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By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 24, 1992
The solemn-faced man on the video screen has pursed lips, a receding hairline and a warning."It needs almost a religious conversion," he cautions as he calls for commitment: "The actual battles are fought on every desk in the organization -- in desk drawers . . . in the minds of all of us."The threat he warns about is paper. Office paper. And he is serious.The glut of paper piled up on desks, overloading file cabinets and spilling from bookcases can foil efficiency and make important documents impossible to find.
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FEATURES
November 27, 2012
Alison Rudo grew up in Philadelphia and remembers many class trips to historic sites around the city. “It was like going back in time,” recalls the Elkridge mother of two. “Instead of just reading about Ben Franklin, you're actually walking the same streets he walked and you could see the Liberty Bell right in front of you.” Earlier this year Rudo took her 11-year-old daughter, Emily, to Philadelphia and got to relive many of those memories....
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FEATURES
November 27, 2012
Alison Rudo grew up in Philadelphia and remembers many class trips to historic sites around the city. “It was like going back in time,” recalls the Elkridge mother of two. “Instead of just reading about Ben Franklin, you're actually walking the same streets he walked and you could see the Liberty Bell right in front of you.” Earlier this year Rudo took her 11-year-old daughter, Emily, to Philadelphia and got to relive many of those memories....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Seago and Kate Seago,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 19, 2000
Trends analyst Arnold Brown chuckles when someone mentions the paperless office. "I think we'll see it with the Second Coming," he says. "The paperless office is going to require a massive mutation of the human species. We need to have paper; we need hard copy." In the late 1970s and early '80s, "paperless office" and "office automation" were major buzzwords. Newspapers, magazines and trade journals used up forests writing about how computers would make the printed word obsolete. Some office gurus predicted that secretaries and clerks would become as obsolete as hatpins and that file cabinets and in-boxes would become museum curiosities.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
Susquehannock Environmental Center, a non-profit recycling station near Bel Air, will begin accepting mixed paper on Tuesday.Used paper products, including magazines, junk mail, cereal boxes and egg cartons can be dropped off at the center. Susquehannock is at 700 N. Tollgate Road near Harford Mall, just off U.S. 1.The center will continue to accept used newspapers and certain grades of office paper, including computer paper.Susquehannock officials said paper products should be separated by mixed paper, office paper and newspapers.
FEATURES
By John Javna | October 20, 1990
American workers throw out the equivalent of more than 1,500 trees -- recyclable letterhead stationery, memos, copier paper, typing paper and computer paper -- every week.We throw out about 85 percent of the office paper we use -- enough to build a 12-foot-high wall of paper from New York to California.Every time we recycle a ton of it, we save the equivalent of 380 gallons of oil and 7,000 gallons of water.What does your office use that can be recycled?*WHITE PAPER* It includes: white computer paper, stationery (letterhead and bond)
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
State government was in a bind when a contractor on it months-old recycling program went bankrupt in 1990.That's when The Athelas Institute in Columbia stepped in to help. By collecting, sorting and baling hundreds of tons of office paper, Athelas workers saved the program, state officials say.The institute, a private, nonprofit organization that trains developmentally disabled people and places them in jobs, recently received the state environment department's Environmental Excellence Award and the governor's Salute to Excellence for its involvement in the program, which aims to reduce solid waste by 20 percent by 1994.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller | July 17, 1991
This all started with a cardboard box that a recycling-minded colleague brought in several months ago. He plunked it down between two desks in The Howard County Sun office."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
County recycling officials working to change the throw-away mind-setof Carroll residents haven't neglected to rid their own rank and file of wasteful habits.Tons of newspaper, office paper and aluminumproducts discarded by county employees that previously would have consumed costly space in Carroll landfills now is placed on Wednesdays in county office building hallways for eventual delivery to recyclingfacilities.The county's in-house recycling effort -- which takes place at the main County Office Building in Westminster, satellite government offices, the Board of Education, several schools, Carroll Circuit Courts and the County Detention Center -- started in December 1989, two months after its first recycling coordinator was appointed.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | April 11, 1991
There's something ironic about county bureaucrats' carrying off little potted trees back to the same offices where they shuffle through mountains of paper.But it seemed a fitting symbol of a new recycling effort launched yesterday in 14 county office buildings."You are the key to making our paper-recycling program a success.We're asking citizens to recycle. We have to set the example," County Executive Robert R. Neall told the 41 recycling captains who were commissioned with the presentation of potted white pine seedlings.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
State government was in a bind when a contractor on it months-old recycling program went bankrupt in 1990.That's when The Athelas Institute in Columbia stepped in to help. By collecting, sorting and baling hundreds of tons of office paper, Athelas workers saved the program, state officials say.The institute, a private, nonprofit organization that trains developmentally disabled people and places them in jobs, recently received the state environment department's Environmental Excellence Award and the governor's Salute to Excellence for its involvement in the program, which aims to reduce solid waste by 20 percent by 1994.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1993
New program reduces paper in the workplaceAccording to Nine to Five Software of Boulder, Colo., we chopped down 350 million trees last year to make 3,360 billion sheets of office paper.That fact bothered company President E.R. Haas so much that he created the PaperLess Printer, a program aimed at reducing the amount of paper used in the workplace.Most word-processing and desk-top publishing programs recognize the need to display a reduced-size preview mode. It lets you see a document as it would appear on the printed page.
