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NEWS
March 25, 1994
Should English be the "official" language of Maryland? That's the question being considered by the General Assembly this session in what has become an annual ritual in Annapolis. Efforts by U.S. English, the lobbying group pushing the measure, to make English the "official" language of state and local PTC government in Maryland have gotten nowhere in the past. But this year a bill to put the question to voters on a referendum in November made it out of committee onto the House of Delegates floor.
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NEWS
January 27, 2013
On Thursday, Carroll County Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who has quite possibly the most ironic first name since Roscoe P. Coltrane named his Basset Hound "Flash" (Dukes of Carroll?), said, "Throughout our history, we have had waves of immigrants coming to this country and they have all assimilated to use a common language, and I think that's why we've become the world's leading superpower. " ("Carroll names English its official language," Jan. 25.) Let's be honest. "Official language" is really a euphemism for keeping Carroll County as homogeneous as possible.
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NEWS
September 28, 2012
The Carroll County commissioners who want to make English the official language of the county forget that German was spoken in the county as much as English during its first hundred years or so ("Carroll commissioners might make English official language," Sept. 26). Also, after the Native American languages, Spanish was the first language in the continental U.S. I don't like the racist posturing. MaryAnn H. Gregory, Westminster
EXPLORE
November 10, 2012
The Board of County Commissioners has rescheduled its public hearing on the proposal to designate English as the official language of Carroll County to Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. in the County Office Building, 225 North Center St., Westminster. The hearing had been scheduled for late October, but was postponed because of Hurricane Sandy. This ordinance, if passed, would recognize English as the language in which all official county business will be conducted. After the hearing, the commissioners may make amendments to the proposed ordinance based on the comments received.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
A Carroll County commissioner has drafted legislation that would make English the county's official language — and if it passes, Carroll would become the third Maryland locality to enact such legislation this year, following Frederick and Queen Anne's counties. Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who represents the Hampstead area, said he will ask his colleagues to introduce the proposal at the board's session Thursday. If they are amenable, a public hearing would be scheduled before a vote.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
On Thursday, Carroll County Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who has quite possibly the most ironic first name since Roscoe P. Coltrane named his Basset Hound "Flash" (Dukes of Carroll?), said, "Throughout our history, we have had waves of immigrants coming to this country and they have all assimilated to use a common language, and I think that's why we've become the world's leading superpower. " ("Carroll names English its official language," Jan. 25.) Let's be honest. "Official language" is really a euphemism for keeping Carroll County as homogeneous as possible.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 5, 1995
INDIANAPOLIS -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole called yesterday for an end to most bilingual education and denounced new proposed standards for teaching history as he sought to cast his presidential bid as a defense of the nation's cultural heritage against divisive assaults by Washington and "intellectual elites."Attacking what he called the "embarrassed-to-be-American crowd," the leading candidate for the GOP presidential nomination told the 77th national convention of the American Legion that "if we are to return this country to greatness, we must do more than restore America's defenses."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole's decision to jump on the bandwagon to make English the nation's official language underscores the political mischievousness in this seemingly common-sense notion.What could be harmful in requiring all Americans to learn and use the misidentified "native tongue" of their country? Dole's argument that "with all the divisive forces tearing at our country, we need the glue of language to hold us together" seems the soul of reason.But the idea that the nation somehow lacks sufficient "glue" from other sources, including commitment to its loftiest ideals and its history of ethnic assimilation, smacks of a discouraging retrenchment from the old "melting pot" image of America.
NEWS
By Kerry A. White and Kerry A. White,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House opened debate yesterday on several measures that would make English the nation's official language, an initiative that promises to face a bumpy road in Congress.All the proposals stress the need for an official national language as a "common bond" or "glue" to "hold the nation together" and assert that a "multilingual government" perpetuates a socially divisive society.The bill with the most co-sponsors, introduced by Rep. Bill Emerson, a Missouri Republican, and Sen. Richard C. Shelby, an Alabama Republican, would not affect federal bilingual education programs, as some other bills would.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | November 8, 2006
A proposal to make the small Carroll County city of Taneytown the first in Maryland with English as its official language has drawn fire from critics who say it might violate state law. The resolution, scheduled for discussion by the City Council tonight and possibly for a vote Monday, was submitted by Councilman Paul Chamberlain Jr. It would require all city government business to be conducted in English. "Most people are not aware that English isn't the official language of the United States," Chamberlain said yesterday.
