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Offensive Linemen

SPORTS
By Rich Hofmann and Rich Hofmann,Philadelphia Daily News | October 27, 2007
"An offensive player is permitted to block an opponent by contacting him with his head, shoulders, hands, and/or outer surface of the forearm, or with any other part of his body. A blocker may use his arms, or open or closed hands, to contact an opponent on or outside the opponent's frame (the body of an opponent below the neck that is presented to the blocker). If a blocker's arms or hands are outside an opponent's frame, it is a foul if the blocker materially restricts him. The blocker immediately must work to bring his hands inside the opponent's frame, and as the play develops, the blocker is permitted to work for and maintain his position against an opponent, provided that he does not illegally clip or illegally push from behind."
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SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY | October 8, 2007
Survival game The Ravens' offense managed only three field goals but it left satisfied. After losing two offensive linemen (left tackle Adam Terry and center Mike Flynn) on one series in the first half, the Ravens had to gut it out with three rookie blockers. Plus, with Todd Heap and Daniel Wilcox sidelined, the Ravens played with one healthy tight end (Quinn Sypniewski). Back and kicking After uncharacteristically missing two field-goal attempts a week ago, Matt Stover carried the Ravens offensively with three field goals yesterday, converting from 26, 32 and 49 yards.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Sun reporter | October 8, 2007
It was a painful reunion yesterday with Trent Dilfer, but it had nothing to do with the Super Bowl-winning quarterback's one-time grudge against the Ravens. Entering the game without four starters and then losing two offensive linemen in one series, the Ravens persevered in an ugly yet satisfying 9-7 victory over the San Francisco 49ers before 67,885 at Monster Park. Injuries continue to take their toll on the Ravens, who were down to three rookie blockers, one healthy tight end and no backup offensive linemen.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Near the end of yesterday's draft luncheon, Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome produced the biggest revelation of the day when he said there could be a quarterback that the team would take with the 29th pick of the first round. A few minutes after the news conference concluded, Newsome told a smaller group of reporters: "Nothing I said today will allow you to know what we're going to do at the draft because I said we might take a quarterback at 29." Subterfuge aside, it's more likely the Ravens will take an offensive lineman instead of a quarterback in the first round of next week's draft.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun reporter | February 23, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS -- When the Ravens selected guard Chris Chester in the second round of the NFL draft a year ago, the reasoning was a departure from the usual rationale for grabbing a big guy you expect to knock down other big guys. Rather than dwell on size and strength, the Ravens gushed over Chester's athleticism. A converted tight end, the 6-foot-3, 305-pound Chester was singled out for his quickness and agility. And his versatility. He projects as an eventual center. With the Ravens potentially seeking more offensive line help at the NFL scouting combine in anticipation of the April draft, it wouldn't be surprising if they wound up with another multitasking lineman.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Teammates call them "the trailer park," a nickname senior quarterback Brian Hampton said is a nod to the blue-collar image they project and the occasional mess they make in the Navy locker room. And that is pretty much all of the irreverence one will hear regarding the Midshipmen's offensive line, which once again is performing with exacting proficiency as the backbone of the program. Navy's signature is its run-heavy, spread option offense. Through their 5-1 start, the Mids are leading the nation in rushing offense and have produced a variety of playmakers, starting with Hampton and fullback Adam Ballard inside, and slotbacks Reggie Campbell and Shun White outside.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Diop Wallace says the pregame ritual starts tomorrow at the Golden Corral restaurant, where "The Big Dogs" will lead their Long Reach football teammates in a routine he calls "stuffing our faces." "Then after school on Friday, we'll go to my house, chill, watch television and eat some more," said Wallace, whose fourth-ranked Lightning visits Oakland Mills in Friday night's Howard County League opener. "We'll all get two 32-ounce Gatorades, and my dad, Donald, will cook chicken, maybe some pasta and garlic bread.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
One axiom about any NFL draft is that its overall quality and the ultimate winners and losers will not be known for three or four years. However, what can be said for this year's draft is the team that approached it with the greatest commitment toward the long term was the New York Jets, who selected two of the best available offensive linemen with their two first-round selections. While the weekend dramas revolved around the Houston Texans' decision to make defensive end Mario Williams the No. 1 pick over running back Reggie Bush and the three-way comparisons among the top quarterbacks, the Jets laid the foundation to be a consistent competitor in the AFC East.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2005
ATLANTA - In limited action, the Ravens' starting offensive line knocked around Atlanta Falcons defenders. In doing so with relative ease, the unit may have knocked out questions about its collective advanced age. The Ravens bullied the Falcons through the first 20 minutes of Saturday night's 16-3 NFL preseason loss, paving the way for backup running back Chester Taylor's 55 yards on eight carries. Four of the five linemen are at least 30, but you could not tell that against the Falcons.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
ASHBURN, Va. - There's a saying among the Washington Redskins offensive linemen that the best kind of attention is no attention at all. That's because while the quarterbacks, running backs and wide receivers are making the big plays, the offensive linemen are content to go unnoticed. This week, however, center Larry Moore, guards Randy Thomas and Dave Fiore, and tackles Jon Jansen and Chris Samuels have been in the spotlight after the unit was flagged for six false starts and seven overall penalties in a 27-25 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday.
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