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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
James Fitzpatrick leans back in a huge black office chair with wheels and points at a projection on a screen in the front of the classroom, not far from the Soccer Barbie dolls and a clock featuring the portrait of French writer Voltaire. "Here is the question," he says in a deep, booming, intense voice. "Is postimpressionism a movement of art or artists?" ("Artists," of course, is the answer he elicits from a student.) Fitz, as he is called by everyone, has been teaching for decades, the last 10 years at Catonsville High School.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
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NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Murder, Detective Edward Brown figured. Murder, plain and simple.But there was no body. And everything the Baltimore homicide detective found in that trucking company office five years ago told him he would never find the body of Eddy Robert Crane, a South Baltimore businessman who hasn't been heard from since."
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Standing on the mound at Ed Smith Stadium on Monday afternoon, with 30 mph winds swirling around him and ESPN cameras capturing his every move, Orioles left-hander T.J. McFarland was the perfect picture of calm. Sitting in an office chair in Bedford Park, Ill., huddled over an MLB.com video feed that wouldn't work, Tim McFarland wasn't exactly as collected as his 23-year-old son. "I'm the only one that didn't watch it live on ESPN. I had the MLB feed at the office and the damn thing went out two pitches into the first batter.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Standing on the mound at Ed Smith Stadium on Monday afternoon, with 30 mph winds swirling around him and ESPN cameras capturing his every move, Orioles left-hander T.J. McFarland was the perfect picture of calm. Sitting in an office chair in Bedford Park, Ill., huddled over an MLB.com video feed that wouldn't work, Tim McFarland wasn't exactly as collected as his 23-year-old son. "I'm the only one that didn't watch it live on ESPN. I had the MLB feed at the office and the damn thing went out two pitches into the first batter.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The bleachers have been folded up against the walls, leaving only a few bench spots for the smattering of parents and siblings in a nearly empty Baltimore City Community College gym. On the right baseline stands a 6-foot-1 shooting guard who might weigh 175 pounds.  At the extended free-throw line sits an office chair. In a matter of seconds, the Nike Baltimore Elite player charges toward the nondescript piece of furniture at a speed normally reserved for football combines, not an AAU basketball practice.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
Freshly sprung from college in 1979, I was giddy with excitement after landing my first "real" job. Hired as a publishing house secretary, I could barely comprehend all the perks coming my way. Paid vacation! A business card with my name on it! My elation fell flat, however, when I saw the hand-me-down office chair parked in front of my desk: a lumpish gray cube, upholstered with what seemed a hybrid of burlap and sandpaper. Dubious stains splattered the seat, which was so low-slung that while typing I looked like a chimpanzee swatting at bananas above my head.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 10, 2004
If you and your back are fed up with sitting at a desk all day, you might consider swapping your office chair for a large, vinyl Swiss ball, the kind found in health clubs across the country. Socially, such a change might be difficult. Your colleagues might joke that you resemble a giant bird hatching an egg. But from a physical standpoint, getting rid of the office chair for even a few hours a day can help alleviate stiffness, flashes of sciatica and a sore lower back. The simple act of sitting is "the occupational hazard of the century," said Cheryl Bennett, an ergonomic specialist at California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who helps fit people in chairs.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 3, 2001
Carroll Commissioner Donald I. Dell found three silk ties draped across his office chair when he arrived at work yesterday. He knew immediately they were parting gifts from Robert A. "Max" Bair, who retired Friday after 31 years in the county's employ, most recently as zoning administrator and special assistant to the board of commissioners. All three ties were predominantly maroon, matching the upholstery on the commissioner's chair. They were just the fashion accessory that Dell, known for his eclectic tie collection, would appreciate.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The bleachers have been folded up against the walls, leaving only a few bench spots for the smattering of parents and siblings in a nearly empty Baltimore City Community College gym. On the right baseline stands a 6-foot-1 shooting guard who might weigh 175 pounds.  At the extended free-throw line sits an office chair. In a matter of seconds, the Nike Baltimore Elite player charges toward the nondescript piece of furniture at a speed normally reserved for football combines, not an AAU basketball practice.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
James Fitzpatrick leans back in a huge black office chair with wheels and points at a projection on a screen in the front of the classroom, not far from the Soccer Barbie dolls and a clock featuring the portrait of French writer Voltaire. "Here is the question," he says in a deep, booming, intense voice. "Is postimpressionism a movement of art or artists?" ("Artists," of course, is the answer he elicits from a student.) Fitz, as he is called by everyone, has been teaching for decades, the last 10 years at Catonsville High School.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
Freshly sprung from college in 1979, I was giddy with excitement after landing my first "real" job. Hired as a publishing house secretary, I could barely comprehend all the perks coming my way. Paid vacation! A business card with my name on it! My elation fell flat, however, when I saw the hand-me-down office chair parked in front of my desk: a lumpish gray cube, upholstered with what seemed a hybrid of burlap and sandpaper. Dubious stains splattered the seat, which was so low-slung that while typing I looked like a chimpanzee swatting at bananas above my head.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Murder, Detective Edward Brown figured. Murder, plain and simple.But there was no body. And everything the Baltimore homicide detective found in that trucking company office five years ago told him he would never find the body of Eddy Robert Crane, a South Baltimore businessman who hasn't been heard from since."
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES AND JULIE BYKOWICZ and GUS G. SENTEMENTES AND JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTERS | January 15, 2006
On the streets, they're known as "knockers" for their aggressive style. The Baltimore Police Department calls them "flex squads" - teams of officers given the freedom to chase down suspected criminals in neighborhoods dominated by drug dealing and violence. But as one flex squad's officers cruised the Southwestern District, questions mounted about their activities. Defense attorneys, prosecutors and community members say they have heard for years about allegations of misconduct that included planted drugs and troublesome practices about how suspects were treated and charged.
NEWS
March 11, 1996
An 18-year-old Westminster man, accused of molesting his younger brother over a three-year period, was convicted of child abuse Thursday after agreeing that a prosecutor's statement of facts would be the only evidence in his case.In exchange for an Alford plea -- in which a defendant declines to plead guilty but concedes the evidence is against him -- prosecutors dropped the remaining charges against him, which included sodomy and second-degree sexual offense.The man and his brother, 15 -- whose names are not being used to protect their privacy -- were similarly abused about five years ago, prosecutors said Friday.
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