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Office Politics

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NEWS
January 6, 1995
Considering the intensity of the outrage in some quarters of Carroll County over the renovation of W. Benjamin Brown's office, one would think the new commissioner is outfitting it with a sauna, wet bar and big-screen TV. The reality is that Mr. Brown's work space is getting a long overdue upgrading that should also be done to the offices of the county's other two commissioners as well.Other than an occasional coat of paint slapped on the walls -- the former occupant of Mr. Brown's office selected peach, of all things -- nothing much has been done to these offices since the County Office Building was constructed nearly 25 years ago. The partitions are outdated, and the electrical and lighting systems inadequate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
Let's say the CEO of your company is retiring, but he's going to keep an office at headquarters and the services of the same secretary as the new guy. Awkward! Or how about working at a company where the boss just decided you can no longer work from home, a godsend once you had kids, even as she brings her baby to the nursery she built for him next to her office. Meow! This past week was a veritable schadenfreude-fest for those of us who love nothing more than complaining about our work — unless it's discovering how delightfully awful someone else's office must be. So, the Vatican: On top of the usual workplace issues that must plague the Roman Catholic Church's corporate offices — there's that impenetrable glass ceiling for any women employees, for one thing — this past week brought word of a leadership transition from, um, hell.
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NEWS
March 25, 2007
Company By Max Barry This novel eviscerates demeaning modern management techniques that treat workers as "headcounts." Though the primary target is corporate dehumanization, Barry is at his funniest lampooning the suits who tread the stage, consumed by the sound and fury of office politics that signify nothing. What if this giant maze for laboratory rats in which so many people work were actually just that? The characters are stereotypes but readers will sympathize with them, nonetheless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Karen Clark gets to the office by 6 a.m. and eats breakfast at her desk a few hours later, when most of her colleagues are arriving for the day. That's when the comments start. "Eeew, you're eating that for breakfast?!!" Clark enjoys dinner food for breakfast. Her most important meal of the day is usually last night's leftovers. Steak. Spaghetti. Fried fish. If you're thinking that's none of your business, Clark couldn't agree more. She believes her eating habits shouldn't concern her co-workers at a Baltimore financial services firm either.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Office politics, like the kind that have riveted a national TV audience for months on The Apprentice, aren't new. Backstabbing and rivalry are at least as old as the Bible. But the changing workplace of the past generation has accentuated the nature of office politics, labor psychologists and others say. With more turnover and less job security, workers are more likely to say negative things about colleagues in private to get ahead. Moreover, many companies have moved from a formal hierarchy to a more team-oriented structure, so that pleasing the boss is no longer enough to win advancement, and some workers are motivated to say negative things to vault ahead of their peers.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | May 2, 1994
All organizations, even the one-person variety, are infuriatingly political. That is, if politics infuriate you.Frankly, I love politics. And also ignore them. Both frames of mind are important to success in business or most anything else.Anyone who loves accomplishing things must learn to love politics. (Yes, I insist on the word "love.") Moreover, for better or for worse, politics are as important for dictators as for Democrats. You can't take people where they aren't willing to go. Saddam Hussein understands this as well as Mohandas Gandhi did.Politics means inducing and managing creative contention, giving people air time, building winning coalitions.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- "Office Politics" is the name of the most important course every college curriculum leaves out.You find it in every company that has more than one member in it. Skillfulness at office politics has saved many a mediocre worker. Ignorance of it has destroyed the most skillful and talented.I realized this eternal truth after discovering early in my career that I had been told a big lie. The lie was that if you study hard, keep your nose to the grindstone and don't let anyone break your spirit, you will be rewarded.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - A lot of people are wondering whether the Jayson Blair affair, which has indelibly stained The New York Times' 152-year history, resulted from affirmative action run amok. Other people are certain of it. In case you haven't heard, Mr. Blair, 27, "committed frequent acts of journalistic fraud" while covering major news events for the Times in recent months, the newspaper reported Sunday. These included fabricating comments, concocting scenes and plagiarizing material from other news sources.
FEATURES
March 3, 2000
A breezy yet diamond-hard humor runs through "What Planet Are You From?," a bawdy, brainy sex comedy geared toward smart people with a sophomoric streak. At its goofiest and gaggiest, this fish-out-of-water yarn, about a space alien who finds true love while trying to take over the world, will remind viewers of Mel Brooks. At its crudest, it recalls "There's Something About Mary." But at its wisest -- and it is surprisingly wise, in the end -- "What Planet Are You From?" evokes fond memories of director Mike Nichols and his former partner, Elaine May, who together shed a wry, cleansing light on the human condition by way of gently lethal satire.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
Let's say the CEO of your company is retiring, but he's going to keep an office at headquarters and the services of the same secretary as the new guy. Awkward! Or how about working at a company where the boss just decided you can no longer work from home, a godsend once you had kids, even as she brings her baby to the nursery she built for him next to her office. Meow! This past week was a veritable schadenfreude-fest for those of us who love nothing more than complaining about our work — unless it's discovering how delightfully awful someone else's office must be. So, the Vatican: On top of the usual workplace issues that must plague the Roman Catholic Church's corporate offices — there's that impenetrable glass ceiling for any women employees, for one thing — this past week brought word of a leadership transition from, um, hell.