NEWS
By John Morris and John Morris,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
More than 50 percent of the paper goods purchased by the county government are recycled products, including the toilet paper and tissues used in public restrooms.But for County Executive Robert R. Neall, it's not enough that the county uses recycled products.Mr. Neall wants county workers to triple the amount of office paper recycled during the next three years.Anne Arundel is one of 32 counties nationwide, including Prince George's and Montgomery, to have joined the Washington-based National Office Paper Recycling Challenge.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
Susquehannock Environmental Center, a non-profit recycling station near Bel Air, will begin accepting mixed paper on Tuesday.Used paper products, including magazines, junk mail, cereal boxes and egg cartons can be dropped off at the center. Susquehannock is at 700 N. Tollgate Road near Harford Mall, just off U.S. 1.The center will continue to accept used newspapers and certain grades of office paper, including computer paper.Susquehannock officials said paper products should be separated by mixed paper, office paper and newspapers.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 24, 1992
The solemn-faced man on the video screen has pursed lips, a receding hairline and a warning."It needs almost a religious conversion," he cautions as he calls for commitment: "The actual battles are fought on every desk in the organization -- in desk drawers . . . in the minds of all of us."The threat he warns about is paper. Office paper. And he is serious.The glut of paper piled up on desks, overloading file cabinets and spilling from bookcases can foil efficiency and make important documents impossible to find.
NEWS
November 6, 1991
Western Maryland College, which began a comprehensive campus recycling effort last December, has entered a second phase.The money forPhase II was provided through a Challenge Grant from developer Martin K. P. Hill of Manchester and from the members of the Class of '91.Phase I called for the recycling of newspapers and office paper, as well as aluminum cans. A long, red metal bin with four compartments was purchased with the help of the Carroll County Public Works Department to house the initial recyclables.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | September 1, 1991
When Browning-Ferris Industries executives broke ground for a $4 million recycling center in Elkridge last week, they did so knowing their investment had already started paying off.The center, slated tostart operating in January, is the cornerstone of BFI's leap forwardin competing for Howard County's curbside recycling business.Workers at the facility will separate types of containers, such as glass jars, aluminum cans and plastic bottles, as well as types of paper products, such as office paper and cardboard, from the mixed containers and mixed paper.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1993
New program reduces paper in the workplaceAccording to Nine to Five Software of Boulder, Colo., we chopped down 350 million trees last year to make 3,360 billion sheets of office paper.That fact bothered company President E.R. Haas so much that he created the PaperLess Printer, a program aimed at reducing the amount of paper used in the workplace.Most word-processing and desk-top publishing programs recognize the need to display a reduced-size preview mode. It lets you see a document as it would appear on the printed page.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | September 1, 1991
When Browning-Ferris Industries executives broke ground for a $4 million recycling center in Elkridge last week, they did so knowing their investment had already started paying off.The center, slated tostart operating in January, is the cornerstone of BFI's leap forwardin competing for Howard County's curbside recycling business.Workers at the facility will separate types of containers, such as glass jars, aluminum cans and plastic bottles, as well as types of paper products, such as office paper and cardboard, from the mixed containers and mixed paper.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller | July 17, 1991
This all started with a cardboard box that a recycling-minded colleague brought in several months ago. He plunked it down between two desks in The Howard County Sun office."
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