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NEWS
February 12, 2007
Margaret K. Anders, the former postmaster of Oella and a longtime soup kitchen volunteer, died of pneumonia Feb. 5 at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 88. Born Margaret Kilduff, she was the eldest of 10 children of an Abingdon blacksmith. After graduating from St. Stephens High School in Bradshaw and Mount St. Agnes College in Baltimore, she married Cecil Trinkhaus, the Oella postmaster in 1941. Mrs. Anders became the assistant postmaster and, when her husband died, she took over as postmaster in Oella.
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NEWS
November 21, 2006
A portion of Oella Avenue in the Oella community near Catonsville that had been closed for more than a year could reopen next summer. Work had been delayed because a retaining wall was in danger of collapsing, and a bid to fix the road last year came in at more than $1.7 million, about $1 million higher than expected. James Arford, structural design chief for the Baltimore County Department of Public Works, said his office has approved a variation of the disputed contract so that work can begin in January at a cost of $1.1 million.
NEWS
By Nick Shields | November 14, 2006
THE PROBLEM -- Neighbors in the Oella community near Catonsville wonder why a section along Oella Avenue remains closed after more than a year. THE BACK STORY -- Residents report that the road's closure is an inconvenience for the neighborhood and adds to driving time and that the detour has created only confusion. They also are concerned that emergency vehicles might be delayed. James Arford, chief of the structural design section of the Baltimore County Department of Public Works, acknowledged that people are inconvenienced by the closure and said it's unfortunate that it has taken as long as it has to fix. He said that in July 2005 the county closed an area near the road to all traffic when a retaining wall along Oella Avenue near Pleasant Hill Road began to collapse.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2005
A developer with a history of converting old office and commercial space in Baltimore into luxury apartments is about to buy the historic Oella Mill near Ellicott City to try the same sort of transformation. David H. Hillman, chief executive officer of Virginia-based Southern Management Corp., is planning to turn the 200,000- square-foot building - used until recently by artists and antiques dealers - into about 170 residential units with interior parking. He expects to close on the $5.5 million deal in about a week and a half, and has workers there now cleaning out the inside of the mill.
NEWS
By Aparna Balakrishnan and Aparna Balakrishnan,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
It's easy to forget how close noisy and bustling U.S. 40 is as visitors drive along narrow roads, approaching the idyllic area encircling the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Oella. The park and museum sit on a small portion of 142 acres tucked in the woods near Old Frederick Road in the historic mill town established in 1808, two years after Banneker's death. Opened in June 1998, the museum celebrates Baltimore County native Banneker, an African-American who was a self-taught scientist.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
Parking will be prohibited on Main Street in Historic Ellicott City from 4 a.m. to noon tomorrow to allow street cleaning by the county's Department of Public Works. Three of the district's six parking lots, the Oella lot, the lot behind the post office and the lot behind the old firehouse off Ellicott Mills Road, will remain open during the cleaning. Information: Department of Public Works customer service division, 410-313-4400.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
The Baltimore County Council approved two bills last night that will enable the conversion of a 19th-century mill in Oella to luxury apartments. The unanimous vote came after 18 months of protests from a group of Oella residents who worry that the 175 apartments planned for the mill on the Patapsco River will snarl traffic on the community's narrow, twisting streets. The $26 million renovation project was proposed by Forest City Residential Group of Cleveland. But Council Chairman Stephen G. Samuel Moxley, who introduced the bills, said that without the measures -- which will exempt historic structures from some open space and parking requirements -- the mill could have been turned into a catering hall or restaurant.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
In a debate that could determine how historic buildings are redeveloped across Baltimore County, Oella residents argued yesterday the merits of two bills that would allow a 19th-century mill to be converted into luxury apartments. More than a dozen residents appeared at a County Council work session to speak in favor of the bills, which would exempt historic buildings from some open space and parking requirements. Without the bills and the redevelopment of Oella Mill, they said, the historic centerpiece of their community would eventually crumble.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Harry S. Dickey Jr., a former official of his family's Oella woolen mill, died Jan. 18 of Alzheimer's disease in a Greenville, S.C., nursing home. The former Ruxton resident was 80. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he attended McDonogh School and graduated from Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, Pa. He served in the Pacific with the Marine Corps in World War II and later graduated from Lowell Textile Institute. He went to work for W.J. Dickey & Sons Inc. woolen manufacturers in Oella.
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