure to passage, but they lacked the 60 votes needed to cut off debate.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | March 31, 2014
Step into the Secolari shop at The Mall in Columbia, and you'll feel as though you're in a Tuscan farmhouse rather than a suburban shopping center. The walls are lined with stainless-steel containers, called fusti, filled with 20 different olive oils and 14 types of vinegar and aged balsamic. There's bread for sampling, along with other gourmet items proffered on rustic wooden tables designed by the store owners and made by a local lumber company. Champagne mimosa vinegar, basil-flavored olive oil, pear ginger wasabi balsamic, blackberry with roasted pepper vinegar and blood orange olive oil are some of Secolari's most unusual and popular flavors.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Baltimore County police say a Middle River resident acted quickly to stop a gunman during a recent home invasion. Police said four people forced open a door to the house, in the 100 block of Alberge Lane, at around 12:30 a.m. Feb. 21. One would-be robber armed with a single-barrel rifle, confronted an occupant, police said. The resident disarmed the suspect by throwing cold cooking oil on him. Two other residents came to aide of the first, and together they were able to detain two of the suspects, police said.
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