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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Ruma Kumar and Justin Fenton and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTERS | May 1, 2008
A construction worker died yesterday after being crushed in a crane high above a building site near Annapolis in an accident that comes as state officials are looking for ways to tighten safety regulations for such heavy equipment. The laborer, identified by police as Denis Umanzor, 44, of Silver Spring, was killed while working at Annapolis Towne Centre, a $400 million residential, office and shopping complex under construction in Parole. Although authorities have yet to determine what went wrong, a portion of a crane apparently came loose and pinned Umanzor as it was being dismantled - a step described by experts as particularly risky.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
A 45-year-old man doing contract work clearing trees after superstorm Sandy in a residential community in Annapolis was killed by a falling tree on Wednesday afternoon, according to the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. The death is the second caused by a falling tree in Anne Arundel since Sandy entered the region. On Monday night, 74-year-old Donald C. Cannata, Sr. was killed in the kitchen of his Pasadena home after a tree smashed through the roof. In Annapolis, emergency crews first responded shortly before 1 p.m. to the 1600 block of Homewood Road for a report of an injured contractor, said Chief Michael Cox, a fire spokesman.
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NEWS
September 12, 1991
In 1902, Upton Sinclair published a book of fiction, "The Jungle," which told more truth about the American work place than anybody could stand. Among other things, it described packinghouse workers falling off unprotected catwalks and being cooked into lard. Sinclair's book is widely credited with helping establish the Food and Drug Administration and with accelerating efforts to end child labor. It took another story, the ghastly report of the deaths of 146 women and girls in flames at the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. factory in New York, nine years later, to prompt lawmakers to act on safety, however.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 26, 2008
A man who died after falling from scaffolding Tuesday was working for a company that has a history of helmet and safety violations, according to records. Emilio Ernesto Herrera, 42, of Silver Spring was pronounced dead at a Harford County warehouse after authorities were called to the scene about 1:45 p.m. Tuesday. Herrera was working for a masonry company, building a cinder-block wall in an old appliance warehouse on Appliance Drive in Belcamp, said Sgt.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 6, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- The workers, by and large, have been young and healthy. None were smokers, and none had any history of lung disease. But after working at plants that produce food flavorings, they all had one thing in common: They could not breathe. Over the past several years, California health officials have been tracking a handful of workers in flavoring factories who have been incapacitated with a rare, life-threatening lung condition - bronchiolitis obliterans - for which there is no cure or treatment.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 26, 2008
A man who died after falling from scaffolding Tuesday was working for a company that has a history of helmet and safety violations, according to records. Emilio Ernesto Herrera, 42, of Silver Spring was pronounced dead at a Harford County warehouse after authorities were called to the scene about 1:45 p.m. Tuesday. Herrera was working for a masonry company, building a cinder-block wall in an old appliance warehouse on Appliance Drive in Belcamp, said Sgt.
NEWS
May 2, 2008
A series of fatal crane accidents, including one in Annapolis on Wednesday, have Maryland officials rethinking safety regulations for this equipment. There isn't much on the books regarding construction cranes, despite their long-standing use in the industry. Closer scrutiny of this aspect of the trade couldn't hurt. And here's why: Crane operators don't carry special licenses, and operator certification programs are voluntary. But accidents such as the one in Parole Plaza outside Annapolis and the more deadly collapse of a 20-story crane at a construction site in Manhattan in March often occur when a boom or piece of the crane is lowered or extended.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | November 8, 1990
The state labor commissioner says that workers who blatantly ignore safety rules should be subject to fines, just as employers are fined for occupational safety and health violations, but union officials are skeptical of the idea."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 1, 1992
The state's worker safety and health agency has been too easy on Maryland's employers and slow in pursuing discrimination cases, according to a federal audit released yesterday.Launched after a fire killed 25 workers at a North Carolina chicken plant in September, an evaluation by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that Maryland settled too many safety-violation cases informally and failed to adequately verify that safety problems, once identified, had been remedied.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 10, 1991
A grieving mother's personal appeal helped to push higher job-safetyfines through the General Assembly Monday."This is a good thing and, hopefully, another family will be spared this (pain)," said Joan Para, whose 21-year-old son died in a job-related accident March 19.Para, secretary to Sen. American Joe Miedusiewski, D-Baltimore, waged a personal crusade to resurrect a bill that substantially increases the maximum penalties the state can levy for occupational safety violations.The Senate Finance Committee had defeated the bill thesame week that a 12-foot-deep trench collapsed on Para's son. Brian James Para had been laying sewer and water pipes to a Crofton Village home when he was buried alive and suffocated.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 29, 2008
State safety workers are investigating the death of a Pennsylvania man who was struck on the head by a wooden beam at a construction site in northern Harford County yesterday. A 1,000-pound header beam that was being installed over a doorway of a wooden barn struck and killed Christopher Kohler, 42 of Wrightsville, Pa., authorities said. "The victim was on a lift and in the process of setting the header when it fell," said Sgt. David Betz, spokesman for the Harford County sheriff's office.
