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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 22, 1991
BETHLEHEM, Occupied West Bank -- Israel is moving to prevent thousands of Palestinians from returning to their jobs in Israel when the wartime curfews on the occupied territories end.Authorities have begun enforcing a strict work-permit system that observers say will deny access to jobs of at least half of the 110,000 Palestinians who work in Israel.The system could be devastating to the economies of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, where paychecks from Israeli employers provided about 40 percent of the income before the Persian Gulf war began.
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NEWS
May 24, 2011
Perhaps you are right that peace negotiations based on Israel's pre-1967 boundaries, though perhaps arbitrary, are basically "what has to happen" to end the Israel-Palestine conflict ("Obama and the Arab Spring," May 19). But you should firmly tell our president that in order to demonstrate his moral leadership and credibility, he should have the U.S. first pull back from all its occupied territories. First, the territories won in World War II: Guam, Wake Island, the Marianna Islands and Midway Island.
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NEWS
By James Ron | August 15, 2000
YOU COULD say the Camp David talks failed because of divisions over Jerusalem, refugees, or water, but the real reason is that neither side prepared its constituents for peace. This is especially true for Israel, which holds most of the cards. Israel's political leaders must take the plunge and courageously admit, "We took their land, and now we must give it back." Most Israeli Jews sense the occupied territories are not really theirs, but they have never been told so by their own leaders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 2006
JERUSALEM --In an important and controversial ruling, the Israeli Supreme Court threw out part of a law yesterday that prevented Palestinians from seeking compensation from Israel for damage from Israeli army activities in the occupied territories. The ruling, which was unanimous, opens the way for Palestinians harmed in "nonbelligerent" army operations in the West Bank or Gaza to seek redress for damage. But the court left standing a provision that bars compensation to Palestinians harmed in combat operations.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman and Thomas L. Friedman,New York Times News Service | September 18, 1991
CAIRO, Egypt -- Israel and the United States failed to reach a compromise yesterday on the explosive loan guarantee issue, and within hours after their talks the Bush administration signaled it would refuse to provide the requested help unless Israel agreed to a freeze on future settlements in the occupied territories.Failing such a promise, a senior U.S. official said that Secretary of State James A. Baker III would recommend that President Bush take the fight directly to the American people with a nationwide campaign, including a possible Oval Office televised address, "If that is what it takes, because it is their tax dollars that would be supporting settlement activity, which we used to characterize as illegal and which we now moderately characterize as an obstacle to peace."
NEWS
By New York Times | November 2, 1990
UNITED NATIONS -- Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar is proposing that the Security Council involve itself directly in a search for a way to protect Palestinians in the Israeli-occupied territories.The proposal, made yesterday in a report prepared by Perez de Cuellar listing Palestinian accusations of Israeli mistreatment in the occupied territories, puts the United States in a serious quandary.Washington will have to decide either to support action against its longtime ally, Israel, which rejects any United Nations involvement in the occupied territories, or block any council action and thus risk endangering the solidarity of the anti-Iraq coalition it has assembled since Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2.Given the sensitivity of the issue, neither the United States mission nor the State Department made any immediate comment on the report.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | February 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- American restrictions on $400 million in U.S. loan guarantees to Israel last year had no impact on Israeli settlement policy, congressional investigators have found.While the aid stipulated that it not be used in the occupied territories, where Israel is aggressively encouraging a controversial buildup, it freed other funds that Israel could use there, congressional investigators found.The General Accounting Office study, released yesterday, bolstered the view of administration officials and some members of Congress that U.S. restrictions on future loan guarantees won't be sufficient to curb settlements, which the United States calls an obstacle to peace.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States accused Palestinians yesterday of being more interested in media posturing than negotiations and warned Arabs not to try to manipulate the peace process to affect Israeli elections.A senior U.S. official, voicing impatience with the unproductive latest round of peace talks, said the time had come for all the parties to move beyond "maximalist" opening positions and search for commonground. But he singled out the Palestinians for especially harsh criticism, saying they "need to do more negotiating than posturing."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 4, 1991
RABAT, Morocco -- Secretary of State James A. Baker IIIurged King Hassan II yesterday to join a Middle East peace conference as an observer and to use his influence with Palestinian leaders to persuade them not to block it.The king withheld a decision on whether to join the conference, to send an observer or to involve Morocco in multilateral talks with Israel, saying that he needed to consult other Arab leaders first.He also gave no direct answer on the request that he use his influence with the Palestinians, instead asking a series of factual questions, a senior State Department official said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 29, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres has renewed, in the most forthcoming terms yet, his country's offer to the Palestinians of virtual self-government on the West Bank and in the Gaza Strip as soon as the basis for overall autonomy for the occupied territories is agreed.As Mr. Peres outlined it yesterday, the Palestinians would take over the administration of the Gaza Strip almost immediately and assume control of most government operations on the West Bank once the two sides agreed on a declaration of principles.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Cooperation of Hamas, Israel a positive sign A level of cooperation between Israelis and Palestinians in the occupied territories has always existed ("Basic needs give Hamas reason to call its enemy," June 3). It has been a necessity for both sides. Cooperation is needed by Israel so it can govern, and by Palestinians to acquire and maintain basic services. Traditionally, before the intifadas, the point of contact for the Palestinians with the Israeli government was through community or village leaders called mukhtars.
