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By Tim Smith | November 26, 2000
The holiday music season will move into high gear as soon as Thanksgiving turkey leftovers hit the fridge. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra gets things started with a nicely offbeat program that includes Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Noels pour les instruments" and the world premiere of Ray Sprenkle's "Reflections on Titian's 'Assumption.' " Anne Harrigan will conduct the performances at 8 p.m. Friday and Dec. 6 and 2 p.m. Dec. 3 at St. Mary's Seminary Chapel, Roland Avenue and Northern Parkway.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
"Bat Boy: The Musical" may not be what one expects - there's not a baseball in sight - but it's still a must-see show in all aspects, captivating Colonial Players audiences since it opened in March. Set to a melodic pop-rock score, this tabloid tale - direct from Weekly World News - is set in a small West Virginia town where a half-human, half-bat mutant is found in a cave by the spelunking Taylor siblings, Ron, Rick and Ruthie. The tale unfolds as Bat Boy learns to behave most civilly toward towns folk - who respond less civilly toward him. The Colonial Players production of "Bat Boy" compares well to another renowned version of the show: the 2001 off-Broadway run at Union Square Theater, which captured several off-Broadway musical awards.
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FEATURES
By Barbara Shea and Barbara Shea,NEWSDAY | May 12, 1996
For almost 20 years, a bimonthly magazine called Transitions Abroad has been one of the best sources of information on affordable options for travelers who hate to be considered tourists. Each year, editor Clayton A. Hubbs also pulls the latest programs together in one volume: "Transitions Abroad Alternative Travel Directory," subtitled "The Complete Guide to Work, Study & Travel Overseas."The magazine is full of tips and comments from travelers themselves, and the latest issue also chronicles a batch of on-line leads.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
In seven minutes, Tim Kuhn will progress from first date to realizing he'll never be straight. And that terrifies him. As part of Monday night's Stoop Storytelling show at Center Stage, Kuhn will share with a crowd of strangers how he came to terms with being gay. As the show approached, he spent a considerable amount of time revisiting his breakthrough moment, practiced his monologue several times and now says he's more or less ready....
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 2005
From the assassinations of Malcolm X and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to an interactive retro prom, Baltimore theatergoers can look forward to the daring and different in 2005-2006. The ways in which stories are told on stage often will be as daring as the stories themselves. For example, in Israeli playwright Motti Lerner's The Murder of Isaac, Rabin's 1995 murder is reenacted by patients suffering from post-traumatic stress, as part of their therapy. The play will make its U.S. and English-language premiere at Center Stage Feb. 3-March 12. Center Stage will also treat its audiences to the mid-Atlantic premiere of August Wilson's Radio Golf (March 24-April 30)
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
Inside a cookie-cutter Columbia office building, next to the security guard's desk and around the corner from the post office, the gurgling sound of a bubbling brook spills out into the hall.Move closer and the warm hiss of an espresso machine can be heard. Laughter and the smell of lavender-scented aromatherapy candles linger in the air.In an age when coffee bars often reside in mammoth corporate bookstores, the Meeting Point cafe and bookstore looks, smells, sounds and tastes a bit like old-school Columbia, before it became just another glossy suburb.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 5, 2007
A series of wooden African masks hangs on the walls of a handsome colonial home in an unnamed country in Western Africa. The mouths and eyes are carved in formal expressions of horror and surprise. How fitting. If you go The Unmentionables runs at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. N.W. through Sept. 30. Show times: 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sundays. Tickets cost $32-$52. Call 202-393-3939 or go to woollymammoth.net.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2000
Ocean City isn't the only destination worth crossing the Bay for this summer. There's also the 15th annual Eastern Shore Chamber Music Festival, which runs the weekends of June 2-4 and 9-11. Artistic co-directors March Rosen, cellist Marcy Rosen of the Mendelssohn String Quartet and J. Lawrie Bloom, a clarinetist with the Chicago Symphony, have put together programs that offer opportunities to hear a good deal of offbeat fare. (If that isn't attraction enough, there's always the possibility of an Elian sighting.
