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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Calvert Center, a 17-story office building between Mercy Medical Center and Battle Monument Park, is set to go to auction in October, the auctioneer announced. The roughly 412,000-square-foot high-rise, which formerly housed Bank of America's local operations center, is to be sold at auction on Oct. 11. Bids must be at least $14 per square foot, according to CBRE Auction Services. Seven percent of the building, located at 225 N. Calvert St., is currently occupied, auction materials say. Several major downtown office buildings have been put up for sale recently.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
An invitation to Baltimore strip club Scores' annual end-of-summer luau that included "a little part of the beach" inside caused a scare when it landed on a desk at Constellation Energy Group on Tuesday morning. The party's promoters bought some sand from a craft store and added it to the invitations, sent to businesses and others who sign up for Scores' mailing list. But when someone found the substance in two of the unmarked envelopes at Constellation, they dialed 911. Police and firefighters responded to the 18th floor of the 750 E. Pratt Street office tower shortly after 9 a.m., clearing the immediate area where the mail was opened, fire spokesman Ian Brennan said.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2000
Baltimore County firefighters evacuated 700 employees yesterday morning from the Investment Building in Towson after discovering smoke in the top floor of the 13-story office tower. County administrators allowed the workers to leave for the day as fire officials tried to determine the cause of the smoke. The building is located north of Towson Town Center. The county pays nearly $900,000 a year to lease space in the building, where state and county employees work, mainly in the county health and social services departments.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Developer J. Joseph Clarke has come up with a half-dozen ideas over the past 20 years - a hotel, corporate headquarters, residences, office space - for a prominent downtown site three blocks from the Inner Harbor. But none took hold. He hopes this time will be different. So do city leaders whose patience is wearing thin with Clarke and the owner of the site, a parking lot at the corner of Light and East Redwood streets "I wish it weren't the case that it's gone on this long," said Clarke, president of J.J. Clarke Enterprises Inc. "We think that this is the best proposal that we can make for this site at this time.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
First Fidelity Bancorp, on the heels of a decision to eliminate roughly half the work force of the Bank of Baltimore, is considering vacating the downtown headquarters of the recently acquired bank.But the New Jersey-based bank holding company's potential move from the 25-story office tower at 120 W. Baltimore St. -- until recently known as the Bank of Baltimore Building -- is contingent on finding a tenant to replace the bank, officials said.Earlier this week, First Fidelity sent out proposal requests to six area commercial real estate brokerage firms, the first step in its efforts to sublease the three top floors of the office tower.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
The Samuel Owings House -- one of Baltimore County's oldest -- will be dismantled, moved and rebuilt to make way for a nine-story office tower, under a deal designed to end months of wrangling over the historic property.The project's developer and County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III "shook hands on it," Michael Davis, a county spokesman, said yesterday.The two-story, brick Georgian country home was built in 1767 by the mill owner for whom Owings Mills is named. One of about 20 remaining 18th-century homes in Baltimore County, it is owned by Painters Mill Associates (No. 1)
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | March 6, 1991
Despite recent layoffs that have reduced its Baltimore staff from 375 to about 300 and its worldwide staff from 700 to 600, Baltimore's largest architecture firm is still committed to move its headquarters from 400 E. Pratt St. to the Commerce Place office tower under construction at South and Baltimore streets.Harold Adams, chairman of RTKL Associates, said the firm is contractually obligated to move into the 30-story building, where it has leased about 100,000 square feet of space. If RTKL does not need all that space as a result of staff reductions, it could end up subleasing some of it to other tenants, Mr. Adams said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
The Blaustein family's real estate arm has begun actively working to sell its namesake office tower downtown for the first time in its 31-year history, according to a package sent to potential investors this week.The 25-story Blaustein Building is especially noteworthy because was one of the key elements that sparked Baltimore's downtown renaissance in the early 1960s.American Trading Real Estate Properties Inc., the Blaustein-controlled real estate firm, is seeking $13.5 million for the 1 N. Charles St. tower, according to the confidential offering package, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun.The 287,000-square-foot tower is the headquarters for Blaustein affiliates Crown Central Petroleum Corp.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
The National Security Agency has rented a 12-story office building that towers over its sprawling complex at Fort Meade and has remained nearly empty for more than two years, real estate industry and county sources say.The KMS Group Inc. announced yesterday that the building, which came to symbolize the area's depressed commercial leasing market, had been rented to a "major Department of Defense activity" but would not elaborate.The office tower, prominently located in the National Business Park near Route 32 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, is the largest office building in the county.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
