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By Arthur Hirsch | January 3, 2010
Friends, family and law enforcement officials came in from the cold Saturday morning to share their grief, disbelief and recollections of 11-year-old Sarah Haley Foxwell, whose body was found in a wooded patch of northern Wicomico County on Christmas Day. As about 1,600 people filed into Emmanuel Wesleyan Church, two projection screens flanking the stage showed pictures taken of the blond, blue-eyed Sarah "Haleybugs" from the time she was an...
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NEWS
October 1, 2014
Michael Phelps was largely forgiven for driving drunk near Salisbury University in 2004 because he was 19 years old. The charge was reduced to driving impaired, his record ultimately wiped clean by the courts. Five years later when a photo of him inhaling from a water pipe commonly used to smoke marijuana hit the Internet, he apologized again, and that incident blew over quickly as well. But what happened early Tuesday morning outside the Fort McHenry Tunnel was different. The man who possesses the most Olympic medals of any athlete in history failed a Breathalyzer test.
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NEWS
February 26, 2010
A registered sex offender who failed to report that he had moved out of his home, as required by law, was being sought by Baltimore County police. Police released a statement Thursday saying they are looking for Christopher Andrew Parkinson, 24, who they say did not make it known that he was no longer living in the 200 block of Caraway Road in Reisterstown. His previous address was in the 12300 block of Bonfire Drive, also in Reisterstown. Police said Parkinson was convicted in September 2009 of a third-degree sex offense against a juvenile in a crime that occurred in Baltimore County in 2008.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Victims advocates are expressing dismay over a decision this week by Maryland's highest court that could lead to the removal of hundreds of names from a list of registered sex offenders in the state. The advocates say removing names from the registry could put women and children at greater risk by leaving families less able to identify potential predators in their midst. But critics of the list argue there's no evidence it has resulted in fewer sexual assaults or deterred offenders from committing such crimes.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
The General Assembly passed legislation in 2006 that requires the Maryland Parole Commission to enter into and sign extended sexual offender parole supervision agreements with sex offenders sentenced on or after August 1 of that year. The statute specifically states that this supervision starts once the term of confinement, parole supervision or mandatory supervision, whichever is latest, is completed. When an offender is determined to have violated the terms of their parole or mandatory release, the Parole Commission may revoke the supervision and require that person to serve the remaining portion of the sentence originally imposed by the court.
NEWS
By Sarah Tan | July 14, 2010
The Baltimore Sun The Harford County warrant apprehension unit arrested Anthony Eugene Robinson on Wednesday morning in connection with the rape of a 24-year-old Aberdeen woman July 11. Before being arrested, Robinson, 45, had three open District Court arrest warrants and one warrant for failure to appear in court. He had previous warrants for failing to register as a sex offender and for violating his parole. "He had two other open district court warrants, and we've been looking for him for some time.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | December 15, 2011
A convicted sex offender who was cleared by a jury of rape charges in September has been linked through DNA to two additional rapes, including a November rape of a woman in her Reservoir Hill home, court records show. Nelson Bernard Clifford, of the 800 block of Brooks Lane, was charged on Dec. 6 with raping a woman at knifepoint after breaking into her home while she was sleeping at about 9 p.m. on Nov. 12, according to charging documents. Police say he blindfolded her and bound her hands, and threatened to slash her face.
