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NEWS
October 24, 1995
An article in Monday's Carroll County section about a Halloween walking tour of historic sites in Westminster should have credited Jesse Glass' book, "Ghosts and Legends of Carroll County, Maryland," for much of the material presented by the county Office of Tourism.The Sun regrets the error.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Howard County Tourism Inc.'s visitor information center has been on the back of the post office building in historic Ellicott City for almost a decade. But it took new paint, shutters, flags and signs to get many county residents to notice it for the first time. "Since [the redecoration] happened, a number of people have said ` ... I never knew you were here,'" said Ed Lilley, visitor center manager. In fact, the office saw a 50 percent increase in customers from 2003 to 2004, said Executive Director Rachelina Bonacci.
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BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | May 16, 1991
Maryland's tourism industry generates about $5 billion annually to the state economy, and Gov. William Donald Schaefer wants state resident to do more to attract returning visitors."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Howard County Tourism Inc.'s visitor information center has been on the back of the post office building in historic Ellicott City for almost a decade. But it took new paint, shutters, flags and signs to get many county residents to notice it for the first time. "Since [the redecoration] happened, a number of people have said ` ... I never knew you were here,' " said Ed Lilley, visitor center manager. In fact, the office saw a 50 percent increase in customers between 2003 and this year, said Executive Director Rachelina Bonacci.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1996
From Fort McHenry to Fort Washington, from a Garrett County grist mill to a St. Michaels maritime museum, from the tobacco plantations of the state's first capital in St. Mary's County to the Georgian gems of Annapolis, Maryland offers history aplenty.Now, hoping to tap into a booming market for history-related tourism, Maryland's Office of Tourism has assembled a free, 32-page promotional guide detailing hundreds of attractions throughout the state."Maryland Celebrates History A Guide to Maryland's Historical Attractions" includes concise descriptions of attractions, maps, timetables of historic events, color photos, phone numbers, admission prices and suggested reading.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 28, 1997
Carroll County Office of Tourism has received a $20,000 state grant, money to help advertise the county's burgeoning tourism industry, a $32 million-a-year business.The grant will pay for printing 25,000 additional 1997 calendars, which tout local events and tourist stops.The "Calendar of Events" lists exhibits, farmers' markets, church suppers, holiday events, theatrical productions, tournaments and annual traditions.The front of the 1997 booklet features a picture of Union Mills Homestead, which is celebrating its bicentennial with a series of events.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | September 28, 1990
The canoe race depicted on an award-winning poster will be one of the last seasonal events in Maryland to be promoted by the Maryland Office of Tourism Development.In the future, the office plans to stop advertising single events, such as a canoe race, and start promoting themes, such as antiquing. It is doing this, in part, to appeal to tourists from out of state as well as Marylanders."That allows us to publicize a lot more things," said Fran Severn, editorial coordinator for the Office of Tourism, referring to the state's campaign plan.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1995
Michael S. Whipple, general manager of the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel, has received the "Maryland Travel Person of the Year Award" from the state Office of Tourism Development for service to the industry.Tourism Partnership awards, presented at the 15th annual Governor's Tourism Conference, which ended yesterday, went to: Gangplank Ragtime Band at Phillips' Restaurant in Harborplace, for serving as a goodwill ambassador for the state; Mary Junck, publisher of The Sun, for the paper's redesign, its expanded Business section and its new beat to cover tourism; the Baltimore Business Journal, for its special section on conventions; Icelandair, for helping promote Maryland and moving its headquarters from New York to Columbia; the State Highway Administration and the State Police, for a partnership to ensure tourists' safety.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
If the budget crunch worsens, the Carroll County Office of Tourism may "fall by the wayside," Commissioner Donald I. Dell told the Carroll County Tourism Association yesterday.But Commissioner Julia W. Gouge was friendlier to the association when she talked to the 60 members gathered for a meeting.Both commissioners praised the association's efforts to bring business to the county. But they differed on the tourism office, a county agency that coordinates and publicizes many activities for the association.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
If the Carroll County Office of Tourism falls under the budget ax, county businesses will suffer, a Hampstead restaurateur contended yesterday."The Office of Tourism is an asset to the county," said Frank C. Kosmakos, owner of Maria's in Hampstead. "It does much of the promotion work needed to draw people to the county."The office coordinates and gets the word out for businesses, who don't have time to do that."Mr. Kosmakos' comments came as a reaction to the suggestion Tuesday by County Commissioner Donald I. Dell that the tourism office might be cut from the county budget in the current money crunch.
