Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOffice Staff
IN THE NEWS

Office Staff

NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
About 3,000 paraeducators and other professional staff represented by the Baltimore Teachers Union will receive pay raises and more vacation time under a tentative deal struck by the union and city school system. The union announced Monday that the Paraprofessionals and School Related Personnel chapter of the BTU — which includes classroom assistants, teacher's aides, accountants, secretaries and office staff — will receive raises retroactive to July 1, 2010, and more holidays off. Members who do not work in a school will also be able to take a spring break.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Even as Baltimore principals have been given an unprecedented amount of responsibility over the past four years under schools CEO Andrés Alonso, their average salary has remained among the lowest in the state. The average salary for city principals this school year is about $108,000, just $2,800 more than their pay in 2008, according to an analysis of school system employee salaries obtained through a Maryland Public Information Act request by The Baltimore Sun. That leaves city principals — who lead schools with the largest and most academically challenged populations in the state — behind most of their colleagues in the metropolitan area and only slightly above rural counties on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Baltimore principals will be required to take extra steps before suspending 4- and 5-year-olds under a new policy that seeks to curb the practice of kicking the youngest students out of school. Beginning next school year, principals will have to consult with the central office before they suspend pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students for any length of time — a move that comes after The Baltimore Sun revealed a sharp uptick in pre-K suspensions in Baltimore, which had the most of any district in the state.
FEATURES
April 18, 2013
An email that Gawker reports was sent through the University of Maryland Delta Gamma sorority list-serv is lighting up the interwebs, it seems. The gist of it appears to be fury that sorority sisters were "weird" and "awkward" to Sigma Nu brothers during Greek Week. News of the email has been spread around sites including Huffington Post , the Atlantic Wire , the Washington City Paper and Cosmopolitan magazine. The national sorority has responded on its Facebook page , saying, " Delta Gamma Executive Offices is aware of the email allegedly written by a member of our Beta Sigma chapter that has gone viral after being posted on gawker.com and deadspin.com.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
A fire that broke out Sunday morning in a kitchen at Patuxent Institute, a state mental health facility in Jessup, caused $5,000 in damage, state fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire that apparently began in an exhaust duct of an oven, said John Wagner of the state fire marshal's office. Kitchen staff members reported the fire at 8:35 a.m., fire officials said. About 60 firefighters from nearby departments, including Long Reach, Elkridge and Savage, responded. The preliminary cause of the fire has been ruled an accident, fire officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
IT'S HARD TO BE optimistic about President Clinton's efforts to reduce the hard-core drug addictions that have turned some of America's poor communities into reincarnations of the Wild West. Shoot-outs are common and people take it for granted that even the law is susceptible to the financial temptations of so profitable an industry. Less noticeable is what drugs are also doing in more affluent neighborhoods, sapping the goodness out of young lives, marriages and careers.There was much optimism three years ago when Mr. Clinton appointed a veteran law enforcement officer, Lee P. Brown, who had headed the Atlanta, Houston and New York police departments to be the nation's drug policy director.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2001
Dr. Byron Wallace Inman, an oral surgeon who made a family business of dentistry, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Homewood at Crumland Farms retirement community in Frederick. He was 87. A native of Mount Airy, N.C., Dr. Inman moved to Baltimore after high school to study dentistry at the urging of his uncle, also a dentist. After graduating from the University of Maryland dental school in the late 1930s, he attended to the teeth of Baltimoreans as part of a practice of three, with his uncle and his cousin.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 15, 2010
When it was announced that the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School would move into the Legg Mason tower in Baltimore's Harbor East this summer, school officials touted the benefits of the move: waterfront view, hip neighborhood, new building loaded with technology and a chance for students to interact with Legg's executives. But in light of recent events, it might not be wise to expose the business leaders of tomorrow to the people running Legg Mason today. Instead, it might be better if Legg executives took the elevator to some classes this fall, after the Carey school joins them in the taxpayer-subsidized tower.
NEWS
By Rick Horowitz | January 25, 1996
OPTION NO. 1: The Creepy. She goes to the grand jury and swears she had nothing to do with it. Law-firm billing records eluding searchers for years? Records suddenly turning up in the White House living quarters?''I'm just as surprised as you are,'' she tells them. ''It must have been some sinister force.''Can she do The Creepy? She can do The Creepy, but it's risky. She's not the only one being subpoenaed. Somebody else might know something. Somebody else might know that she knows something.
NEWS
January 15, 2000
THE LAST-PLACE Washington Wizards look so awful, it seems only a messiah can save them. Lo and behold! Could that savior be on the way? Don't get too excited yet. The franchise that was once Baltimore's may or may not sign Michael Jordan as part-owner and key decision-maker. But speculation that His Airness might come to the Baltimore-Washington area is stirring plenty of optimism in local sports circles. For good reason. Mr. Jordan doesn't have to hover over mere humans or hit clutch jumpers anymore to make a difference.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.