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By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
Can saving Mother Earth also mean saving money?Corporate Express, a Jessup-based stationery and office supplies company catering to the corporate market, thinks so.The company, which carries a line of office products made from recycled materials and promotes environmental responsibility, shows customers how to reduce waste and save money by letting office stockroom shelves go bare."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Elvira Elizabeth "Bette" Kennedy, a World War II veteran who with her husband co-founded Dawn's Office Supply, died Friday of a heart attack at Emeritus of Towson on North Charles Street. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 89. The daughter of a barnstormer and truck driver and an educator, Elvira Elizabeth Lance was born and raised in Oneonta, N.Y., where she graduated in 1942 from Oneonta High School. She enlisted in the Navy in 1943, and was working as a pharmacist's mate at a naval hospital in Northern California when she met her future husband, Thomas J. Kennedy Jr., a Marine who was recuperating after losing his sight when he was blinded by a Japanese booby trap at Bougainville in the Solomon Islands.
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BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 2, 1992
Faced with intense pressure from office supply discount superstores and the worsening recession, the Miller family, owners of the Quill Corp., challenged its employees to launch a dramatic cost-reduction program.In good times, it's easy to exceed budgets and encourage spending to grow your business. But in these tough times, cutting both fixed and variable costs may be the only way to keep your doors open.Until 1990, Quill, based in Lincolnshire, Ill., grew quickly, selling office supplies to thousands of businesses across the country, through mail and telephone orders.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
It's the height of summer, but inside many Baltimore-area stores, fall has arrived. While shoppers sorted through racks of discounted shorts and tank tops, retailers at White Marsh Mall began displaying school backpacks and uniforms. Area Target stores offered plenty of summer picnic gear but devoted extensive display space to notebooks, pencils, folders and glue. And while some consumers said they can't think about school purchases until after family vacations, office supply stores such as Staples began promoting back-to-school computers, laptops and iPads.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
In just about every way, An Die Musik and Jacobs Gardner Supply Co. are opposites.An Die Musik sells entertainment: music for the soul.Jacobs Gardner Supply Co. sells the essentials of work life: pens, copy paper and desks.But the two Maryland businesses, one a music store recently opened on North Charles Street and the other a large office supply business based in Bowie, have much in common.They confronted a common enemy -- the American superstore -- and have undergone significant transformations to stay in business.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
A Baltimore County judge has ruled that an advocacy group for the blind is not entitled to preferential treatment when the state buys up to $5 million in office supplies. Circuit Judge John F. Fader II said in an opinion released yesterday that the procurement law giving Blind Industries and Services of Maryland preference in state contracts does not apply to the office supply pact that it sought last summer. The law says that the state should buy supplies and services from the agency whenever possible.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2002
When Staples superstores arrived in Howard County, it signaled tough times for Gary Porter's National Business Products Inc., a small business-supply store. But now Porter uses the competition to drive customers to him. The 13-year-old company developed a niche in scratched and dented office furniture that has helped it grow at a time when sales have declined or stagnated at other office supply stores, including Staples. Five years ago, furniture accounted for about 5 percent of his business, and office supplies the rest, Porter said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan blocked Staples Inc.'s acquisition of rival Office Depot Inc. Monday, he said that, to a large degree, the office-supply superstore chains had been "hoisted with their own petards."The veteran judge was talking about his conclusion that the companies were so successful creating their own market niche that they didn't face enough competition from other retail stores to discourage the merged company from raising prices.A day after Hogan's decision effectively killed the acquisition, however, antitrust experts say Staples and Office Depot were similarly undermined by internal corporate documents that fatally undercut their bid to fend off an antitrust lawsuit by the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Office Products Co. said yesterday that it will buy Mail Boxes Etc. for $24.50 a share in stock, or $276.9 million, to expand into retail services aimed at small businesses.The supplier of paper, services and coffee to companies and schools said it will exchange one share of its stock for each of Mail Boxes Etc.'s 11.3 million shares outstanding.The buyer also will convert 1.3 million Mail Boxes Etc.'s employee stock options to its own stock options, it said.U.S. Office Products has expanded quickly by acquiring more than 165 companies in contract stationery, corporate travel and computer network services.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | September 17, 1990
