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Odetta

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By Cox News Service | February 13, 1991
The distinctive voice of Odetta has graced many a stage in her 47 years of entertaining. But the folk singer/actress/civil rights activist -- who performs Sunday at the University of Maryland at Baltimore -- feels that the best is yet to come."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Just below the resonant layers of pain and anguish, hope warmed the mighty voice of Odetta. No matter the song - a century-old spiritual, a lowdown blues number, a mournful folk tune - the Alabama legend used a palette of emotions when she sang. Though the shades were often dark, she still managed to transport and buoy the listener. The world of pop may have never made a place for her. But Odetta, with her regal bearing and natural hairstyle worn years before it became a politically driven fashion statement, was never a coy pop darling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Just below the resonant layers of pain and anguish, hope warmed the mighty voice of Odetta. No matter the song - a century-old spiritual, a lowdown blues number, a mournful folk tune - the Alabama legend used a palette of emotions when she sang. Though the shades were often dark, she still managed to transport and buoy the listener. The world of pop may have never made a place for her. But Odetta, with her regal bearing and natural hairstyle worn years before it became a politically driven fashion statement, was never a coy pop darling.
NEWS
December 4, 2008
Every great social movement creates its own musical score. So it was with the American civil rights movement and Odetta, the honey-voiced songstress and musical conscience of that era who died this week at the age of 77. Odetta was a force of nature who drew from every strand of America's folk music tradition - prison ditties and work songs, Irish ballads and gospel tunes, spirituals and the blues. Her art and her voice embodied the rage, courage, defiance and hope of the terrific moral struggle that transformed America in the 1960s.
FEATURES
By Geoff Edgers and Geoff Edgers,BOSTON GLOBE | December 9, 2002
Odetta is 71 now, a half-century removed from the '60s folk scene. She is no longer the girl with a guitar who believes her deep, melancholy voice can change the world. "That was the biggest disappointment in my life, when I finally figured out there was nothing I could do," she says. She was born Odetta Gordon in Birmingham, Ala. At 6, her family moved to Los Angeles, where she took singing lessons and, by her 19th birthday, landed a role in a production of Finian's Rainbow. In the next few years, she would drop her last name and capture the attention of Pete Seeger and Harry Belafonte.
NEWS
December 4, 2008
Every great social movement creates its own musical score. So it was with the American civil rights movement and Odetta, the honey-voiced songstress and musical conscience of that era who died this week at the age of 77. Odetta was a force of nature who drew from every strand of America's folk music tradition - prison ditties and work songs, Irish ballads and gospel tunes, spirituals and the blues. Her art and her voice embodied the rage, courage, defiance and hope of the terrific moral struggle that transformed America in the 1960s.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
Folk music healed Odetta. It gave her a means of expression. And, like an old-time troubadour, she has carried her healing music around the world."I've had people come to me and thank me for healing them," she says on the phone from her New York apartment. "It wasn't me that did the healing. It was the song."She can't explain the magic in music. But she knows that the words, the stories, the melodies touch some universal place deep inside each of us. This is why old songs from another time endure, she says.
NEWS
March 11, 1991
IF THE GOVERNORSHIP is such a splendid misery to the fellow who once reveled in the marvels of mayoral office, let us suggest a solution: The presidency or, as a booby prize, the vice presidency.Once either nomination is secured, the fellow could stop having to battle with budget deficits, obstreperous legislators, ungrateful constituents and parochial journalists. He could turn his duties over to his lieutenant governor and travel the country, giving Americans everywhere the benefit of his shrewd and experienced insight into what makes the country tick and how it can be made to tick better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
"Imani All Mine," by Connie Porter. Houghton Mifflin. 212 pages. $23.One difference between life and art is that the latter attempts to comprehend the former. "Imani All Mine," the second "adult" novel by Connie Porter, who also wrote the immensely successful Addy series for adolescents, blurs that distinction.Yes, "Imani All Mine" catches the environment and especially the voice of 15-year-old Tasha Dawson, who lives with her mother and infant daughter Imani in a Buffalo slum. Theirs is a world of drugs and sudden violence, a world without fathers and where the mothers sell their food stamps for 50 cents on the dollar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
The Fixx is in England's The Fixx, the new-wave rockers whose hits went platinum in the '80s, are back and on tour Sunday at the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis. Expect a blend of the band's classic hits, such as "One Thing Leads To Another," and some new rock music. The music starts at 7 p.m. at the Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. Tickets are $32-$35. Call 410-268-4545. Bass master Grammy Award-winner Victor Wooten is bringing his electric bass to the Funk Box on Tuesday and Wednesday The bass player and composer will play his popular rhythm and blues and jazz hits from the past and new music from his album (Soul Circus)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
