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NEWS
February 17, 1991
Services for Frank M. Long, a retired accountant, will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at Hartley Miller Funeral Homes, 7527 Harford Road in Parkville.Mr. Long, who was born in a row house on Sharp Street in South Baltimore, died Thursday at his Northeast Baltimore apartment after a brief illness. He was 101.He attended public schools until the eighth grade, when he left school to help out in the family's business. Mr. Long later went back to school and was a graduate of Strayer Business College.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Loni Ingraham | May 15, 2014
Today the Towson Library is an impressive three-story brick and concrete bastion of literacy with a tower-like rotunda, a faux dragon in a faux fish pond, and enough space to accommodate the administrative offices of the Baltimore County Public Library system. The library chalked up 475,495 visits during the last fiscal year. It remains one of the busiest branches in the BCPL system. But in 1936 its beginning was less than propitious. The first borrower was a gentleman who took out a book on taxidermy, according to a history written by Corky Ives, branch manager from 1980 to 1998.
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EXPLORE
December 14, 2011
The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, North Point Lodge 4, thanks the crew of Baltimore County Firehouse 5 and their community for their continuous support in collecting donations for our Marine Mail Project. Over the last four years, the Halethorpe community has enabled the IOOF to send out approximately 3,000 care boxes to frontline soldiers in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Firehouse 5 has single-handedly allowed us to mail our soldiers approximate 200 care boxes every quarter.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Two Essex businesses were robbed in separate incidents last week in which the suspects either threatened employees with a gun, or implied a weapon At around 11 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, a suspect armed with a long-barreled revolver struck a cashier in the head with the gun at a BP gas station in the 200 block of Eastern Boulevard and demanded money from the registers, according to a Baltimore County police report. The robber collected an undisclosed amount of money and fled the scene.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Tucked between storefronts in the middle of Towson, a glass door marked "Odd Fellows Temple, Towson Lodge No. 79" leads to a narrow staircase. At the top, a heavy door with a peephole opens to a hall where throne-like chairs face an altar. In a back room, a skeleton lies in a casket. Generations have met in this stone building to plan good works or hold mystic ceremonies. They were brothers in a secret society, founded in the Old World but, in America, first chartered in Baltimore.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
Wallace S. Brooks Jr., a well-known Baltimore area funeral director, died of a heart attack Feb. 15 at his Cockeysville home. He was 61. Mr. Brooks was born and raised in Cambridge. After graduating from Cambridge High School in 1959, he worked at a local furniture store and at Eastern Shore State Hospital. Moving to Baltimore in 1963, he served an apprenticeship at William J. Tickner & Sons at North and Pennsylvania avenues. He studied for two years at the Cincinnati College of Embalming, graduating in 1965.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Charles H. Klaus Sr., a retired stationary engineer and lifelong Woodlawn resident, died Tuesday of a staph infection at his home. He was 96. Mr. Klaus was born in Baltimore and spent the remainder of his life in Woodlawn. "He lived in a house on Dogwood Road that was later torn down in the 1960s to make way for Martin's West," said his daughter, Cassie A. Klaus-Maye of Williamsburg, Va. Mr. Klaus attended Woodlawn Elementary School until the fifth grade, when he left to help support his family.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Two Essex businesses were robbed in separate incidents last week in which the suspects either threatened employees with a gun, or implied a weapon At around 11 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, a suspect armed with a long-barreled revolver struck a cashier in the head with the gun at a BP gas station in the 200 block of Eastern Boulevard and demanded money from the registers, according to a Baltimore County police report. The robber collected an undisclosed amount of money and fled the scene.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Yet another downtown commercial building is being converted to apartments. The red-brick building at 300 Cathedral St., known as Odd Fellows Hall, is currently being refurbished by a Washington-based developer, Broadwater Capital LLC, the Downtown Partnership said in a statement Monday. The building will contain 59 market-rate apartments and will begin leasing next summer, the partnership said. It is situated between West Pleasant and West Saratoga streets. “There continues to be a significant demand for professionals to move closer to their work and 300 Cathedral's proximity to Baltimore's City Center, Mount Vernon and the Westside provides tenants a Class-A living space that is within walking distance to major businesses, the Inner Harbor, Medical Centers and local restaurants,”  said Ahmad Hajj, a principal with Broadwater Capital, in the partnership's statement . Broadwater purchased the 72,000 square foot building in September for $1.1 million, according to state tax records.
