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NEWS
January 25, 1994
A 28-year-old Bowie construction worker was listed in critical but stable condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore yesterday after falling from a roof in Long Reach on Saturday.Robert J. Jeske, of the 15800 block of Plainview Lane, was working on a townhouse at 12:30 p.m. when police say he lost his footing and fell.Mr. Jeske fractured both ankles and sustained other injuries in the fall.A Maryland State Police helicopter flew him to the trauma center, fire and rescue officials said.
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NEWS
October 4, 1993
A longtime Bethlehem Steel Corp. maintenance technician died Saturday after being struck by a tractor carrying steel coils between buildings at the Sparrows Point mill, Baltimore County fire officials reported.Larry E. Flower, 58, of Barrison Point Road in Essex, was dead at the scene at 4:16 p.m. after having been trapped under the tractor, fire officials said. G. Ted Baldwin, a company spokesman, said Mr. Flower had worked for the company for 38 years.The accident is being investigated by the company, the United Steelworkers union, the state medical examiner's office and the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Labor Secretary Robert Reich said businesses should consult their employees on ways to guarantee safety and health in the workplace."Partnership and cooperation between the government and business is often the best way to reduce safety and health hazards in the workplace," Reich told the American Industrial Hygiene Association conference yesterday. He said that partnership should "go beyond" government and business and include employees.Reich's speech came three days before the deadline for public comment on a draft proposal by his department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration to require companies to set up programs to protect safety and health on the job.Some states already require establishment of such programs, which include hazard identification, prevention, and control, as well as employee training.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 24, 1996
GLEN BURNIE -- A 15-year-old boy died Saturday of injuries he received when he was pinned beneath several steel carts in a delivery truck he was helping his father unload, Anne Arundel County police said yesterday.Police did not release the youth's name.According to police, the father and son had just finished unloading supplies about 4 p.m. at the Checkers Restaurant in the 1400 block of N. Crain Highway when the accident occurred.The teen's father told police that he left the truck for a few minutes and when he returned he found his son beneath the carts.
NEWS
January 19, 1993
* John D. Paulus Jr.,an architect who worked on th Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb, died Friday at age 83 in Jefferson City, Mo. Mr. Paulus joined the Raytheon Co. in Concord, Mass., in 1942 and wound up overseeing a group of engineers, drafters and designers working on an electrical guidance system. He also worked on the conceptual design for what was to be the first radar tracking system.* John Stender, 76, appointed by President Nixon as the firsdirector of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, died Saturday after a six-month battle with bone cancer in Seattle.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Investigators identified Friday the employee killed at the Coca-Cola bottling plant in East Baltimore. Joshua Cunningham, a contract worker, died Wednesday when a trailer fell on him, officials said. The Chase resident was 28. The accident occurred about 10:30 a.m. in the 700 block of Kresson St., near East Monument Street and Pulaski Highway, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a fire spokesman. A jack that had been moved under the front of the trailer gave way, said police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
A worker at the Domino Sugar factory in Baltimore died early yesterday in a forklift accident - Maryland's first industrial workplace fatality this year, authorities said. City paramedics responded to the waterfront factory, in the 1100 block of Key Highway, at 2:42 a.m., according to Chief Kevin Cartwright, a city Fire Department spokesman. They found a man suffering from trauma to his head near a forklift, he said. Paramedics pronounced the man dead at the scene. None of the city or state agencies involved in the investigation - nor his employer or the union that represented him - would release the man's name yesterday.
NEWS
January 11, 2000
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday. FACING a storm of criticism, Labor Secretary Alexis Herman has backed away from a letter put out by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that says employers are obligated to assure safe working conditions for employees who work from home. But she has yet to say whether the policy has been rescinded. It should be, as befits one of the most harebrained ideas to come from Washington in years.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 14, 1991
BELL, Calif. -- A 50-year-old man was trapped under tons of sand and mud when the ground gave way under him at a drilling site south of Los Angeles where he was working, Los Angeles County fire officials said yesterday.Officials still held out some hope that Ken Stott of San Bernardino might still be alive hours after he was buried by soil in the freak accident at a Southern California Water Co. plant site. Mr. Stott was there drilling a new well."We're treating it as if he is still alive," said Fire Department Capt.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Thanks for Tim Wheeler 's report that Marylanders understand some of the connections between climate change and human health ("Most Marylanders see climate change harming health," July 17). Last week during a lengthy heat wave, a Massachusetts postman collapsed and died on his route. Many of the local papers covering the story failed to mention climate change as a factor in his death. In fact, outdoor workers are more at risk from extreme heat, and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has prepared a guide for companies whose employees "spend a substantial portion of the shift outdoors.
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