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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Baltimore prosecutors might soon be packing up and leaving their cramped digs in the city's 112-year-old courthouse for a newer downtown office building. A plan being pushed by leaders in Baltimore and Annapolis would provide up to $1 million for the Baltimore state's attorney's office to rent space a few blocks from the courthouse, moving about 200 lawyers and support staff into their own quarters for the first time since the city courthouse opened in January 1900. State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein pitched the idea Friday to lawmakers in Annapolis, saying that the current configuration contributes to inefficiencies and poses public safety problems.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Columbia-based real estate developer wants to build four glassy office buildings on its waterfront property in Canton, a project that could create a kind of Harbor farther East. Corporate Office Properties Trust's proposal calls for shopping, restaurants and four buildings with about 250,000 square feet of offices on top of several stories of parking, said Stephen Budorick, the real estate investment trust's executive vice president and chief operating officer. The company has no time frame for when the project could begin because it is seeking tenants before committing to construction, Budorick said.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
Warning that downtown Baltimore is at a critical juncture, a plan to be released Thursday by the Downtown Partnership recommends that some vacant office space in the city center be converted to apartments. "New uses must be found for older towers that no longer work as office space," the group says. That is just one of several suggestions from the nonprofit, which seeks to promote and revitalize Baltimore's central business district. With the commercial vacancy rate downtown about 19 percent — and with plans for office districts on its periphery raising fears that even more commerce could be siphoned off — the Downtown Partnership's new strategic plan recommends several steps to keep downtown from stagnating further.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Two subsidiaries of Stanley Pearlman Enterprises plan to move into their own facility next year, a new 88,000-square-food seafood distribution facility in Jessup. The companies, NAFCO and Congressional Seafood Co., process and distribute seafood on the the East Coast, with delivery to supermarkets and restaurants respectively. In the last five years, both companies have grown, with Congressional's customer base expanding from 200 to more than 300 clients, creating a need for more space, said Congressional Seafood spokeswoman Kelly Morris.
NEWS
By [LARRY CARSON] | January 30, 2008
The county's effort to replace obsolete county office space has a long history: November 1999 -- County Executive James N. Robey dumped plans to renovate the George Howard Building, opting instead to pay $3.2 million for 27 acres of wooded land on Rogers Ave. near U.S. 40 as part of a plan to consolidate government agencies in new buildings. August 2000 -- Robey moved to begin selling surplus properties to help raise money for the new campus. March 2002 -- A design for two curved-glass, brick-and-stone buildings for the new campus on the Rogers Ave. site is unveiled.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Legg Mason Inc. might eliminate some of its less popular investment funds and some of its 32 offices as it continues to look at ways to operate more efficiently, the chief financial officer of the Baltimore-based money manager said Tuesday. CFO Pete Nachtwey comments about cost-cutting came in response to a question at a Citigroup financial conference in Boston. He said Legg now has more than 400 funds, and many of them haven't attracted sufficient assets. Those might be merged into other Legg funds or the money returned to investors in a move that also will "decrease the complexity of our fund complex," Nachtwey said.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | March 11, 1991
Every day looks like Sunday at 6751 Gateway. No cars are parked outside the new four-story office building, and there's not even a hint of activity inside.It has been that way since construction was completed last July.The firm that is marketing the building in the Columbia Gateway business park says it's not unusual that a buyer has not been found for an attractive 93,000-square-foot structure in Columbia after eight months. The economy has slowed things, an official says."We will come to the point where we will go from a period of excess in office space inventory to one of a shortage," said Richard Pettingill, vice president of Casey & Associates, which is marketing the building for a Virginia bank that foreclosed the loan on a major developer who encountered financial and legal problems.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
A state advisory committee is recommending that Maryland spend up to $200 million to buy existing offices and erect a new building to consolidate state agencies that rent space in Baltimore.The recommendations came in an annual report issued to the General Assembly this week by the Capital Debt Affordability Committee. The committee, composed of state officials, suggests a limit each year on how much the state can spend on capital projects, excluding transportation.While the committee rarely makes specific proposals on how to spend the capital budget, state treasurer Lucille Maurer, one of the group's five members, said the recommendations were designed to help cut the amount of money the state spends annually on rented office space.