NEWS
Loni Ingraham | May 15, 2014
Today the Towson Library is an impressive three-story brick and concrete bastion of literacy with a tower-like rotunda, a faux dragon in a faux fish pond, and enough space to accommodate the administrative offices of the Baltimore County Public Library system. The library chalked up 475,495 visits during the last fiscal year. It remains one of the busiest branches in the BCPL system. But in 1936 its beginning was less than propitious. The first borrower was a gentleman who took out a book on taxidermy, according to a history written by Corky Ives, branch manager from 1980 to 1998.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Yet another downtown commercial building is being converted to apartments. The red-brick building at 300 Cathedral St., known as Odd Fellows Hall, is currently being refurbished by a Washington-based developer, Broadwater Capital LLC, the Downtown Partnership said in a statement Monday. The building will contain 59 market-rate apartments and will begin leasing next summer, the partnership said. It is situated between West Pleasant and West Saratoga streets. “There continues to be a significant demand for professionals to move closer to their work and 300 Cathedral's proximity to Baltimore's City Center, Mount Vernon and the Westside provides tenants a Class-A living space that is within walking distance to major businesses, the Inner Harbor, Medical Centers and local restaurants,”  said Ahmad Hajj, a principal with Broadwater Capital, in the partnership's statement . Broadwater purchased the 72,000 square foot building in September for $1.1 million, according to state tax records.
EXPLORE
December 14, 2011
The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, North Point Lodge 4, thanks the crew of Baltimore County Firehouse 5 and their community for their continuous support in collecting donations for our Marine Mail Project. Over the last four years, the Halethorpe community has enabled the IOOF to send out approximately 3,000 care boxes to frontline soldiers in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Firehouse 5 has single-handedly allowed us to mail our soldiers approximate 200 care boxes every quarter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Charles H. Klaus Sr., a retired stationary engineer and lifelong Woodlawn resident, died Tuesday of a staph infection at his home. He was 96. Mr. Klaus was born in Baltimore and spent the remainder of his life in Woodlawn. "He lived in a house on Dogwood Road that was later torn down in the 1960s to make way for Martin's West," said his daughter, Cassie A. Klaus-Maye of Williamsburg, Va. Mr. Klaus attended Woodlawn Elementary School until the fifth grade, when he left to help support his family.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Tucked between storefronts in the middle of Towson, a glass door marked "Odd Fellows Temple, Towson Lodge No. 79" leads to a narrow staircase. At the top, a heavy door with a peephole opens to a hall where throne-like chairs face an altar. In a back room, a skeleton lies in a casket. Generations have met in this stone building to plan good works or hold mystic ceremonies. They were brothers in a secret society, founded in the Old World but, in America, first chartered in Baltimore.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
Wallace S. Brooks Jr., a well-known Baltimore area funeral director, died of a heart attack Feb. 15 at his Cockeysville home. He was 61. Mr. Brooks was born and raised in Cambridge. After graduating from Cambridge High School in 1959, he worked at a local furniture store and at Eastern Shore State Hospital. Moving to Baltimore in 1963, he served an apprenticeship at William J. Tickner & Sons at North and Pennsylvania avenues. He studied for two years at the Cincinnati College of Embalming, graduating in 1965.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
You will find them everywhere, huddled over tally sheets, weekly memos, newspapers, computers with on-line updates: Grown men and women arguing the prospects of Pepperdine, Campbell, Robert Morris, and other geographically obscure institutions.This is the time of year when the nation's office workers come together in a spasm of NCAA college basketball unity.Never mind that the Maryland criminal code clearly states that any sports bet is out of legal bounds. Those who know say NCAA betting pools are rampant in law firms, financial establishments, restaurants, media companies, (The Baltimore Sun included)
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
You will find them everywhere, huddled over tally sheets, weekly memos, newspapers, computers with on-line updates: Grown men and women arguing the prospects of Pepperdine, Campbell, Robert Morris, and other geographically obscure institutions.This is the time of year when the nation's office workers come together in a spasm of NCAA college basketball unity.Never mind that the Maryland criminal code clearly states that any sports bet is out of legal bounds. Those who know say NCAA betting pools are rampant in law firms, financial establishments, restaurants, media companies, (The Baltimore Sun included)
NEWS
February 17, 1991
Services for Frank M. Long, a retired accountant, will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at Hartley Miller Funeral Homes, 7527 Harford Road in Parkville.Mr. Long, who was born in a row house on Sharp Street in South Baltimore, died Thursday at his Northeast Baltimore apartment after a brief illness. He was 101.He attended public schools until the eighth grade, when he left school to help out in the family's business. Mr. Long later went back to school and was a graduate of Strayer Business College.
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