NEWS
July 7, 2011
How hypocritical of editorialists at The Sun — whose "Light For All" could easily be swapped for "If It Bleeds, It Leads" — for excoriating its audience in its editorial regarding public reaction to the July 4 t h violent incidents at the Inner Harbor ("Inner Harbor fireworks," July 6). A newspaper that pays its reporters to tweet in near real-time any and all crime they can uncover in Baltimore, and that allows, if not encourages, inflammatory and often bigoted commentary in its reader forums, and that periodically takes to publishing a body count box, has a sudden and newly-found perspective to admonish readers that things are not nearly as bad as they once were?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 13, 2012
A 36-year-old man from a tiny, unincorporated town in Western Maryland with two prior convictions for sexually abusing children has been sentenced to more than three decades in prison for advertising child pornography on the Internet. Matthew Sluss, of Rawlings, in Allegany County, will be on supervised release for the rest of his life once he serves his 33 year federal prison sentence, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. "Two prior convictions for sexually abusing children did not deter Matthew Sluss from using the Internet to contact other pedophiles and produce child pornography," Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 24, 2009
A massive search continued Thursday evening for an 11-year-old Salisbury girl who police say was kidnapped by a registered sex offender Tuesday night. Authorities have arrested and charged Thomas James Leggs, 30, a registered sex offender in two states, with burglary and kidnapping in the disappearance of Sarah Haley Foxwell, who was taken from her bedroom, authorities say. Police said Leggs is a former boyfriend of Sarah's aunt, who is the guardian of the missing girl and her younger sister.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One-fourth of the names on Maryland's sex offender registry could be removed after the state's top court expanded Monday on an earlier ruling that adding offenders from before the list was created violated the state constitution. The Court of Appeals declared last year that the state could not require the registration of people who committed their crimes before October 1995, when the database was established. State officials removed the one name in question in that case but maintained that federal law required them to keep older cases in the database.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
Being a native Philadelphian and currently a resident of eastern Baltimore County, I am anything but a Redskins fan. However, I cannot understand why anyone would be offended by the team's name ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). In fact, Native Americans should feel proud that a team, especially one based in the nation's capital, would honor the fighting spirit of Native Americans by naming itself after them. A football team seeks to win every time it takes the field.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 1, 2014
One of my earliest childhood memories is going door-to-door at the Kendale Apartments on Maiden Choice Lane in Arbutus with Mom. The purpose of the exercise was not to solicit contributions on behalf of a political candidate, however. Rather, Mom and a group of like-minded volunteers were organizing in opposition to a woman by the name of Madalyn Murray O'Hair - she of the [un]holy crusade to ban prayer from public schools. Given my tender years, little did I realize that the Ehrlichs were fully engaged in a culture war that continues to burn brightly five decades later.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 29, 2014
Bail was set at $50,000 Wednesday for a former Aberdeen area resident who is accused of failing to properly register as a sex offender. Brian Christopher Shumate, 46, was being held without bail at the Harford County Detention Center on three charges of allegedly failing to notify authorities of a change of address, failing to notify of a change of employer and failing to register as required for a tier III sexual offender, according to charging documents....
NEWS
May 7, 2014
Baltimore's new "Ban the Box" law does little to address employment discrimination against ex-offenders. In fact, the moniker "Ban the Box" itself is an epic public relations blunder. Even supporters of the initiative are forced to admit that the legislation doesn't in fact "ban" anything but simply postpones criminal history inquiries until later in the hiring process. In addition, both preliminary research and conventional wisdom indicate that "Ban the Box" legislation might actually contribute to ex-offender unemployment rates.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun and By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Federal authorities said Friday they are seeking a convicted sex offender who is at large in the Baltimore area. Steven Leon Mack, 33, escaped April 28 from a federal halfway house in the city and failed to contact the city's sex offender unit as ordered, according to Deputy U.S. Marshal David Lutz. Originally convicted in New York in 2003 of sexual misconduct with a victim younger than 17, Mack was convicted in 2011 on a federal charge of failure to register as a sex offender.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
A former Annapolis man, a convicted sex offender who is serving a 15-year sentence for burglary, has been charged with first-degree rape and related counts after his DNA was linked to a 1993 sexual assault in Annapolis, officials said. An Anne Arundel County judge unsealed the indictment of James Albert Henson, 47, this week. Henson is charged in the rape of a 21-year-old woman who was attacked Oct. 21, 1993, in her apartment in the 200 block of Victor Parkway. - Andrea F. Siegel
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 27, 2014
It swallowed people up. That's what it really did, if you want to know the truth. It swallowed them up whole, swallowed them up by the millions. In the process, it hollowed out communities, broke families, stranded hope. Politicians brayed that they were being "tough on crime" -- as if anyone is really in favor of crime -- as they imposed ever longer and more inflexible sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. But the "War on Drugs" didn't hurt drugs at all: Usage rose by 2,800 percent -- that's not a typo -- in the 40 years after it began in 1971.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
The U.S. Justice Department's announcement last week that it would seek clemency applications from thousands of federal prisoners was a major departure for an administration that has made minimal use of its powers to grant inmates early release. But the potential freeing of thousands of inmates is not completely unknown for the federal justice system — and advocates for shorter sentences say experience shows prisoners can be released without harming the public. Previous changes to sentencing rules have led to early release for tens of thousands of inmates serving time for crack convictions.
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