State occupational health officials conducted an unannounced inspection yesterday at a Towson office tower where employees repeatedly have complained of breathing difficulties. Workers with Maryland Occupational Safety and Health arrived about 11:30 a.m. at the Investment Building in Towson, a 13-story office tower that has been the source of frequent and persistent health complaints by state and county workers. They spent about three hours inside, talking to employees, taking air samples and viewing mold damage.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Calvert Center, a 17-story office building between Mercy Medical Center and Battle Monument Park, is set to go to auction in October, the auctioneer announced. The roughly 412,000-square-foot high-rise, which formerly housed Bank of America's local operations center, is to be sold at auction on Oct. 11. Bids must be at least $14 per square foot, according to CBRE Auction Services. Seven percent of the building, located at 225 N. Calvert St., is currently occupied, auction materials say. Several major downtown office buildings have been put up for sale recently.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Construction crews are busy filling a 12-story gap that has stood empty in the center of Towson for nearly 10 years. Workers have been transforming the former Investment Building into the Towson City Center, a $27 million project of offices and retail space near the downtown traffic circle that is expected to be completed by June. It's a new life for a structure that some once believed to be a "sick building," abandoned in early 2002 amid health complaints by state and county employees who worked there.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The Downtown Partnership plans to unveil an ambitious proposal Friday to create more than $100 million worth of new parks and public plazas throughout the central business district, including major projects for the Inner Harbor, Charles Center and west side. The proposal would transform the downtown landscape, with a green oasis where the 1st Mariner Arena stands and possibly the demolition of the Lexington Market Arcade to reopen the street as a public thoroughfare. The proposed work could also involve the realignment of city streets to make way for plazas and streetscape improvements.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 20, 2008
A long-abandoned office building that towers over the roundabout in downtown Towson - and which state and Baltimore County employees vacated seven years ago after complaining it was toxic - may get a new lease on life. If it goes ahead, a developer's plan to renovate the white-clad, 13-story Investment Building would be a crucial step in the redevelopment of Towson, where $700 million worth of retail, commercial and residential projects is planned over the next few years, officials said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Venable LLP will leave its Charles Center offices of nearly four decades for a new home at the eastern end of the Inner Harbor, continuing a shift from downtown's traditional financial district to newer buildings along the city's waterfront. The 450-person law firm will move in the spring to 750 E. Pratt St., where it will occupy nearly half the 18-story tower. The 150,000 square feet it will occupy has been vacant since the building opened in 2002. Venable, which is expanding, has been seeking larger and more modern quarters for about a year, Mike Baader, partner-in-charge of Venable's Baltimore office, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | April 28, 2007
A landmark Baltimore office tower built by the founder of Amoco Oil was purchased yesterday by a Wilmington, Del.-based commercial developer. The Buccini/Pollin Group said yesterday that it acquired One North Charles Street, built in 1963 by oil magnate Jacob Blaustein, for an undisclosed amount. Buccini/Pollin will be spending more than $30 million, including the acquisition cost and nearly $10 million in renovations to the 25-story tower and outside plaza, said Christopher F. Buccini, a founding partner.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | November 14, 1990
Five months after a City Council bill was introduced that would allow a local developer to acquire and use two lanes of Redwood Street to build a 34-story office tower downtown, Baltimore's Planning Commission is holding a public hearing this week to consider the pros and cons of the project.The hearing will be part of the planning commission meeting that begins at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow in the eighth-floor meeting room of the municipal office building at 417 E. Fayette St.It is part of the review process that a development group headed by Leonard Attman must go through if it wants to secure city permission to acquire two lanes of Redwood Street between Charles and Light streets.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2005
A high-profile office tower at Baltimore's Inner Harbor is under contract for $207.5 million - which would be the highest price tag ever for a Baltimore office property. Georgia-based Wells Real Estate Investment Trust II Inc. has signed an agreement to buy the 28-story building at 100 E. Pratt St., considered one of downtown's most desirable properties, according to documents it filed last month with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The sale is scheduled to close May 10. Wells paid a nonrefundable $6 million deposit, to be applied to the purchase price.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2007
One of Baltimore's prime office towers is being purchased by a Canadian real estate investment trust for $73.5 million, according to a spokesman for the company. IPC US REIT has a contract to buy 500 E. Pratt St., the 12-story office building on a premier site across from the Inner Harbor, and is expected to complete the deal in April, said Ming Zhu, an analyst for the REIT. It is the REIT's first purchase in Baltimore. "We're always looking for good-quality buildings in downtown markets or suburban markets," Zhu said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,sun reporter | October 26, 2006
One of downtown Baltimore's trophy office buildings, 500 E. Pratt St., is on the market and generating strong interest from potential buyers, an owner's representative said yesterday. The owner of the 12-story tower, one of the newest at the Inner Harbor, will be considering offers over the next couple of weeks and expects to select a buyer before Thanksgiving, said Bruce Strasburg, a principal and senior vice president with Trammell Crow Co.'s Washington office. Trammell Crow is representing the building's owner, Multi-Employer Property Trust, a pool of public and private pension funds.
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