BUSINESS
By Penny Hartman and Penny Hartman,Special to Baltimoresun.com | May 24, 2004
Hurricane Isabel left such an impression on the Tilghman Island Inn on Maryland's Eastern Shore -- about $400,000 worth -- that its owners gave it a permanent marker. The inn's remodeled restaurant now is called Isabel's. "She was the one that destroyed it, and she stayed for awhile -- so we figured we'd have some fun with it," said Jack Redmond, who has co-owned the inn for 15 years. "It's better than crying. "We say, 'She came, she saw, she conquered' -- and we redecorated," Redmond added.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
The man who just took over the job of strengthening Maryland's tourism industry says he is determined to lure new visitors despite the state's spending cuts. Maryland will likely spend even less on tourism advertising this year than in recent years, when it lagged behind most of its neighboring states on promotion efforts. "What I'm here to do is to make sure we get the best bang for our effort with the marketing dollars we have," Dennis M. Castleman, new director of the Office of Tourism Development, said late last week.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2001
Passion, pageantry and economic-impact statistics converged yesterday at the Legislative Summit on Tourism, where about 300 people gathered in Annapolis to discuss the state of the industry. The recurring themes among speakers were the need for more marketing dollars and a renewed focus on what tourism can mean to Maryland. "We're here because we can do better," said House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., the prime sponsor of the event held at the Radisson Hotel. "Maryland is on fire and is doing a tremendous job, but there's not a person in the room who doesn't believe we can do better.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
On Monday, the state tourism industry will gather in Annapolis for one of its most significant meetings ever. Creating a tourism office that reports directly to the governor and nearly doubling the tourism budget over five years will be at the top of the agenda at the meeting, which is expected to have the attention of many lawmakers. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. is the prime sponsor of the Tourism Legislative Summit, to be held at the Radisson Hotel. "The event is intended to highlight the focus that tourism should be getting in the big picture of Maryland's future," Taylor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 26, 2000
Sheaves of cornstalks, piles of pumpkins, baskets of apples and pots of chrysanthemums decorated the State House lobby in Annapolis. Melodies from a string quartet greeted guests at the Maryland You Are Beautiful reception, as did a cocktail buffet -- all to honor the top volunteers from Baltimore and Maryland's 23 counties. They weren't hard to spot in the crowd of 180. Each of the "Maryland's Most Beautiful People" award winners wore a corsage or boutonniere featuring a small black-eyed Susan, the state flower.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
The annual Maryland Wine Festival draws thousands to Westminster every September. This year, it may draw tourists by the bus load.The 14th festival, scheduled for Sept. 20 and 21 at Carroll County Farm Museum, made the Top 100 Events list compiled by the American Bus Association, an honor it shares with one other state event: the Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival in Annapolis."Tour buses read the list for places to go," said Dottie Freeman, executive director of the museum. "We may get buses from everywhere."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
While they wait for their meals to appear, many diners in Carroll County restaurants read those little red table tents.The tents are paper brochures, folded into triangles and placed at mid-table or over there by the salt and pepper. Restaurant owners say the tents are becoming as popular as menus.The county Office of Tourism developed the tents to tout local holiday happenings and offered them to fast food and formal restaurants. A quick read lets diners know what to do and where to go after their meals.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Sign onto a computer anywhere in Maryland and find out what is happening in Carroll County.The 1995 Calendar of Events, published by the Office of Tourism, will be on-line in Carroll County Public Library computers by March 1.Last spring, Carroll County became the first county in the state to publish its events electronically, although in an incomplete version. Tourism officials, pleased with the response, plan to computerize the full calendar every year.Scott Reinhart, library assistant director for technical and support services, said it would be difficult to calculate how many callers accessed the calendar, but the dial-in lines are continually in use.Now, an electronic version of the printed calendar gives a user a list of activities and events in Carroll County from March through December.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 28, 1997
Carroll County Office of Tourism has received a $20,000 state grant, money to help advertise the county's burgeoning tourism industry, a $32 million-a-year business.The grant will pay for printing 25,000 additional 1997 calendars, which tout local events and tourist stops.The "Calendar of Events" lists exhibits, farmers' markets, church suppers, holiday events, theatrical productions, tournaments and annual traditions.The front of the 1997 booklet features a picture of Union Mills Homestead, which is celebrating its bicentennial with a series of events.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1996
From Fort McHenry to Fort Washington, from a Garrett County grist mill to a St. Michaels maritime museum, from the tobacco plantations of the state's first capital in St. Mary's County to the Georgian gems of Annapolis, Maryland offers history aplenty.Now, hoping to tap into a booming market for history-related tourism, Maryland's Office of Tourism has assembled a free, 32-page promotional guide detailing hundreds of attractions throughout the state."Maryland Celebrates History A Guide to Maryland's Historical Attractions" includes concise descriptions of attractions, maps, timetables of historic events, color photos, phone numbers, admission prices and suggested reading.
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