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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
In addition to being known for a variety of architectural designs, many of the homes in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood are often referred to by the names of their former residents of note. Within the space of a few acres, the community includes the Milton Eisenhower house, the Turnbull House and the "Natty Boh" place. Five years ago, Bari and Thomas Fore purchased the Ogden Nash home, a three-story, stone and slate English country-style home sitting on an acre of land, for $1.2 million.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
The letters keep coming, sometimes 20 a month asking for Dennis Gaubatz's autograph. Sometimes it's a football card that the old Colt receives. More often, it's the cover of one of the three national magazines on which Gaubatz appeared in his five years as the rugged middle linebacker on Baltimore's ballyhooed defense of the 1960s. How many copies of Life and Sports Illustrated does he reckon he's signed? "My gawd, I have no idea. But they just don't stop," said Gaubatz, 73, from his home in West Columbia, Texas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | June 12, 2005
With Billie By Julia Blackburn. Pantheon Books. 354 pages. $25. A young woman named Linda Kuehl jumped out of a hotel window in Washington on a snowy night in January 1979. Among the things she left behind were taped interviews with about 150 people who knew, or claimed to know, Billie Holiday, along with a jumble of police records, shopping lists, royalty statements and similar ephemera from the life of the nonpareil jazz singer. Kuehl could never form her raw research into the biography she hoped to write of Holiday, who grew up in Baltimore and first began to sing here.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
In addition to being known for a variety of architectural designs, many of the homes in Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood are often referred to by the names of their former residents of note. Within the space of a few acres, the community includes the Milton Eisenhower house, the Turnbull House and the "Natty Boh" place. Five years ago, Bari and Thomas Fore purchased the Ogden Nash home, a three-story, stone and slate English country-style home sitting on an acre of land, for $1.2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and By Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | August 18, 2002
We all know Ogden Nash observed that candy is dandy but liquor is quicker and insisted that we should speak low when we speak love. But Skolpaddan skyddar njurar och mjalte? Who gnu? The Swedish translation of Ogden Nash arrives just in time for his 100th birthday anniversary tomorrow. "Skolpaddan" seems to be "The Turtle," the quatrain in which Nash celebrates the turtle's ingenious fertility. The turtle lives 'twixt plated decks Which practically conceal its sex. I think it clever of the turtle In such a fix to be so fertile.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh | July 26, 2004
"The firefly's flame," Ogden Nash observed, "is something for which science has no name." While that was true enough when the Baltimore poet penned that ode in 1937, today's researchers have come to understand a great deal about the celebrated twilight twinkling of these misnamed members of the beetle clan. Like cicada song, firefly flickering is an instrument of seduction: expression of availability and desire reduced to a precise sequence of pyrotechnic bursts. How fireflies generate these bursts remained a mystery until 1953, when American biochemist Arda Alden Green stumbled on a chemical called luciferase in light-producing cells on the insect's abdomen.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | August 19, 2002
OGDEN NASH, 100 years out, is doing very well, thank you. Fine tributes to his memory -- first that two-page spread in The New Yorker and now a lawn party today -- his birthday -- at his former Guilford home, to introduce a U.S. postage stamp bearing his face. But this was a man who made his living largely from author advances and royalties. So the smile on his ghost right now may be in response to yet another honor -- a quiet, bookish one. Some authors produce sentences, paragraphs, chapters; Ogden Nash wrote lines of verse, distinctive here for the merriment, there for the rhymes.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
Frances Leonard Nash, the widow of poet Ogden Nash, died Wednesday of Myelodysplasia at her Roland Park Place residence where she had lived since 1983. She was 88.Born Frances Rider Leonard in Salisbury, she was the granddaughter of Maryland Gov. Elihu Jackson and spent her childhood traveling with her family.She attended Calvert School and Roland Park Country School and graduated from Great Barrington School in New England in 1924. She briefly attended Vassar College before returning to Baltimore where she devoted her time outside the home to charitable causes.