The Fixx is in England's The Fixx, the new-wave rockers whose hits went platinum in the '80s, are back and on tour Sunday at the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis. Expect a blend of the band's classic hits, such as "One Thing Leads To Another," and some new rock music. The music starts at 7 p.m. at the Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. Tickets are $32-$35. Call 410-268-4545. Bass master Grammy Award-winner Victor Wooten is bringing his electric bass to the Funk Box on Tuesday and Wednesday The bass player and composer will play his popular rhythm and blues and jazz hits from the past and new music from his album (Soul Circus)
FEATURES
By Geoff Edgers and Geoff Edgers,BOSTON GLOBE | December 9, 2002
Odetta is 71 now, a half-century removed from the '60s folk scene. She is no longer the girl with a guitar who believes her deep, melancholy voice can change the world. "That was the biggest disappointment in my life, when I finally figured out there was nothing I could do," she says. She was born Odetta Gordon in Birmingham, Ala. At 6, her family moved to Los Angeles, where she took singing lessons and, by her 19th birthday, landed a role in a production of Finian's Rainbow. In the next few years, she would drop her last name and capture the attention of Pete Seeger and Harry Belafonte.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
"Imani All Mine," by Connie Porter. Houghton Mifflin. 212 pages. $23.One difference between life and art is that the latter attempts to comprehend the former. "Imani All Mine," the second "adult" novel by Connie Porter, who also wrote the immensely successful Addy series for adolescents, blurs that distinction.Yes, "Imani All Mine" catches the environment and especially the voice of 15-year-old Tasha Dawson, who lives with her mother and infant daughter Imani in a Buffalo slum. Theirs is a world of drugs and sudden violence, a world without fathers and where the mothers sell their food stamps for 50 cents on the dollar.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
Folk music healed Odetta. It gave her a means of expression. And, like an old-time troubadour, she has carried her healing music around the world."I've had people come to me and thank me for healing them," she says on the phone from her New York apartment. "It wasn't me that did the healing. It was the song."She can't explain the magic in music. But she knows that the words, the stories, the melodies touch some universal place deep inside each of us. This is why old songs from another time endure, she says.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 21, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* For viewers of a certain age and social conscience, any mention of folk singer Odetta offers a mental time machine back to the 1960s.How nice, then, that she performs as a featured guest in "Songs of Freedom," a PBS Black History Month special airing tonight on Maryland Public Television (at 9 o'clock).The latest "Evening at Pops," with conductor John Williams and the Boston Pops Orchestra, the program celebrates inspiring photographs, poetry and music from the Civil War to the civil rights era.Other artists include actor Roscoe Lee Browne, soprano Shirley Verrett and the Boys Choir of Harlem.
NEWS
March 11, 1991
IF THE GOVERNORSHIP is such a splendid misery to the fellow who once reveled in the marvels of mayoral office, let us suggest a solution: The presidency or, as a booby prize, the vice presidency.Once either nomination is secured, the fellow could stop having to battle with budget deficits, obstreperous legislators, ungrateful constituents and parochial journalists. He could turn his duties over to his lieutenant governor and travel the country, giving Americans everywhere the benefit of his shrewd and experienced insight into what makes the country tick and how it can be made to tick better.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 21, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* For viewers of a certain age and social conscience, any mention of folk singer Odetta offers a mental time machine back to the 1960s.How nice, then, that she performs as a featured guest in "Songs of Freedom," a PBS Black History Month special airing tonight on Maryland Public Television (at 9 o'clock).The latest "Evening at Pops," with conductor John Williams and the Boston Pops Orchestra, the program celebrates inspiring photographs, poetry and music from the Civil War to the civil rights era.Other artists include actor Roscoe Lee Browne, soprano Shirley Verrett and the Boys Choir of Harlem.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
GEORGE MORRIS Satellite radio classic rock host George Taylor Morris, formerly the daily morning host on XM Satellite Radio's "Deep Tracks" classic rock channel and the primary host of the company's interview program, "XM Artist Confidential," died Saturday of throat cancer at his home in Reston, Va. He was 62. Morris, also known as GTM, had been a disc jockey and radio personality at stations on Long Island and in Boston, New York and elsewhere when...
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | February 13, 1991
The distinctive voice of Odetta has graced many a stage in her 47 years of entertaining. But the folk singer/actress/civil rights activist -- who performs Sunday at the University of Maryland at Baltimore -- feels that the best is yet to come."
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