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NEWS
By Scott Dance, Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita A. Levy wrote an apology letter to his wife before wrapping a plastic bag around his head Monday and pumping it with helium, killing himself in the basement of his Towson-area home, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the investigation. Along with the letter, he left behind multiple hard drives, computers and servers that police have seized and are scrutinizing, police said. More than 300 of Levy's current and former patients have contacted officers, fearing that they are pictured in images he is accused of secretly capturing, Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
R&B singer Mario, the Baltimore-born performer whose struggle with his heroin-addicted mother formed the basis of an MTV documentary, was arrested early Friday after she told police that he struck her and destroyed their Fells Point apartment. The 24-year-old, whose full name is Mario Dewar Barrett, was charged with one count of second-degree assault and released after posting $50,000 bond. An attorney representing the singer called the arrest "an unfortunate incident between a loving son and a mother who continues to struggle with a devastating addiction.
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Montgomery County Judge Richard E. Jordan was so appalled by the actions of former Baltimore Police Officer Alec Taylor that he went outside sentencing guidelines to order the man committed to jail for a year - four times the maximum recommendation of three months. Mr. Taylor's crime? Beating a dog to death. The facts of the case are pretty horrific. The officer pummeled "Rocko," a tiny Jack Russell terrier, with a mop, choked him and left him lying on the floor all because the pup had soiled a rug. Mr. Taylor then sent a girlfriend a series of unemotional text messages about the beating, including this one: "Yeah I think he's pretty much dead.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Police officers convicted of a crime in Maryland and sentenced to state prison are typically housed in segregated areas for their safety, far from most other inmates. But those prosecuted in U.S. District Court and sent to federal prison - like the 15 Baltimore officers recently convicted in a kickback scheme - will, for the most part, be thrown in with the rest of the convicts. "Whether [inmates are] high profile, law enforcement, whatever the case may be, we aim to treat them like anybody else," said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
EXPLORE
July 18, 2011
The Harford County Chamber of Commerce recently elected its officers for 2011-12. Steven L. Wiseman, a certified public accountant and vice president of Wiseman Associates, is chairman; Robin Sommer, owner of Images of Sommer, is chair-elect; Brenda Morrison, vice president for marketing, development and community relations at Harford Community College is vice chair of administration; and Paul Balsamo, a certified public accountant and president of...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Four Baltimore police officers have been suspended as part of an investigation stemming from the conviction of an officer for conspiring with a drug informant to orchestrate arrests, according to sources with knowledge of the case. Anthony Guglielmi, the agency's chief spokesman, confirmed that the four officers were suspended from the Northwest District, where Richburg had worked in a special plainclothes unit. He declined to identify the officers or say why they were suspended.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
To compensate for the arrest or suspension of more than two dozen officers in an alleged towing company scam, Baltimore Police will pull uniformed officers away from an initiative that contributed to a profound reduction in violent crime in the Southeastern District. A team of mostly rookies hired with stimulus funds last year, which had been used for foot patrols in areas including downtown and a high-crime corridor in the Southeast, will be reassigned to squad cars in the Northeast, where a large number of the implicated city police officers worked.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | August 13, 2013
County Executive Ken Ulman recognized two Maryland Transportation Authority police officers last week for bravery during a stop along I-95 in Howard County that got caught up in a chain-reaction accident. On Nov. 21, 2012, around 10:21 p.m., Cpl. Timothy Morandi and Officer Jonathan Slusar were on duty on I-95 South near the exit for Route 100 when they pulled over a car they suspected was stolen. As the officers questioned the suspect outside the vehicle, an impaired driver ran into their patrol cars.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Few of the officers assigned to Baltimore County's Woodlawn Precinct ever met Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero, but they all know his story. Every day, they pass pictures of the officer and his family as they walk through the station's halls. One image shows his daughter, Holly, wearing his cap and seated at his desk the day his wife came to clean it out for the last time. Prothero died 13 years ago, shot three times responding to a jewelry store robbery while working a second job as a security guard.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