All Joan LeFaivre's praying is paying off.Since Ms. LeFaivre became president of Dawn's Office Supply Co. in the beginning of July, the Charles Village business has had the best two months of sales in the company's 43-year history.That's in a sluggish economy and during two of the traditionally worst months of the year for the office supply company, which thrives on the school and business trade for its products."I really do pray about this business," said Ms. LeFaivre, her gold cross swinging gently on a chain around her neck.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
Thomas J. Kennedy Jr., who while fighting with the Marines in the South Pacific during World War II was blinded by enemy fire and after his return to Baltimore established Dawn's Office Supply, died Friday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 86. Mr. Kennedy was born and raised on his family's Kingsville farm. Growing up, he developed a lifelong love of horses while helping his father on his horse-drawn milk wagon. In his youth, he worked as a Western Union messenger boy, exercised racehorses on a Monkton farm and was a Pep Boys stock clerk.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Frank Parsons Inc., an office-supply company that moved to Hanover two years ago with plans of expansion, said Friday that it is seeking Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Its filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Maryland reported debts in the range of $10 million to $50 million, including more than $6 million in claims it is disputing. The firm, which calls itself the largest employee-owned company in the country focusing on office supplies, business products and technology equipment, estimated the value of its assets in the same $10 million to $50 million range.
NEWS
August 9, 2007
The Baltimore branch of the U.S. Postal Service is collecting back-to-school supplies and clothing for students ages 5 through 17 who live in city shelters. Customers can donate items at any area post office in a 212 ZIP code area. Containers will be set up to collect donations. The Postal Service said it is partnering with the Preston Mitchum Jr. Foundation, which will distribute the items to area shelters. The foundation is named after a news photographer in Baltimore who, according to the institute's Web site, promotes the use of documentaries to highlight tragedies.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
A skeptical glance from a potential customer is enough to remind Beverly Williams-Trimble about the tough side of running her office supply business. "Sometimes, they see an African-American woman and a small business and think we can't handle the job, but we've been doing this for years," said Williams-Trimble, owner of Sue-Ann's Office Supply Inc. in Northwest Baltimore. Williams-Trimble has learned the art of persistence and over time has changed enough people's minds to attract more than $1 million in annual revenue.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
Howard G. Bishop, who owned an office supply business, died Sunday of a heart ailment at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 98. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he attended Polytechnic Institute before going to work downtown in 1920 -- at age 16 -- as an errand boy for the old H.M. Biden Co. on West Fayette Street. He became a bookkeeper and later sold stationery and office supplies, and took orders for engraved papers the firm produced. In 1932, when the owner died, Mr. Bishop started running the business and later purchased it. The company became Leimkuhler-Biden and moved to Ridgely Street.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2002
When Staples superstores arrived in Howard County, it signaled tough times for Gary Porter's National Business Products Inc., a small business-supply store. But now Porter uses the competition to drive customers to him. The 13-year-old company developed a niche in scratched and dented office furniture that has helped it grow at a time when sales have declined or stagnated at other office supply stores, including Staples. Five years ago, furniture accounted for about 5 percent of his business, and office supplies the rest, Porter said.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 3, 1991
As the news whipped among the gathering of office products retailers, fingers stopped worrying plastic foam cups filled with soda pop, and eyes looked up from note- and scribble-filled pads:The Office Stop chain of "superstores" had filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy two days before, meaning that its three Baltimore-area stores would be liquidated."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
The FBI has officially ended its lengthy look into alleged moonlighting violations by Baltimore and Baltimore County police, officials said yesterday. The decision ends a three-year investigation into about 40 city and several county police officers who worked as security guards at area office-supply stores. It also comes after the state's top federal prosecutor, Thomas M. DiBiagio, declined to press charges. And it puts to rest inquiries sought by FBI agents in Baltimore, who disagreed with DiBiagio's decision and asked federal prosecutors in Massachusetts to review part of the investigation in recent months.
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