EXPLORE
October 20, 2012
The Board of County Commissioners will hold its public hearing on Tuesday, Oct. 30, regarding the proposal to designate English as the official language of Carroll County. The hearing will be held at 7 p.m. at the New Windsor Community Building, Community Meeting Room, 1100 Green Valley Road, New Windsor. This ordinance, if passed, would recognize English as the language in which all official county business will be conducted. The ordinance, as proposed, can be read HERE Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who sponsored the legislation, said in a statement that it would "ensure that all official county business is conducted in English, which will save the county money, simplify county communications and provide incentives to learn English to those living in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Amid the quaint brick storefronts of Westminster's Main Street, Lily's Mexican Market sells Virgin of Guadalupe statues, sacks of dried beans and paddle-shaped cactus leaves. A mile away, the aisles of Las Palmeras grocery store are stocked with Salvadoran cheeses and pastries. A nearby Catholic church draws more than 200 people to a Spanish Mass each Sunday. Mexican and Central American immigrants have flocked to Carroll County over the past decade, drawn by pastures and orchards that remind them of the rural villages in which they were raised.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
The Carroll County commissioners who want to make English the official language of the county forget that German was spoken in the county as much as English during its first hundred years or so ("Carroll commissioners might make English official language," Sept. 26). Also, after the Native American languages, Spanish was the first language in the continental U.S. I don't like the racist posturing. MaryAnn H. Gregory, Westminster
NEWS
September 25, 2012
The commissioners of Carroll County, Maryland, are solemnly considering a measure to make English the official language of their county , following the examples of Frederick County and Queen Anne's County.  Perhaps the best that can be said of the measure is that it will do little or no harm, having little practical effect. Federal and state regulations will remain unaffected, and likely most business practices too. The shelves of Carroll County shops will continue to carry products with bilingual English/Spanish labeling, English/French when they come from Canada.  It is a measure that addresses an evil that does not exist.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
A Carroll County commissioner has drafted legislation that would make English the county's official language — and if it passes, Carroll would become the third Maryland locality to enact such legislation this year, following Frederick and Queen Anne's counties. Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who represents the Hampstead area, said he will ask his colleagues to introduce the proposal at the board's session Thursday. If they are amenable, a public hearing would be scheduled before a vote.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Janet Byron Anderson (@janetbyronander) tweeted this morning, "Tell someone you're a linguist and they say, 'Oops! Better watch my language'. Please don't watch it. We value your syllables. " English majors and copy editors, when they are incautious enough to identify themselves in public, get the same half-embarrassed, half-defiant response. Really, you should talk as you like. That's your right. Sweet land of liberty. No effort to establish an English Academy has ever gotten anywhere, and all such efforts amount to nothing more than magnets for cranks.
NEWS
By Kerry A. White | October 15, 1995
A CAMPAIGN to declare English the official national language is gaining momentum in the Republican-led Congress and has become a hot political topic for Washington's heavy hitters and 1996 presidential hopefuls.While the majority of Americans are proficient in English, there has never been a federal law establishing English as the official language of the United States. And yet the language has survived through more than nearly 400 years of immigration.According to the Census Bureau, the percentage of foreign-born people in the United States has been growing at a record pace.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
As an immigrant who supports the unifying role of the English language, I am deeply offended at the way in which The Baltimore Sun presented a recent news story detailing what was twice referred to as "racist" legislation to make English the official language of certain county governments in Maryland ("Maryland counties seek to make English official language," Marcy 11). The piece had strong antagonistic undertones that served only to perpetuate false beliefs about the Official English movement.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
While I am in The Boot, waiting for the chipped bone in my foot to knit its way back on board, and testing my wife's patience as she drives me back and forth to campus and the paragraph factory,* I am, as you must also be, searching for innocent amusement. Here is some.  The Economist , bless its heart, has produced a little animated selection of style guidelines , illustrated delightfully by KAL . Brush up on rack and wrack .  Stan Carey comments on the polysemy (tendency of words to develop multiple meanings)
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