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April 18, 2013
An email that Gawker reports was sent through the University of Maryland Delta Gamma sorority list-serv is lighting up the interwebs, it seems. The gist of it appears to be fury that sorority sisters were "weird" and "awkward" to Sigma Nu brothers during Greek Week. News of the email has been spread around sites including Huffington Post , the Atlantic Wire , the Washington City Paper and Cosmopolitan magazine. The national sorority has responded on its Facebook page , saying, " Delta Gamma Executive Offices is aware of the email allegedly written by a member of our Beta Sigma chapter that has gone viral after being posted on gawker.com and deadspin.com.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
James Bennett hadn't seen a dentist in a decade. He had other priorities, like scoring heroin. Even if he'd been of a mind to do something about his rotting teeth, he wouldn't have known where to go or whom to call. Now, at long last, he sat in the blue exam chair in the Southwest Baltimore office of Dr. Larry Bank, a cramped space with a bucolic wallpaper scene of a waterfall. At 45, Bennett is trying to restart his life. That means getting a grip on his addiction through a residential rehab program - and fixing his ragged mess of a mouth.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
The Baltimore school system failed to follow its policies when hiring a temporary employee who allegedly misrepresented himself as a child therapist and is now charged with raping a teen. City school officials said Shawn Nowlin, a 27-year-old arrested Nov. 26 on charges that he impregnated a 15-year-old in Harford County, was hired in September 2011 to oversee "partnership coordination" and act as a community liaison at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School under the title "Temporary Professional II. " Nowlin was employed for a year under that title, but the rules say temporary workers' employment cannot exceed 90 days.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 21, 2012
A Baltimore grand jury indicted a 29-year-old woman Monday on attempted murder and seven other charges in connection with the brutal stabbing of her 8-month-old daughter during a supervised visit at a city social services office in April. Kenisha Thomas, who is being held without bail in the incident, was scheduled for a preliminary hearing in district court Tuesday, but the indictment will move the felony case into circuit court. An arraignment on the new charges is set for July 17. According to police, Thomas smuggled a large kitchen knife into a Baltimore social services office April 24 and repeatedly stabbed the infant, named Pretty Diamond, in the head and neck as office staff fought back, with one man throwing a chair at her. The baby, who previously was removed from Thomas' care, survived.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Hampstead has purchased two new electric route books for use by the town's water meter readers, said Town Manager John A. Riley.He said the hand-held units, called "palmcorders," automatically read the town's newer water meters.With older meters, he said, the meter reader must type the meter reading into the unit."The time saving is when you come back to the office," Mr. Riley said. The palmcorders download all the meter readings directly into the computer system, so office staff do not have to transcribe them.
NEWS
December 21, 2004
A fire that broke out Sunday morning in a kitchen at Patuxent Institute, a state mental health facility in Jessup, caused $5,000 in damage, state fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire that apparently began in an exhaust duct of an oven, said John Wagner of the state fire marshal's office. Kitchen staff members reported the fire at 8:35 a.m., fire officials said. About 60 firefighters from nearby departments, including Long Reach, Elkridge and Savage, responded. The preliminary cause of the fire has been ruled an accident, fire officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
IT'S HARD TO BE optimistic about President Clinton's efforts to reduce the hard-core drug addictions that have turned some of America's poor communities into reincarnations of the Wild West. Shoot-outs are common and people take it for granted that even the law is susceptible to the financial temptations of so profitable an industry. Less noticeable is what drugs are also doing in more affluent neighborhoods, sapping the goodness out of young lives, marriages and careers.There was much optimism three years ago when Mr. Clinton appointed a veteran law enforcement officer, Lee P. Brown, who had headed the Atlanta, Houston and New York police departments to be the nation's drug policy director.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2001
Dr. Byron Wallace Inman, an oral surgeon who made a family business of dentistry, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Homewood at Crumland Farms retirement community in Frederick. He was 87. A native of Mount Airy, N.C., Dr. Inman moved to Baltimore after high school to study dentistry at the urging of his uncle, also a dentist. After graduating from the University of Maryland dental school in the late 1930s, he attended to the teeth of Baltimoreans as part of a practice of three, with his uncle and his cousin.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Oden Bowie, the former secretary of the Maryland Senate and grandson of Maryland Gov. Oden Bowie, died Oct. 23 at the Arbor at Baywoods in Annapolis of complications from a fall he suffered at his home last month. He was 97. His daughter, Ambler Bowie Slabe, said he had spent his entire life at Fairview, the Bowie home in Prince George's County. She said he was the sixth generation of his family to reside there. "He was respected and admired by everyone," said Maryland Senate President Mike Miller.
NEWS
By Rick Horowitz | January 25, 1996
OPTION NO. 1: The Creepy. She goes to the grand jury and swears she had nothing to do with it. Law-firm billing records eluding searchers for years? Records suddenly turning up in the White House living quarters?''I'm just as surprised as you are,'' she tells them. ''It must have been some sinister force.''Can she do The Creepy? She can do The Creepy, but it's risky. She's not the only one being subpoenaed. Somebody else might know something. Somebody else might know that she knows something.
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