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BUSINESS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Move over aluminum cans and waste paper, the Community ResourceBank of Maryland is recycling something heftier: office equipment.For a nominal annual membership fee, CRB will provide non-profit organizations with used and surplus office furniture and equipment.The various equipment includes desks, computers and work stations donated by businesses to foster corporate goodwill in the community."This is unique," said Darlene Frank, a volunteer who heads CRB's public relations committee. "It's the first time surplus equipment is being offered."
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Every hour on the hour, Baltimore police dispatcher John McCall had to remind officers on the street to wear their seat belts. "All units," he began, "please remember to buckle up so you can hear this announcement tomorrow. " That was more than a decade ago, and McCall's brand of police shtick is no longer a fixture on the radio. But new reminders will be coming for officers who disregard the rules and drive without seat belts, or who walk in scuffed-up shoes, or who misuse office equipment, or misspend money.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1990
Nearly all American offices have copiers, and the vast majority have facsimile machines and personal computers, according to a survey released by Ricoh Corp., a leading office equipment company.The survey, "Issues in the Office," also found that midlevel managers are increasingly heavy users of these machines, sometimes using them more than their support staff.The survey of U.S. offices found that 94 percent have copiers, 87 percent have personal computers, 78 percent have fax machines and 57 percent have laser printers.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | January 31, 2001
Southern District Burglary: Computer equipment, a postal scale and other office equipment, all valued at more than $7,000, were stolen Monday from the Gordon Plan Co. warehouse in the 700 block of E. Fort Ave. Parkville Precinct Theft: A West Baltimore woman, 25, stole 15 packs of camera film--valued at $231--from the Kmart store in the 8900 block of Waltham Woods Road on Monday. She was given a citation to appear in court to answer theft charges.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | January 31, 2001
Southern District Burglary: Computer equipment, a postal scale and other office equipment, all valued at more than $7,000, were stolen Monday from the Gordon Plan Co. warehouse in the 700 block of E. Fort Ave. Parkville Precinct Theft: A West Baltimore woman, 25, stole 15 packs of camera film--valued at $231--from the Kmart store in the 8900 block of Waltham Woods Road on Monday. She was given a citation to appear in court to answer theft charges.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | January 14, 1991
The days when you could run a home office or a small business with a desk, hat rack and manual typewriter are long gone. To be competitive and efficient in this age of electronics a small business needs sophisticated tools -- computers, copiers, facsimile machines and telephone answering and switching equipment, for instance.All these tools come with a price tag that strains the financial resources of budding entrepreneurs. Yet, that is not the core problem. Basic office equipment is changing so rapidly that it is almost certain you can get more advanced tools for less money (( next month or next year.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1995
Community workers at Jubilee Baltimore lost more than their founder this week when Benton Neal Harris Jr. died.They also lost most of their office equipment -- taken by a burglar the day they attended Mr. Harris' memorial service.While mourners crowded into a North Baltimore church on Tuesday to laud Mr. Harris for founding Jubilee 15 years ago to house and employ the poor, someone stole the keys to Jubilee's Southeast Baltimore office, staff members believe.When the workers arrived at work Wednesday morning, they discovered two computers, two printers, a fax machine, an electric typewriter, a wall clock and the sugar bowl and creamer were missing, said Charles Duff, president of Jubilee Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Every hour on the hour, Baltimore police dispatcher John McCall had to remind officers on the street to wear their seat belts. "All units," he began, "please remember to buckle up so you can hear this announcement tomorrow. " That was more than a decade ago, and McCall's brand of police shtick is no longer a fixture on the radio. But new reminders will be coming for officers who disregard the rules and drive without seat belts, or who walk in scuffed-up shoes, or who misuse office equipment, or misspend money.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1993
Microsoft Corp., the software giant, is trying to extend its powerful reach beyond the computer to the rest of office machinery -- the copier, the printer, the fax, even the phone.For more than a year, William H. Gates, 37, the company's chairman, has circled the globe, signing up equipment makers to become part of his vision of an office in which machines can pass work from one to another seamlessly, thanks to Microsoft software.Since Microsoft succeeded in setting the dominant standard in personal computer operating software, Mr. Gates gets a hearing when he presents a vision of another standard in software architecture.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | May 8, 1991
County police arrested a Jessup man Sunday and charged him with stealing up to $100,000 worth of computers and office equipment from Columbia businesses.Police suspect that Sherman Wayne Lee, 34, of the9900 block of Guilford Road, committed five break-ins during a rash of burglaries in March and April, said Sgt. Gary L. Gardner, a countypolice spokesman.Investigators, acting on a search warrant, found approximately $30,000 worth of the stolen equipment Monday at Lee's home, which they have returned to the businesses, Gardner said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
