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NEWS
February 16, 2010
Carroll County officials have put together a committee to hear a dispute between the proprietors of an organic farm and neighbors who say it smells bad, according to a report in the Carroll County Times. Phil and Victoria Snader are the owners of Enviro-Organic Technologies Inc. in Marston. They take natural materials from food processing plants - including spice waste from McCormick and residuals from slaughterhouses - and give them to farmers as an alternative to commercial fertilizers.
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NEWS
By Kathy Hudson | July 11, 2013
The summer birthday season in our family began with my husband's birthday, just before July Fourth. He never enjoys celebrating his birthday, but he likes cake and plenty of it. This year I ordered one with fudge icing, as he had enjoyed a friend's fudge cake this spring. I requested a big, 10-inch cake, so he would have plenty to enjoy in the days after. He offered to go with me to pick it up; he pictured me dropping it before it came home. When he lifted it from our car, I saw him put his nose to the box. He likes paper and is fond of smelling pages of books.
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NEWS
June 12, 2012
This big, deep, dark, mystery being investigated by the Baltimore City Department of Public Works and the Maryland Department of the Environment is more of the city's (and state's) cover-up of deplorable conditions at the Inner Harbor. Kimberly Burgess, the city's director of surface water management, won't confirm or rule out a sewage spill or leak. Meanwhile, a spokesman for the Department of the Environment discounts the odor complaints as likely a continuation of the algae bloom that generated noxious smells and killed fish in the harbor.
NEWS
By Jim Joyner, The Baltimore Sun and By Jim Joyner, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Anne Arundel County Fire Department officials said a Freon leak Tuesday morning at the Trader Joe's in Annapolis sent two people to the hospital and caused an evacuation of the store. Two hours later, though, the store in the 100 block of Jennifer Road was deemed safe and was reopened, according to fire officials. The incident was reported at about 10:45 a.m., according to fire department Division Chief Kevin Swindle. He said the first unit on the scene found three people suffering respiratory trouble, attributed to an “irritating odor,” he said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Frank Marion used to light candles to mask the odor. Marion, who owns a home about 300 feet from the Millersville landfill, has complained since 2008 about the smell of rotten eggs permeating his home on an almost-daily basis. Now, Marion and other neighbors say the odor has gotten progressively worse - stronger and more frequent - and is causing nausea, vomiting and headaches among some residents. "It has totally destroyed my life," Marion said. Last week, about a dozen of the residents met to discuss remedies: They are requesting that Anne Arundel County appoint a third party to monitor emissions from the landfill and to test the air and well water to determine if there are any contaminants.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
The Maryland Emergency Management Agency and Baltimore officials are monitoring a chemical leak that may result in a noticeable gas-like odor across the Baltimore region sometime Wednesday afternoon, officials announced Wednesday afternoon. The leak of the chemical methyl mercaptan, a common additive to natural gas, occurred in West Virginia and the odor has already reached Frederick, Prince George's and Montgomery counties, city officials said. Despite the odor, there are no known health risks, city officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The environmental group Blue Water Baltimore is investigating what it believes is a sewage spill at the Inner Harbor near the Domino Sugar Plant. David Flores, the water quality manager for the group's Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper program, said he inspected the area near Key Highway on his boat on Monday afternoon and believes, based on the odor and grayish appearance of the water, that a quarter-mile sewage discharge is stretching throughout the...
NEWS
October 11, 1995
Firefighters from Carroll and Baltimore counties investigated an odor in a two-car, two-story garage in the 5100 block of Hoffmanville Road near Alesia Monday night.Units from Lineboro and Manchester responded to the initial call at at 7:31 p.m. Lineboro firefighters noticed an unusual odor upon arrival, but were unable to identify the smell even with a four-gas monitoring instrument.The Baltimore County hazardous materials unit, based in Brooklandville, was not able to determine the cause of the odor with its monitors.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
An AirTran Airways plane was diverted to Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday as a precaution after the captain noticed an "unusual odor," the airline reported. Five crew members and 53 passengers were aboard Flight 753, which took off from Philadelphia at 3:46 p.m. and was headed to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. A maintenance crew based in Baltimore, where AirTran also provides service, was not immediately able to say what caused the odor in the Boeing 717. Pilots cleared the air, using the plane's air-conditioning system, a spokesman said.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
IT DOESN'T come close to reaching the level of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, but farmers in Maryland, as well as those in other parts of the country, have been fighting with their neighbors across the fence over manure -- specifically its smell -- for as long as anyone can remember. "It happens every year," Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley said during a cell-phone interview one day last week as he was spreading chicken manure over grain fields at his farm near Parsonsburg in Wicomico County.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Baltimore County police and fire crews responded Monday to a report of potentially hazardous materials in a rowhouse in the Parkville-Hillendale area. Officer Shawn Vinson, a spokesman for the police department, said that shortly after 5 p.m. officers began investigating a 911 report of a strong odor coming from the basement of a residence in the 8300 block of Ridgely Oak Road. Vinson said the county's bomb squad was called to the scene as a precaution. The incident was largely concluded by 8:30 p.m., with no one injured and no property damaged, according to Vinson and Capt.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
This big, deep, dark, mystery being investigated by the Baltimore City Department of Public Works and the Maryland Department of the Environment is more of the city's (and state's) cover-up of deplorable conditions at the Inner Harbor. Kimberly Burgess, the city's director of surface water management, won't confirm or rule out a sewage spill or leak. Meanwhile, a spokesman for the Department of the Environment discounts the odor complaints as likely a continuation of the algae bloom that generated noxious smells and killed fish in the harbor.
