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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Even as Baltimore principals have been given an unprecedented amount of responsibility over the past four years under schools CEO Andrés Alonso, their average salary has remained among the lowest in the state. The average salary for city principals this school year is about $108,000, just $2,800 more than their pay in 2008, according to an analysis of school system employee salaries obtained through a Maryland Public Information Act request by The Baltimore Sun. That leaves city principals — who lead schools with the largest and most academically challenged populations in the state — behind most of their colleagues in the metropolitan area and only slightly above rural counties on the Eastern Shore.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
About 3,000 paraeducators and other professional staff represented by the Baltimore Teachers Union will receive pay raises and more vacation time under a tentative deal struck by the union and city school system. The union announced Monday that the Paraprofessionals and School Related Personnel chapter of the BTU — which includes classroom assistants, teacher's aides, accountants, secretaries and office staff — will receive raises retroactive to July 1, 2010, and more holidays off. Members who do not work in a school will also be able to take a spring break.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
The county state's attorney's office has entered cyberspace, introducing a home page on the World Wide Web.Anyone with Internet access can download information on dealing with bad checks, domestic violence, victim rights and the victim witness assistance unit, said Marcie S. Wogan, deputy state's attorney."
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 12, 2000
A FINANCIAL planner once said that the best client would be Rip Van Winkle, someone who slept for 20 years and let the planner build the portfolio. A comatose client isn't everyone's ideal, however. Some financial advisers say their favorite clients are knowledgeable, trusting and open to ideas. "They know how to take gains and how to take losses," said Joan Jones of A. G. Edwards & Sons in Baltimore. "They know how to say thank you. That's not what a lot of people do." But just as there are good clients, there are bad ones.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 21, 2012
A Baltimore grand jury indicted a 29-year-old woman Monday on attempted murder and seven other charges in connection with the brutal stabbing of her 8-month-old daughter during a supervised visit at a city social services office in April. Kenisha Thomas, who is being held without bail in the incident, was scheduled for a preliminary hearing in district court Tuesday, but the indictment will move the felony case into circuit court. An arraignment on the new charges is set for July 17. According to police, Thomas smuggled a large kitchen knife into a Baltimore social services office April 24 and repeatedly stabbed the infant, named Pretty Diamond, in the head and neck as office staff fought back, with one man throwing a chair at her. The baby, who previously was removed from Thomas' care, survived.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 21, 2006
A former Baltimore construction company manager admitted in federal court yesterday that she violated the conditions of her immunity agreement and withheld information about falsifying corporate documents from authorities who were investigating her boss and former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell. Jeanie Ashfield-Testa, 63, of Ashburn, Va., pleaded guilty to concealing knowledge of mail fraud from federal law enforcement officials and renewed her promise of full cooperation in the coming joint trial of Bromwell and W. David Stoffregen, former president of contractor Poole and Kent.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
A fire that broke out Sunday morning in a kitchen at Patuxent Institute, a state mental health facility in Jessup, caused $5,000 in damage, state fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire that apparently began in an exhaust duct of an oven, said John Wagner of the state fire marshal's office. Kitchen staff members reported the fire at 8:35 a.m., fire officials said. About 60 firefighters from nearby departments, including Long Reach, Elkridge and Savage, responded. The preliminary cause of the fire has been ruled an accident, fire officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
IT'S HARD TO BE optimistic about President Clinton's efforts to reduce the hard-core drug addictions that have turned some of America's poor communities into reincarnations of the Wild West. Shoot-outs are common and people take it for granted that even the law is susceptible to the financial temptations of so profitable an industry. Less noticeable is what drugs are also doing in more affluent neighborhoods, sapping the goodness out of young lives, marriages and careers.There was much optimism three years ago when Mr. Clinton appointed a veteran law enforcement officer, Lee P. Brown, who had headed the Atlanta, Houston and New York police departments to be the nation's drug policy director.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2001
Dr. Byron Wallace Inman, an oral surgeon who made a family business of dentistry, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Homewood at Crumland Farms retirement community in Frederick. He was 87. A native of Mount Airy, N.C., Dr. Inman moved to Baltimore after high school to study dentistry at the urging of his uncle, also a dentist. After graduating from the University of Maryland dental school in the late 1930s, he attended to the teeth of Baltimoreans as part of a practice of three, with his uncle and his cousin.
NEWS
By Rick Horowitz | January 25, 1996
OPTION NO. 1: The Creepy. She goes to the grand jury and swears she had nothing to do with it. Law-firm billing records eluding searchers for years? Records suddenly turning up in the White House living quarters?''I'm just as surprised as you are,'' she tells them. ''It must have been some sinister force.''Can she do The Creepy? She can do The Creepy, but it's risky. She's not the only one being subpoenaed. Somebody else might know something. Somebody else might know that she knows something.
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