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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
The Columbia Association (CA) is searching for a nonprofit group that serves a citywide constituency for a deal that will be hard to refuse -- free office space in downtown Columbia.About 130 square feet of office space and a secretarial alcove are available in the Columbia Association Building on Wincopin Circle in a wing where several other nonprofit groups serving Columbia share information and resources.The nonprofit association that operates Columbia's recreational facilities and runs community service programs is offering the space as an in-kind donation.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The Schaefer administration is considering borrowing $62 million to buy four Baltimore office buildings currently rented by state agencies, and another $16.5 million to build District Court facilities in Pikesville and Towson, according to a new report on state debt released this week.The spending would be in addition to possible construction of a 10-to 15-story, 270,000-square-foot office building adjacent to the state office complex at 301 W. Preston St. and purchase of the nearby NCR building at a combined estimated cost of $90.9 million.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
A surge of confidence in the business world brought hundreds of jobs to Anne Arundel County last year and helped drive down office vacancy rates, according to an economic development report to be released today.The Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp. report shows that 101 companies expanded or moved to the county and filled 2.1 million square feet of commercial space.Job growth more than doubled, to 3,225 jobs added compared with 1993's increase of 1,450."A lot of the larger companies postponed moving," said Michael S. Lofton, executive vice president of the economic development corporation.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 14, 1991
The vacancy rate for office space in downtown Baltimore is at an all-time high -- and it's expected to rise even more before it falls.New Class A space had a vacancy rate of 16 percent and older Class B space had a vacancy rate of 21 percent for a combined rate of 18.4 percent as of Sept. 30, according to CB Commercial.The rate is expected to increase because two high-rise office buildings are nearing completion downtown that will add nearly another 850,000 square feet to the market, and most of it has not been leased.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
The amount of vacant office space in the Baltimore metropolitan area fell to its lowest level in six years in 1994, the latest indication of the local commercial real estate market's gradual recovery.Colliers Pinkard's market study also states that the lack of new office construction and continued absorption -- space removed from the total inventory through leasing activity -- will continue to reduce vacancy levels, which now stand at 15.1 percent, in 1995.The vacancy figure, which represents an 11 percent drop from a year ago, dovetails with Pinkard's statistic that a record 30.8 million square feet of commercial space is occupied in the region.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke plans to appoint a task force to study converting Class B office buildings to residential use, hoping to spur downtown living while using some of the city's empty office space in the face of weak prospects for an economic recovery."
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
Baltimore developer Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse Inc. intends to purchase the former Kirk-Stieff silver-making plant in Baltimore and renovate it into office space, primarily for high-technology companies, local economic development officials said yesterday.The 80,000-square-foot building is the former home of Kirk-Stieff.Kirk-Stieff was the product of a 1979 merger of Samuel Kirk & Sons, founded in 1815, and the Stieff Co., started in 1892 by Charles C. Stieff. Both were Baltimore companies.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | October 8, 1991
A new study says lenders now control nearly 10 percent of metropolitan Baltimore's office space, reflecting the severe recession in the development industry and a market that is "overbuilt."The study released yesterday by W. C. Pinkard & Co. said that lenders have taken control of 49 buildings since January 1990, including the city's biggest office tower and 27 percent of the office space in Howard County."This is a recent phenomenon, probably over the last 18 months," said Jeffrey B. Samet, the Pinkard vice president who wrote the study.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Baltimore has sold the fire-ravaged former home of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center to a local contractor who plans to renovate the building at 409 N. Charles St. for retail and office space.The sale of the building to C & S Contractors Inc. for $100,000 ZTC was approved yesterday by a 3-0 vote of the Board of Estimates, with Council President Lawrence A. Bell III and Comptroller Joan M. Pratt abstaining.C & S will put $10,000 down and will be given a 20-year, interest-free mortgage for the remaining $90,000, officials said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
County officials have agreed to pay $15,000 as part of a settlement with two Annapolis property managers who accused the county of luring their tenants to its Heritage Office Complex by offering space at below-market rates.The county, which insisted in the consent decree that it did nothing wrong, also has agreed not to lease space at the office complex in Riva to new commercial tenants. It can, however, lease to other government agencies.The settlement has led county officials to change their minds about selling two of the four buildings it owns in the Heritage Complex.
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