TRAVEL
By JUNE SAWYERS | November 6, 2005
Eccentric California (Bradt/Globe Pequot Press; $19.95) Of course, many non-Californians consider California an eccentric place to begin with. And, in truth, eccentricity here is not the same as eccentricity in, say, Utah. The state is known for its cutting-edge social conventions, and, admittedly, many firsts originated in the Golden State (from motels to skateboards and drive-in churches). Clearly, author Jan Friedman has her work cut out for her, but she seems up to the challenge, discussing festivals and events, peculiar pursuits, museums and collections, "quirkyvilles" (towns with a twist)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | March 3, 2007
When you work as hard as I do, it's hard to keep up on all the best films, but I felt it was important to carve a couple of hours out of my extremely busy schedule to see Reno 911!: Miami, if only because of the obvious geographic link to the Grapefruit League. It's the cinematic version of the offbeat Cops spoof on Comedy Central, but it's a concept that's clearly better served in 30-minute increments. A half-hour in and I was ready for The Daily Show. I think I'll have better luck tonight with Wild Hogs.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Mount St. Mary's coach Tom Gravante admitted that he erred when he didn't give the players the day off after a road game against Virginia. The team followed up that 18-11 loss to the Cavaliers on Feb. 26 with a 13-5 setback to Towson on March 2. Since then, Gravante has adjusted his coaching philosophy, giving the Mountaineers (4-4) a day off after contests. The change appears to be working as the team followed a day off after 19-9 loss to Johns Hopkins on March 5 with a 16-7 rout of Manhattan last Saturday and then a day off after Manhattan with a 14-6 thumping of Georgetown this past Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Santa Claus and two of his elves pedaled their bicycles across Fort Avenue and up Woodall Street, stopping beside an apartment across from the Domino Sugar Factory. With Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You" blasting from a boombox — and a handful of curious neighbors looking on — the trio carefully unloaded their cargo: A six-and-a-half-foot Douglas fir and a pulled pork sandwich. Up the stairway they went. Christmas had officially arrived at Marilyn Agro's home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
A 12-foot-long white banner with black letters has been suction-cupped to the first-floor windows of the former Craig Flinner art gallery at Charles and Centre streets. It reads: "Future home of the Contemporary Museum . Opening January, 2012. " At least, that's the plan. In fact, the date for the grand reopening is something of a moving target. At the moment, Sue Spaid, the Contemporary's executive director, doesn't have a signed lease. The museum's furniture and most of its documents are in storage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A pub crawl is simple: Gather some friends, hit some bars and stumble your separate ways home. While fun, the routine can get a little repetitive. That's why, in the past couple years, a number of off-beat bar crawls have sprung up. Now, you and a gang of friends or family can pedal from pub to pub on a custom-made 16-person bicycle, or learn about the haunted bars of Ellicott City — and then hoist a pint inside. You can even cover yourself in fake blood and makeup, and shuffle like a zombie down Harford Road.
FEATURES
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Bob Gerber, owner of the Antique Man in Fells Point, devotes part of his storefront window to a jumble of religious keepsakes: A reclining Christ, four wood-carved saints, flowers, and signs. Not the most obvious way to lure people into a shop selling antiques, but then again, Gerber sees his religious window, at 1806 Fleet St., as something of a community service. "We have so many immigrants in the neighborhood, they stop by and say their prayers, at least 100 people a day," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 7, 2010
Within five minutes of meeting the Baltimore-area writer and performer Susan Mele, there are several interesting things you are likely to learn about her: In 1999, she was chosen as the official Nabisco Snacker for the state of California, based on a touching and profound monologue she composed about a Wheat Thin. That same year, she was a finalist on the Nickelodeon cable channel's contest for the funniest mom in America. (She and her husband have four children, all of whom, luckily, share their mother's penchant for wearing oversized elf hats in public places.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 4, 1999
The kooky, dark humor of playwright Nicky Silver may make him somewhat of an outsider among those who favor entertainment-for-entertainment's sake, but he's become a regular attraction at AXIS Theatre, where his comedy, "The Food Chain," opens tonight.AXIS has previously produced Silver's "Raised in Captivity" and "Pterodactyls." Now director Brian Klaas returns to Silver's offbeat world, which is as brimming as ever with neuroses and insecurities. Gina S. Braden, Bethany Brown, Patrick Martyn, Sean Rivers and Dennis U. Scott make up the cast.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT/RIDDER TRIBUNE | June 23, 2006
Banking on the success of two American remakes of Japanese films, The Ring and The Grudge, Hollywood has at least 16 more remakes of so-called J-Horror films in various stages of acquisition, production and release - a major gamble on a minor genre. During the late '90s, Asian cinema produced a bunch of deliciously surreal and creepy flicks, including Tomie (she's so lovable, you're compelled to kill her) and Phone, about the cell phone from hell. Even as the phenomenon is being promoted in Everytown, U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 7, 2010
Within five minutes of meeting the Baltimore-area writer and performer Susan Mele, there are several interesting things you are likely to learn about her: In 1999, she was chosen as the official Nabisco Snacker for the state of California, based on a touching and profound monologue she composed about a Wheat Thin. That same year, she was a finalist on the Nickelodeon cable channel's contest for the funniest mom in America. (She and her husband have four children, all of whom, luckily, share their mother's penchant for wearing oversized elf hats in public places.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
Ramin Bahrani's Goodbye Solo is the best in a stream of new independent movies, including Kelly Reichardt's Old Joy, that bring feature films the intimate focus and sneaky power of regionally flavored short stories - the sort you'd find in a first-class magazine such as Oxford American. It's intelligent and emotional, not studied or sappy. Bahrani wrings honest humor and meaning from a two-character tale. The movie is about farewells and flying solo. It's also about the mistake of treating a certain span of life as a bye week in a sports season.
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