NEWS
March 25, 2007
Company By Max Barry This novel eviscerates demeaning modern management techniques that treat workers as "headcounts." Though the primary target is corporate dehumanization, Barry is at his funniest lampooning the suits who tread the stage, consumed by the sound and fury of office politics that signify nothing. What if this giant maze for laboratory rats in which so many people work were actually just that? The characters are stereotypes but readers will sympathize with them, nonetheless.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Office politics, like the kind that have riveted a national TV audience for months on The Apprentice, aren't new. Backstabbing and rivalry are at least as old as the Bible. But the changing workplace of the past generation has accentuated the nature of office politics, labor psychologists and others say. With more turnover and less job security, workers are more likely to say negative things about colleagues in private to get ahead. Moreover, many companies have moved from a formal hierarchy to a more team-oriented structure, so that pleasing the boss is no longer enough to win advancement, and some workers are motivated to say negative things to vault ahead of their peers.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - A lot of people are wondering whether the Jayson Blair affair, which has indelibly stained The New York Times' 152-year history, resulted from affirmative action run amok. Other people are certain of it. In case you haven't heard, Mr. Blair, 27, "committed frequent acts of journalistic fraud" while covering major news events for the Times in recent months, the newspaper reported Sunday. These included fabricating comments, concocting scenes and plagiarizing material from other news sources.
FEATURES
March 3, 2000
A breezy yet diamond-hard humor runs through "What Planet Are You From?," a bawdy, brainy sex comedy geared toward smart people with a sophomoric streak. At its goofiest and gaggiest, this fish-out-of-water yarn, about a space alien who finds true love while trying to take over the world, will remind viewers of Mel Brooks. At its crudest, it recalls "There's Something About Mary." But at its wisest -- and it is surprisingly wise, in the end -- "What Planet Are You From?" evokes fond memories of director Mike Nichols and his former partner, Elaine May, who together shed a wry, cleansing light on the human condition by way of gently lethal satire.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 22, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- It was bad enough that NATO attackers knocked out his television station and destroyed his offices. But did they have to destroy the new shows from America?That was the lament of TV Pink program director Robert Nemecek yesterday after NATO missiles slammed into a 23-story high-rise that housed political and media offices associated with Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's regime.As he stood in front of the scorched and wrecked building, Nemecek ticked off the losses -- new episodes of "Chicago Hope" and "Friends" and 123 programs of "The Simpsons."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- "Office Politics" is the name of the most important course every college curriculum leaves out.You find it in every company that has more than one member in it. Skillfulness at office politics has saved many a mediocre worker. Ignorance of it has destroyed the most skillful and talented.I realized this eternal truth after discovering early in my career that I had been told a big lie. The lie was that if you study hard, keep your nose to the grindstone and don't let anyone break your spirit, you will be rewarded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Karen Clark gets to the office by 6 a.m. and eats breakfast at her desk a few hours later, when most of her colleagues are arriving for the day. That's when the comments start. "Eeew, you're eating that for breakfast?!!" Clark enjoys dinner food for breakfast. Her most important meal of the day is usually last night's leftovers. Steak. Spaghetti. Fried fish. If you're thinking that's none of your business, Clark couldn't agree more. She believes her eating habits shouldn't concern her co-workers at a Baltimore financial services firm either.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 11, 1994
Washington -- With ice-cream cone in hand, Christian Green studied the scene in the storefront -- a partially clad woman crawling on a cement-like floor and, hovering above, the likenesses of two nude men hanging by their genitals.He inched closer to the paned glass and then stepped back again. His eyes followed the rope as it looped over a beam and fell taut where it strung the men up. He spotted the splotches of red paint in the palms of the male figures, the woman rising up, her brassiere hiked above her breasts, her underwear and pantyhose pulled down about an ankle.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1997
HE IS known to his colleagues as "the conscience of the Maryland Senate."And last week, in the final hours of the General Assembly's 1997 session, it was obvious why.Rising to deliver one of the more impassioned speeches all year, Senate Majority Leader Clarence W. Blount was able to do what no one else had seemed to do in the previous 89 days.Just before a critical vote on the city schools deal, he focused the attention of the legislature where it belonged -- on the schoolchildren of Baltimore City.
NEWS
January 6, 1995
Considering the intensity of the outrage in some quarters of Carroll County over the renovation of W. Benjamin Brown's office, one would think the new commissioner is outfitting it with a sauna, wet bar and big-screen TV. The reality is that Mr. Brown's work space is getting a long overdue upgrading that should also be done to the offices of the county's other two commissioners as well.Other than an occasional coat of paint slapped on the walls -- the former occupant of Mr. Brown's office selected peach, of all things -- nothing much has been done to these offices since the County Office Building was constructed nearly 25 years ago. The partitions are outdated, and the electrical and lighting systems inadequate.
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