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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
The Baltimore development company that rehabilitated the dormant American Can Co. plant has turned its sights on renovating the abandoned Procter & Gamble Co. soap plant in Locust Point.Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse Inc.'s work on the Canton landmark resulted in significant retail space. It is studying converting the 26-acre waterfront site at 1422 Nicholson St. into primarily office space."In terms of the energy and the excitement level, we're thinking of it in terms of American Can, and in terms of the character we're hoping it will have -- but we're thinking at this point, and it's very early in the process -- that it will be just office space," said Bill Struever, the company's president.
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NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2000
About a year from now, workers will occupy lakefront offices in a six-story, steel-frame building of precast concrete and green glass where the Rusty Scupper restaurant once stood. "We bought it with the idea of making it an office building," said David Costello, president of Columbia-based Costello Construction Inc. and one of four developers on the project. The old Rusty Scupper building will be razed next month. The new building is expected to be complete by spring 2001. Its leasing agent anticipates that at least a quarter of the new, 75,000-square-foot building will be spoken for before construction is complete -- an occurrence he says that is not unusual for Columbia.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 9, 2007
A gleaming new structure that will house a jewelry store and office space has emerged on the site of a five-alarm fire 10 years ago that destroyed two buildings that represented more than a century of history on Annapolis' historic Main Street. The new building, which holds the addresses of 184/186 Main St. and 7 State Circle, has brought closure to the community, which witnessed long fighting over plans for the site and had been frustrated by the appearance of the vacant lot in the heart of Annapolis' prized historic district.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2001
The retail center at Dorsey Business Park stands out in its neighborhood. Surrounded by six large and towering office buildings, the flat, single-story retail center looks like a fish out of water. These days, it appears about as healthy as one. Although its largest tenant, Body Factory fitness center, which takes up nearly two-thirds of the center, seems as strong as its well-muscled members inside, three of the seven parcels in the retail center are vacant shells visible from the street.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 17, 2002
NEW YORK - The future of Ground Zero began taking shape yesterday as developers unveiled six possible ways to rebuild the devastated site, all of which feature a memorial park to the nearly 3,000 killed in the Sept. 11 attacks and a city skyline that will remain permanently altered by the absence of the World Trade Center towers. The plans vary in the amount of space allotted to a memorial park, but all replace - in shorter buildings - the entire 11 million square feet of office space lost in the towers' destruction.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
The day the lights went on last summer at 750 E. Pratt St., Baltimore's first new office tower in a decade, Constellation Energy Group Inc. moved in to three floors. Today, just a few other offices have been leased and only a third of the 15-story building is occupied. And it has plenty of company. Some 10 blocks away, Constellation's former headquarters at 250 W. Pratt is close to 20 percent vacant. At 36 S. Charles St., two of the floors vacated by law firm Piper Rudnick LLP's 1999 move to Mount Washington stand empty.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2004
Mercantile Bankshares Corp. said yesterday that it had agreed to sell its headquarters tower in downtown Baltimore for $51.2 million to a Virginia real estate investment company that has been buying commercial properties in the city. Mercantile, the state's largest independently owned bank, would lease back its space in the 21-story building at 2 Hopkins Plaza for at least another decade under its contract with the buyer, Harbor Group International LLC of Norfolk. The sales contract gives the buyer 30 days to complete the deal or opt out of it. The deal is set to close in mid-December.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Tucked away on the third floor of the Capitol, behind the gallery occupied by television reporters and through a door that is always closed, is a world tourists never see: a labyrinth of hallways, staircases and unmarked offices. These are some of the Senate's fabled hideaways, among the choicest real estate Washington has to offer. Each senator has a personal office in one of six buildings connected to the Capitol either by subway or by underground maze. But some also have hideaways -- small private offices inside the splendor of the Capitol itself.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Baltimore has a far higher percentage of empty industrial space than the nation as a whole, and its market for office space is expected to soften even more dramatically in 1992 than it did last year, according to a report by the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors."
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