County officials promised yesterday to help the local chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving search for rent-free office space, computers and furniture in the wake of severe funding cuts by the national organization.In a meeting with the County Commissioners yesterday, Linda Dennis, local chapter president, said without assistance from local officials, the Carroll office in Westminster could be forced to close by year's end.She told the commissioners that the group's budget has been slashed from $18,000 to $4,000 this fiscal year, which began July 1. Dennis said the chapter might receive an additional $4,000, but that is not guaranteed.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 1998
STAMFORD, Conn. -- Xerox Corp. said yesterday that it will sell its Crum & Forster Holdings Inc. subsidiary to Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. for $680 million, completing its five-year exit from the financial services industry.Fairfax, a Toronto insurance and investment management company, will pay Xerox $565 million in cash for the commercial property and casualty insurer and assume $115 million of its debt.The purchase is the latest by Fairfax Chairman Prem Watsa, who has built a reputation for buying and turning around insurers.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1995
Community workers at Jubilee Baltimore lost more than their founder this week when Benton Neal Harris Jr. died.They also lost most of their office equipment -- taken by a burglar the day they attended Mr. Harris' memorial service.While mourners crowded into a North Baltimore church on Tuesday to laud Mr. Harris for founding Jubilee 15 years ago to house and employ the poor, someone stole the keys to Jubilee's Southeast Baltimore office, staff members believe.When the workers arrived at work Wednesday morning, they discovered two computers, two printers, a fax machine, an electric typewriter, a wall clock and the sugar bowl and creamer were missing, said Charles Duff, president of Jubilee Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1993
Microsoft Corp., the software giant, is trying to extend its powerful reach beyond the computer to the rest of office machinery -- the copier, the printer, the fax, even the phone.For more than a year, William H. Gates, 37, the company's chairman, has circled the globe, signing up equipment makers to become part of his vision of an office in which machines can pass work from one to another seamlessly, thanks to Microsoft software.Since Microsoft succeeded in setting the dominant standard in personal computer operating software, Mr. Gates gets a hearing when he presents a vision of another standard in software architecture.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | May 8, 1991
County police arrested a Jessup man Sunday and charged him with stealing up to $100,000 worth of computers and office equipment from Columbia businesses.Police suspect that Sherman Wayne Lee, 34, of the9900 block of Guilford Road, committed five break-ins during a rash of burglaries in March and April, said Sgt. Gary L. Gardner, a countypolice spokesman.Investigators, acting on a search warrant, found approximately $30,000 worth of the stolen equipment Monday at Lee's home, which they have returned to the businesses, Gardner said.
BUSINESS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
Move over aluminum cans and waste paper, the Community ResourceBank of Maryland is recycling something heftier: office equipment.For a nominal annual membership fee, CRB will provide non-profit organizations with used and surplus office furniture and equipment.The various equipment includes desks, computers and work stations donated by businesses to foster corporate goodwill in the community."This is unique," said Darlene Frank, a volunteer who heads CRB's public relations committee. "It's the first time surplus equipment is being offered."
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
County officials promised yesterday to help the local chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving search for rent-free office space, computers and furniture in the wake of severe funding cuts by the national organization.In a meeting with the County Commissioners yesterday, Linda Dennis, local chapter president, said without assistance from local officials, the Carroll office in Westminster could be forced to close by year's end.She told the commissioners that the group's budget has been slashed from $18,000 to $4,000 this fiscal year, which began July 1. Dennis said the chapter might receive an additional $4,000, but that is not guaranteed.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 12, 1998
STAMFORD, Conn. -- Xerox Corp. said yesterday that it will sell its Crum & Forster Holdings Inc. subsidiary to Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. for $680 million, completing its five-year exit from the financial services industry.Fairfax, a Toronto insurance and investment management company, will pay Xerox $565 million in cash for the commercial property and casualty insurer and assume $115 million of its debt.The purchase is the latest by Fairfax Chairman Prem Watsa, who has built a reputation for buying and turning around insurers.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | January 14, 1991
The days when you could run a home office or a small business with a desk, hat rack and manual typewriter are long gone. To be competitive and efficient in this age of electronics a small business needs sophisticated tools -- computers, copiers, facsimile machines and telephone answering and switching equipment, for instance.All these tools come with a price tag that strains the financial resources of budding entrepreneurs. Yet, that is not the core problem. Basic office equipment is changing so rapidly that it is almost certain you can get more advanced tools for less money (( next month or next year.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1990
Nearly all American offices have copiers, and the vast majority have facsimile machines and personal computers, according to a survey released by Ricoh Corp., a leading office equipment company.The survey, "Issues in the Office," also found that midlevel managers are increasingly heavy users of these machines, sometimes using them more than their support staff.The survey of U.S. offices found that 94 percent have copiers, 87 percent have personal computers, 78 percent have fax machines and 57 percent have laser printers.
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