NEWS
June 7, 2012
The Sun got it right in its recent editorial entitled "Dollars and scents," (June 1) discussing the economic impact of the declining health of our harbor and our bay. As algal blooms and resulting fish kills happen year after year, citizens and regulators start to think that it's a normal phenomenon, caused only by high temperatures and extreme weather events. But we cannot pretend that this is normal, particularly when the science presents an urgent situation. Once the recent algal bloom began, the water samples taken in the harbor showed an increase in levels of chlorophyll and nutrients.
NEWS
June 6, 2012
Some of the new nutrient management regulations proposed by the Maryland Department of Agriculture to the Joint Committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review of the General Assembly are unworkable in many areas of the state and demonstrate an ignorance of current agronomic science. One new regulation requires that all applications of organic nutrients be incorporated into the soil within 48 hours while completely ignoring commercial fertilizers. There are several problems with this.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The environmental group Blue Water Baltimore is investigating what it believes is a sewage spill at the Inner Harbor near the Domino Sugar Plant. David Flores, the water quality manager for the group's Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper program, said he inspected the area near Key Highway on his boat on Monday afternoon and believes, based on the odor and grayish appearance of the water, that a quarter-mile sewage discharge is stretching throughout the...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
Officials at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport shut down two concourses for about an hour Monday morning, while investigators tried to determine the nature and source of an unusual odor. All checkpoints reopened by 10 a.m., after investigators removed what they believe was a can of pepper spray from a trash bin. Investigators discovered the item, which they are still processing, discarded in a trash can near the security check point at Concourse B. A passenger may have tossed the aerosol can before going through security, officials said.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
Officials at the Anne Arundel County Detention Center closed an office Tuesday after employees complained of a noxious odor.The office, which was in the classification department on the lower level of the detention center just outside Annapolis, was closed until an air quality expert can assess the situation tomorrow, Superintendent Richard Baker said."
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
A teacher and 25 fourth-graders at Owings Mills Elementary School were sent to area hospitals for evaluation after complaining yesterday of a noxious odor in their portable classroom.According to Principal Chet Scott, the teacher and students were expected to be released by yesterday afternoon. But county workers trained in handling hazardous materials had not located the odor's source and planned to test the classroom today.School officials summoned ambulances about 10:15 a.m. after students complained of a vinegar-like smell that caused coughing and headaches, said Baltimore County Battalion Chief Patrick T. Kelly.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 6, 2012
Three adults were taken to the hospital Tuesday morning after being overcome by chemical fumes at St. Margaret School in Bel Air, Harford County emergency officials said. No children were injured. A chemical odor in the building was reported at 8:30 a.m. Harford County's hazardous materials team and Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company responded and evacuated the building at 205 Hickory Ave., Rich Gardiner, a spokesman for Harford County Volunteer Fire and EMS Association, said. Three faculty members feeling ill from the odor were taken to Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air, while three other adults at the scene refused treatment.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 27, 2012
Emergency operations officials in Harford County said persistent calls received about gas odors from numerous locations in the county early Friday morning appear to be related to fumes from an oil refinery in New Jersey. No sources of gas were found in the county, but local fire companies were busy throughout Friday morning and into the early afternoon responding to calls of gas odors or suspected gas leaks. Harford Emergency Operations spokesman Rick Ayers said early Friday morning the county was informed by state emergency operations officials that fumes from an industrial facility in New Jersey had been detected in the air in Harford and Cecil counties and in New Castle County, Del. In a later statement, the county government said the fumes were from an oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., which is on the New Jersey shore of the Delaware River and across the river from Philadelphia International Airport.
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