A Baltimore police officer who authorities say shot a man who attacked him in Middle River last month has been cleared of wrongdoing, Baltimore County police said Thursday. The officer was justified in his actions during the Sept. 20 incident on Red Rose Farm Road, State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger's office said. The officer was identified as Officer Michael Nolan-Anderson by the city police department and by Shellenberger's office. County police say Nolan-Anderson had gotten off work and was driving about 12:30 a.m. when one of two intoxicated men "somehow damaged the mirror on his vehicle.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A two-alarm fire in Baltimore City on Wednesday morning has sent a police officer to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center due to possible smoke inhalation, city fire department officials said. Capt. Roman Clark said that the blaze occurred at an apartment-style building with six units that were all vacant due to renovations. Officials said that the incident occurred at the 3400 block of Woodbrook Avenue near Mondawmin Mall. Clark added that a firefighter suffered minor injuries during the incident and was transported to a local hospital.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Complaints of excessive use of force and other misconduct by police are nearly as old as modern police departments themselves; the first known use of the term "police brutality" appeared in The New York Times in 1893, and it's been a problem for law-enforcement officials ever since. If police brutality isn't new, neither was much in the plan to combat it unveiled this week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. Most of the steps it outlined, such as beefing up the department's internal affairs unit, giving the chief greater power to discipline officers and studying the idea of equipping police with body cameras that record their interactions with the public were little more than hasty rehashes of the strategic plan Mr. Batts commissioned in 2012 when he took over the department.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
The decision last week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts to call in federal investigators to probe allegations of excessive use of force and other misconduct by Baltimore police is as embarrassing as it was unavoidable. No city attempting to polish its image as an attractive place to live and work wants to admit having a problem with police brutality it can't handle. But since a six-month investigation by The Sun uncovered evidence of a dysfunctional department seemingly inimical to reform, it's been apparent that the city needs help.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While hospitalized with a fractured ankle and broken jaw, John Bonkowski reached for his smartphone to find details about the man who beat him outside a parking garage near the Inner Harbor. He typed "Officer Michael McSpadden" into Google. The results stunned Bonkowski. He found references showing that the longtime Baltimore officer had been accused in three separate civil lawsuits: of kicking and stomping a woman, of breaking a man's wrist and of beating a man unconscious with a police baton.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Columbia-based real estate developer wants to build four glassy office buildings on its waterfront property in Canton, a project that could create a kind of Harbor farther East. Corporate Office Properties Trust's proposal calls for shopping, restaurants and four buildings with about 250,000 square feet of offices on top of several stories of parking, said Stephen Budorick, the real estate investment trust's executive vice president and chief operating officer. The company has no time frame for when the project could begin because it is seeking tenants before committing to construction, Budorick said.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors-Carroll/Howard installed officers for the 2011-2012 year at the Oct. 13 general membership meeting held at the Best Western Westminster Conference Center. Steve Aquino, President of NAIFA-MD installed the officers. Pictured from left, in the front row, is Roger Diehl , Past President, IFAPAC and National Committee Chair; Harvey Tegeler , President and Professional Development Chair; and Karen Palmer , Secretary and Public Relations Chair; and in the back row, Mark Darrell , Board of Director and Sponsorship/Program Chair; Brenda Myers , Board of Director and Community Service Chair; Gillian Lotz , President-Elect and Board of Director; Jim Kelly , Board of Director; Robert Zimmer , Treasurer; and Steve Aquino , Board of Director and Membership Chair.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2011
The first of 17 Baltimore police officers charged with extortion in what prosecutors describe as a scheme involving kickbacks to send drivers to a towing company not licensed by the city pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday. Officer David Reeping, 41, of Arbutus, could receive up to 20 years in prison for directing unsuspecting motorists to use Majestic Towing in Rosedale to tow vehicles from accident scenes and make repairs, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mary M. "Margie" Adams, who worked for a mortgage origination company and was a physical fitness enthusiast, died Friday at her Sparks home of a massive heart attack. She was 49. The daughter of Dr. Hector F. DiNardo Jr., a dentist, and Margaret Meekins DiNardo, a homemaker, Mary Margaret DiNardo was born in Baltimore and raised in Timonium. She was a 1983 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School and attended Marymount University and what is now McDaniel College. From 1987 to 1989, she was a medical scheduler at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, and from 1989 to 1993 was a claims adjuster in the Owings Mills office of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland.
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