NEWS
August 24, 2003
The former Colonel's Choice Restaurant on U.S. 40 in Aberdeen will be the home of a 13,000-square-foot professional building. Space at the Choice Business Center is expected to be available by late October. SITE Management, a development firm based in West Chester, Pa., plans to redesign the facility to include an expanded second floor, an exterior glass tower and solar domes for a contemporary solarium look, according to a company statement. Available office space will range from 1,000 square feet and up. The space will as designed around short-term tenant leasing, said Kenneth Enochs, president and owner of SITE Management.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | September 5, 1991
New construction and a poor economy last year has left 16.3 percent of the county's office and warehouse space empty, as commercial builders and brokers throughout the Baltimore region struggle to find tenants.County economic development officials released their estimateof the vacancy rate yesterday in the county's first survey of the office-warehouse space market.Of 3.4 million square feet of available office space surveyed, 18.1 percent remains empty; of 3.8 million square feet of industrial space, 14.6 percent is vacant.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
When real estate professionals Alex Kopicki and Jeff Jacobson started a development firm roughly three years ago, they figured they knew what they were doing, so they were surprised by one of their biggest problems out of the gate. "We actually had a great deal of trouble identifying and locating our first office space," Kopicki said. "It was a real head-scratcher. " And thus a new business was born. As the real estate firm, Solstice Partners, took off, the pair started noodling with plans for a website that would make it easier for a small business like theirs to find a place to rent.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The LGBTQ Life program at Johns Hopkins University may have just finished its first year on the school's Homewood campus, but it's already outgrown its digs and is expanding into a new space this coming semester. Demere Woolway, who started as director of the new lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer program last July, is moving out of a single office space in the school's Mattin Center and across North Charles Street into a larger space in the on-campus Homewood apartments, right next to the school's Office of Multicultural Affairs.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Taylor Property Group wants to build a modern five-story apartment and office building on Linwood Avenue close to Canton's O'Donnell square. The Baltimore-based company is negotiating with neighbors about the $7.5 million project, which has drawn concerns about how it will fit into the neighborhood. The new building would replace a warehouse, which the Taylor family purchased in 2013 for $1.5 million. Ross Taylor, Taylor Property's general manager, said he has met with neighborhood groups three times so far about the 1000 S. Linwood Ave. project, which would add 21 one- and two-bedroom apartments, as well as roughly 7,500-square feet of office space, to the popular East Baltimore neighborhood.
NEWS
By Alex Jackson, Baltimore Sun Media Group | July 15, 2014
A Florida firm has paid $4.5 million for Pier 7 Marina in Edgewater and plans to transform the property on the South River, which includes Coconut Joe's, into a yacht club. A&S Smith Development, which is the real estate division of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based The Catamaran Group, bought the marina in May, according to online records. While the property at 48 South River Road in Edgewater was not listed for sale, Glenn Sutton, who brokered the deal for PTR Sotheby's International Realty, said A&S Smith Development put in an offer that was too good to refuse.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Most of the upgrades at the two-building BECO Towers complex in Owings Mills are pretty standard: new windows, functioning elevators, an updated heating and cooling system. Then there are the fish tanks. The roughly 1,000-gallon aquariums, which BECO Management installed last month in the lobbies of both Mill Run Circle buildings, cost about $100,000 each. They required the commercial real estate firm to reinforce the floor and replace its cleaning supplies with fish-friendly materials.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
When a rabbi in Northwest Baltimore reported a home break-in, a Baltimore police detective called him back to investigate. But it was Sabbath and by religious custom he was not allowed to answer the phone. He let it go to voice mail. The next day he called the detective. And called. And called. Then he called his city councilwoman, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, wondering why the detective didn't have voice mail. Spector soon discovered: No detectives had voice mail in her district.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1995
The federal government is searching for office space to consolidate Internal Revenue Service operations now located downtown and in Owings Mills, a move that could affect roughly 500 employees.The proposed consolidation of several customer service and highly automated computer divisions is part of a larger IRS effort to streamline and reorganize, said agency spokesman Sam Serio."We're trying to combine functions involving people who largely work by telephone, either on taxes, order-taking or delinquent accounts," Mr. Serio said.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | June 12, 1991
Few people doubt the city government will gain additional office space.But what the new space will look like -- and how much it will cost -- remains uncertain.At Monday's council meeting, architects made a formal presentation of findings from a $35,000 study they conducted for the city.Baltimore-based Cho, Wilks & Benn Architects Inc. determined how much space is needed and reviewed 10 sites where extra space might be located.The cramped city government and 35 of its 113 employees operate in about 16,076 square feet.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
The days of the cushy corner office for top law partners may be numbered. Maybe. On average, law firms still occupy up to three times the space per worker as companies in banking, finance, insurance and technology, according to a national study by commercial real estate broker Cushman & Wakefield. But with increasing pressure on firms to lower costs, that's expected to change, which has significant implications for office space in downtown Baltimore. Law firms occupy about 13 percent of Baltimore's top-tier office space, with many smaller firms leasing in older buildings, according to a 2013 report by commercial real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle.
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