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SPORTS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 5, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- A unified horse-racing industry proposed legislation yesterday that would permit establishment of up to four off-track betting parlors in Maryland, an idea immediately approved in concept by a joint legislative committee.Representatives of Maryland's two thoroughbred tracks and two harness tracks, as well as horse owners and breeders, the union that represents pari-mutuel clerks and track parking attendants, and even the company that manufactures the computers used in tallying wagers, agreed that off-track betting is the logical next step to increase the size of purses at Maryland tracks.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
The president of Maryland's major thoroughbred racetracks says his multi-million-dollar plan to rejuvenate racing can be accomplished with a mix of track money, state loans and a diversion from the winnings paid to bettors."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | September 10, 1997
The request by Bally's Maryland Inc., owner of the Ocean Downs harness track, to open an off-track betting center in Hagerstown remains the centerpiece of today's Maryland Racing Commission agenda -- despite Monday's statement by Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.Curran urged the commission to let the General Assembly decide the controversial issue of who can profit from simulcasting out-of-state thoroughbred races to Maryland bettors. The commissioners could abide by that and still rule on Bally's request, since Bally's is willing to open the OTB site and simulcast only harness races.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
MOUNT AIRY -- A town resident hopes to be one of the first to open an off-track betting parlor in Maryland and has targeted the Frederick area as a likely site.But C. William "Bill" Coleman said he foresees problems for himself and others who want to take advantage of a new state law that allows people to bet on horse races without going to the track.He said the law, which takes effect July 1, favors track owners because they must be involved in any negotiations to establish OTB parlors.Coleman, 48, an avid racing fan and owner of a Baltimore computer consulting company, said he and a business associate from Baltimore who coordinates trips to casinos have a group of people willing to invest $2 million in the project.
NEWS
August 6, 1992
A $30 million sports museum and entertainment complex has been proposed to fill the Power Plant building, the cavity in the wide smile that is Baltimore's Inner Harbor. It will have a "Wide World of Sports" display honoring veteran sportscaster and Baltimorean Jim McKay, sports clinics, memorabilia shows and "virtual reality" theaters in which spectators will get the sense of riding a bobsled or powerboat racing.The center wouldn't open for a couple of years, but already Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has inaugurated it with a maneuver no athlete could accomplish: playing both sides of the fence.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Gary Gately and Thomas W. Waldron and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | March 14, 1996
Hungry for additional tax dollars, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he now supports legalizing slot machine gambling at Maryland race tracks and off-track betting sites.However, Mr. Schmoke said his support of slots legislation pending in Annapolis is contingent on securing enough of the gambling profits for the city of Baltimore from $40 million to $75 million annually."If it can benefit us to the tune of 40 to 50 million dollars a year, then I'm going to support that legislation," he said.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Race tracks were bowing to inclement weather and closing everywhere Saturday morning, but Laurel Park never wavered.After track superintendent John Passero and his crew had labored on the racing strip all day, chief administrative officer Jim Mango decided quickly to open Laurel for business.As a result, the Maryland operation handled more than $3 million -- about $500,000 less than a normal Saturday -- and suffered only minimally after the winter's first snowfall.With simulcast partners Aqueduct, Philadelphia Park and Hawthorne (Chicago area)
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Two summers ago, the Timonium meeting at the state fair was sinking into a sea of red ink and questions arose about how long management could keep it going with the deficit mounting.Hello, simulcasting. The telecasting of the 10-day meet over the Maryland off-track betting network and the exporting of the Timonium signal out of state saved the day.This past summer, with more money available for purses, revenues improved even more, so much so that Timonium generated a $116,925 surplus."In 1994, we did so well with simulcasting that we got back all our overpayments for a couple of years and still had a $200,000 surplus," said Howard "Max" Mosner, general manager at Timonium.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Todd Pletcher knew there were rumors. He even figured some of them impugned his horses. When you're one of the winningest trainers in the game who just happens to condition a quarter of the Kentucky Derby field, that, he said, "is part of the deal. " Upon hearing the specific rumor concerning Verrazano, the 4-1 second choice on the morning line for Saturday's race, the man worrying about five Derby horses - plus four in the ultra-competitive Kentucky Oaks field Friday - found a reason to smile.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 26, 1992
Today's card at Pimlico Race Course might be remembered as the first "Muddy Million."The Maryland Million program has been blessed with good weather in its six previous runnings.But predictions that the Baltimore track would be doused last night with up to three inches of rain, the effects of tropical storm Danielle, caused trainers to rethink strategy and management to consult weather forecasters.Track operator Joe De Francis said that if therain tapers off by noon and the skies clear, the three turf races on the Maryland Million card will be run on the grass course.
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