NEWS
By Neve Gordon | April 11, 2005
ISRAEL IS THE key to understanding President Bush's strategy in Iraq. Not because it had any influence over the decision-making process leading to the Iraq war, but because the Bush administration has adopted the democratic occupation model that Israel introduced in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. After the eruption of the first Palestinian intifada in December 1987, Israel had to deploy a relatively large number of troops aided by tanks and armored vehicles to sustain the occupation - exactly as the United States is now doing in Iraq.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | June 29, 2003
If the United States were as adamant about pressuring Israel to get rid of its settlements in the West Bank and Gaza as it has been on the Palestinians to get rid of Yasser Arafat, the prospects for peace would be a lot better these days. The settlements - many of which are huge towns occupied by some 200,000 Israelis in the West Bank and Gaza - are as great an impediment to peace as Arafat is. Taking a genuine, forceful stand against them would not reflect a new policy of the United States.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2003
Three days before the first missiles were loosed on Baghdad, Vice President Dick Cheney repeated an article of faith behind the Bush administration's plan for war against Iraq. "Now, I think things have gotten so bad inside Iraq, from the standpoint of the Iraqi people, my belief is we will, in fact, be greeted as liberators," Cheney said. But the first week of fighting has cast a shadow over such sanguine forecasts. Even in southern Iraq, where the Shiite majority is especially hostile to the regime of Saddam Hussein, American and British troops have faced fierce resistance.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- For weeks, the world waited for President Bush to come up with his plan to deal with the mayhem in the Middle East. The latest round of suicide bombings against Israelis put it on hold for a time, but the president finally came through -- with merely a wish list that depends on unrealistic expectations of constructive behavior on both sides. Principally, Mr. Bush is calling on the Palestinian people to dump Yasser Arafat and turn themselves into citizens of a democracy complete with a new leader, a new legislature, a new judiciary, even a new constitution.
TOPIC
By Charles Glass and Charles Glass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
PARIS -- The return of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell to Israel has revived language that, until now, the Bush administration has avoided: peace process, peace partner and the other words that implied America would intervene in negotiations. The United States has been forced to act, because tolerance of Israeli military assaults in the occupied territories encourages demonstrators to destabilize allied Arab regimes like those of Egypt and Jordan. This time, the Bush people should learn from the failure of the Clinton administration to bring "peace" through the "peace process."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 3, 1992
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army said yesterday that to combat a wave of shootings of Jewish settlers in the West Bank, it was relaxing the rules under which soldiers are allowed to shoot in threatening situations.Four settlers have been killed and several wounded in a series of shooting ambushes in the West Bank and Gaza Strip since October. The attacks, coinciding with the start of the Middle East peace talks, are thought by the army to be the work of radical Palestinian groups opposed to the negotiations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 3, 1992
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army said yesterday that to combat a wave of shootings of Jewish settlers in the West Bank, it was relaxing the rules under which soldiers are allowed to shoot in threatening situations.Four settlers have been killed and several wounded in a series of shooting ambushes in the West Bank and Gaza Strip since October. The attacks, coinciding with the start of the Middle East peace talks, are thought by the army to be the work of radical Palestinian groups opposed to the negotiations.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Hateful propaganda leads Muslim world to detest the West I agree with Thomas L. Friedman to the extent that he applauds the Bush administration's move to increase foreign aid to poor countries and asks for a foreign policy that pursues a course of "enlightened self-interest" ("Let's set a moral example for the world," Opinion * Commentary, March 20). But he is very wrong to assume the Muslims who hate us do so because of our greed or support for their bad regimes or anything we have done.
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