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By Dallas Morning News | April 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A cryptic fax referring to the Oklahoma City bombing was sent to Rep. Steve Stockman by the former Republican chairwoman from Orange County, Texas, a Texas GOP official said yesterday.Kent Adams, chairman of the Jefferson County Republican Party, told reporters in Beaumont, Texas, that a woman identifying herself as the former chairwoman, Libby Molley, called the congressman Sunday night and said she had sent him the fax.Mr. Adams said that Ms. Molley "reportedly has been affiliated with the Michigan Militia," a group in Michigan that has drawn the attention of federal authorities since the Oklahoma bombing.
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NEWS
December 21, 2004
A fire that broke out Sunday morning in a kitchen at Patuxent Institute, a state mental health facility in Jessup, caused $5,000 in damage, state fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire that apparently began in an exhaust duct of an oven, said John Wagner of the state fire marshal's office. Kitchen staff members reported the fire at 8:35 a.m., fire officials said. About 60 firefighters from nearby departments, including Long Reach, Elkridge and Savage, responded. The preliminary cause of the fire has been ruled an accident, fire officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
IT'S HARD TO BE optimistic about President Clinton's efforts to reduce the hard-core drug addictions that have turned some of America's poor communities into reincarnations of the Wild West. Shoot-outs are common and people take it for granted that even the law is susceptible to the financial temptations of so profitable an industry. Less noticeable is what drugs are also doing in more affluent neighborhoods, sapping the goodness out of young lives, marriages and careers.There was much optimism three years ago when Mr. Clinton appointed a veteran law enforcement officer, Lee P. Brown, who had headed the Atlanta, Houston and New York police departments to be the nation's drug policy director.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2001
Dr. Byron Wallace Inman, an oral surgeon who made a family business of dentistry, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Homewood at Crumland Farms retirement community in Frederick. He was 87. A native of Mount Airy, N.C., Dr. Inman moved to Baltimore after high school to study dentistry at the urging of his uncle, also a dentist. After graduating from the University of Maryland dental school in the late 1930s, he attended to the teeth of Baltimoreans as part of a practice of three, with his uncle and his cousin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and members of the Baltimore Ravens organization gathered this morning in front of City Hall as they launched an effort to build team spirit one purple stencil at a time. Days away from a playoff match against the Kansas City Chiefs, the "paint the town purple" campaign will result in a slew of stenciled images placed in the city, and throughout Baltimore and Howard counties. Tuesday morning, the Ravens' grounds crew painted the grounds in front of City Hall and Federal Hill with the same Ravens logo seen on the field at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
After a steep decline in 2008, the cost of overtime pay for city school employees is rising again, and that's cause for serious concern. But school officials are going to have an even harder time coping with the problem if they also have to fight the perception that city schools CEO Andrés Alonso is part of it. Last year, the police sergeant whose duties include providing security for Mr. Alonso as well as driving him to appointments around town...
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Sandra A. O'Connor, who in her three decades as Baltimore County's top prosecutor gained both support and criticism for her unflinching pursuit of death sentences for killers, said yesterday that she will step down when her term ends next year. A political force who hasn't faced an Election Day challenge since the early 1980s, O'Connor said yesterday that she would like to be known for such innovations as the establishment of the state's first victim-witness unit. But even as she discussed her reasons for retirement and plans for the future, she addressed criticism of her policy on capital punishment - against the backdrop of a Maryland death row that is disproportionately populated by inmates convicted of crimes in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Rick Horowitz | January 25, 1996
OPTION NO. 1: The Creepy. She goes to the grand jury and swears she had nothing to do with it. Law-firm billing records eluding searchers for years? Records suddenly turning up in the White House living quarters?''I'm just as surprised as you are,'' she tells them. ''It must have been some sinister force.''Can she do The Creepy? She can do The Creepy, but it's risky. She's not the only one being subpoenaed. Somebody else might know something. Somebody else might know that she knows something.
NEWS
January 15, 2000
THE LAST-PLACE Washington Wizards look so awful, it seems only a messiah can save them. Lo and behold! Could that savior be on the way? Don't get too excited yet. The franchise that was once Baltimore's may or may not sign Michael Jordan as part-owner and key decision-maker. But speculation that His Airness might come to the Baltimore-Washington area is stirring plenty of optimism in local sports circles. For good reason. Mr. Jordan doesn't have to hover over mere humans or hit clutch jumpers anymore to make a difference.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 26, 2012
Update 9:48 p.m.: With the Jets picking North Carolina defensive end Quinton Coples, it creates more of an opportunity for the Ravens to land either Alabama linebackers Courtney Upshaw or Dont'a Hightower. The Ravens also like South Carolina defensive end Melvin Ingram, who had 10 sacks in 2011. Ingram could also play outside linebacker.    Update 9:28 p.m.: Like most teams and fans around the NFL, the Ravens couldn't predict the amount of trades in the top 10 picks, but they at least have been able to match up the teams with the players they chose.
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