FEATURES
By Frances R. Smith and Frances R. Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
Honor: The U.S. Postal Service unveils today a draft of the commemorative stamp of Ogden Nash that will be released next year on the 100th anniversary of his birth. A granddaughter offers a remembrance of the poet-writer and the photo that inspired artist Michael Deas' rendition of the stamp. Until I took on the task of helping settle my late grandmother's estate in 1994, the name Ogden Nash simply meant the kind and gentle man who was my grandfather. It meant the man who cooked wonderful steaks at summer cook-outs, the man who read Kipling, Tolkien and Arthur Conan Doyle aloud to his grandchildren while they drew and colored pictures.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 17, 1993
Pieces of column too short to use . . .Hot air . . . Message on the hand dryer in the men's room of the world-famous Bel-Loc Diner: "To hear a message from your congressman, press button below."*Forgive me, Ogden Nash . . . 'Tis lost on those of us/ Who find preposterous/ How Boogie thinks a team/ Could be called Rhinoceros.*I am curious . . . Got a quick question: When you first saw the jump-cut, hot-action TV commercial promoting a certain new movie featuring Harrison Ford as a man-on-the-run named Dr. Richard Kimball, how many of you, before hearing the title, thought the film was based on a true crime story from the '60s?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 28, 2007
Theodore G. Bloom, a retired Maryland Court of Special Appeals judge known for opinions peppered with literary references, died of pancreatic cancer complications Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 81 and lived in Annapolis. "He was a beloved figure in the Maryland judiciary," said Joseph F. Murphy, chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals. "His mind was razor-sharp, and he quoted beautifully from poetry and song. He was a real scholar with an appreciation for literature."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | June 12, 2005
With Billie By Julia Blackburn. Pantheon Books. 354 pages. $25. A young woman named Linda Kuehl jumped out of a hotel window in Washington on a snowy night in January 1979. Among the things she left behind were taped interviews with about 150 people who knew, or claimed to know, Billie Holiday, along with a jumble of police records, shopping lists, royalty statements and similar ephemera from the life of the nonpareil jazz singer. Kuehl could never form her raw research into the biography she hoped to write of Holiday, who grew up in Baltimore and first began to sing here.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh | July 26, 2004
"The firefly's flame," Ogden Nash observed, "is something for which science has no name." While that was true enough when the Baltimore poet penned that ode in 1937, today's researchers have come to understand a great deal about the celebrated twilight twinkling of these misnamed members of the beetle clan. Like cicada song, firefly flickering is an instrument of seduction: expression of availability and desire reduced to a precise sequence of pyrotechnic bursts. How fireflies generate these bursts remained a mystery until 1953, when American biochemist Arda Alden Green stumbled on a chemical called luciferase in light-producing cells on the insect's abdomen.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | August 19, 2002
OGDEN NASH, 100 years out, is doing very well, thank you. Fine tributes to his memory -- first that two-page spread in The New Yorker and now a lawn party today -- his birthday -- at his former Guilford home, to introduce a U.S. postage stamp bearing his face. But this was a man who made his living largely from author advances and royalties. So the smile on his ghost right now may be in response to yet another honor -- a quiet, bookish one. Some authors produce sentences, paragraphs, chapters; Ogden Nash wrote lines of verse, distinctive here for the merriment, there for the rhymes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and By Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | August 18, 2002
We all know Ogden Nash observed that candy is dandy but liquor is quicker and insisted that we should speak low when we speak love. But Skolpaddan skyddar njurar och mjalte? Who gnu? The Swedish translation of Ogden Nash arrives just in time for his 100th birthday anniversary tomorrow. "Skolpaddan" seems to be "The Turtle," the quatrain in which Nash celebrates the turtle's ingenious fertility. The turtle lives 'twixt plated decks Which practically conceal its sex. I think it clever of the turtle In such a fix to be so fertile.
FEATURES
By Frances R. Smith and Frances R. Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
Honor: The U.S. Postal Service unveils today a draft of the commemorative stamp of Ogden Nash that will be released next year on the 100th anniversary of his birth. A granddaughter offers a remembrance of the poet-writer and the photo that inspired artist Michael Deas' rendition of the stamp. Until I took on the task of helping settle my late grandmother's estate in 1994, the name Ogden Nash simply meant the kind and gentle man who was my grandfather. It meant the man who cooked wonderful steaks at summer cook-outs, the man who read Kipling, Tolkien and Arthur Conan Doyle aloud to his grandchildren while they drew and colored pictures.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
The letters keep coming, sometimes 20 a month asking for Dennis Gaubatz's autograph. Sometimes it's a football card that the old Colt receives. More often, it's the cover of one of the three national magazines on which Gaubatz appeared in his five years as the rugged middle linebacker on Baltimore's ballyhooed defense of the 1960s. How many copies of Life and Sports Illustrated does he reckon he's signed? "My gawd, I have no idea. But they just don't stop," said Gaubatz, 73, from his home in West Columbia, Texas.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 28, 2007
Theodore G. Bloom, a retired Maryland Court of Special Appeals judge known for opinions peppered with literary references, died of pancreatic cancer complications Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 81 and lived in Annapolis. "He was a beloved figure in the Maryland judiciary," said Joseph F. Murphy, chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals. "His mind was razor-sharp, and he quoted beautifully from poetry and song. He was a real scholar with an appreciation for literature."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
Frances Leonard Nash, the widow of poet Ogden Nash, died Wednesday of Myelodysplasia at her Roland Park Place residence where she had lived since 1983. She was 88.Born Frances Rider Leonard in Salisbury, she was the granddaughter of Maryland Gov. Elihu Jackson and spent her childhood traveling with her family.She attended Calvert School and Roland Park Country School and graduated from Great Barrington School in New England in 1924. She briefly attended Vassar College before returning to Baltimore where she devoted her time outside the home to charitable causes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 17, 1993
Pieces of column too short to use . . .Hot air . . . Message on the hand dryer in the men's room of the world-famous Bel-Loc Diner: "To hear a message from your congressman, press button below."*Forgive me, Ogden Nash . . . 'Tis lost on those of us/ Who find preposterous/ How Boogie thinks a team/ Could be called Rhinoceros.*I am curious . . . Got a quick question: When you first saw the jump-cut, hot-action TV commercial promoting a certain new movie featuring Harrison Ford as a man-on-the-run named Dr. Richard Kimball, how many of you, before hearing the title, thought the film was based on a true crime story from the '60s?
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