NEWS
May 2, 2008
A series of fatal crane accidents, including one in Annapolis on Wednesday, have Maryland officials rethinking safety regulations for this equipment. There isn't much on the books regarding construction cranes, despite their long-standing use in the industry. Closer scrutiny of this aspect of the trade couldn't hurt. And here's why: Crane operators don't carry special licenses, and operator certification programs are voluntary. But accidents such as the one in Parole Plaza outside Annapolis and the more deadly collapse of a 20-story crane at a construction site in Manhattan in March often occur when a boom or piece of the crane is lowered or extended.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Ruma Kumar and Justin Fenton and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTERS | May 1, 2008
A construction worker died yesterday after being crushed in a crane high above a building site near Annapolis in an accident that comes as state officials are looking for ways to tighten safety regulations for such heavy equipment. The laborer, identified by police as Denis Umanzor, 44, of Silver Spring, was killed while working at Annapolis Towne Centre, a $400 million residential, office and shopping complex under construction in Parole. Although authorities have yet to determine what went wrong, a portion of a crane apparently came loose and pinned Umanzor as it was being dismantled - a step described by experts as particularly risky.
FEATURES
By Janet Cromley | November 8, 2007
There's some new buzz on vibrating exercise platforms. The machines, which are cropping up with increasing frequency in gyms and exercise rooms, are used during workouts. They're based on the theory that vibrating the body like a giant tuning fork will strengthen muscles, increase flexibility and build bone. Some research suggests the machines may provide moderate benefits, but researchers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston have found that the machines also may exceed occupational safety standards for vibrating equipment such as trucks and heavy machinery.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 6, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- The workers, by and large, have been young and healthy. None were smokers, and none had any history of lung disease. But after working at plants that produce food flavorings, they all had one thing in common: They could not breathe. Over the past several years, California health officials have been tracking a handful of workers in flavoring factories who have been incapacitated with a rare, life-threatening lung condition - bronchiolitis obliterans - for which there is no cure or treatment.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Evers and Stacey Evers,States News Service | June 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Putting an end to striker-replacement practices heads the agenda of hundreds of Steelworkers here this week for their annual legislative conference.Replacing of striking employees by management has become "the most effective union-breaking device" to emerge from the 1980s, when President Reagan demonstrated the practice by firing striking air traffic controllers, said Rep. William D. Ford, D-Mich."It won't be very long before you'll be afraid to face a strike," Ford told members of the United Steelworkers of America.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
Construction companies can expect more frequent inspections and higher fines now that the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health program is becoming more stringent, members of the Carroll County Homebuilders' Association were told Thursday."
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A government warning to mechanics that exposure to asbestos in brakes can cause deadly disease will not be removed from a federal Web site, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has decided not to suspend a scientist who had refused to water down the warning, OSHA officials said. Edwin Foulke Jr., the head of OSHA, made the decision to keep the five-page warning, called a Safety and Health Information Bulletin, on the agency's Web site. The safety bulletin was posted on an OSHA Web site in July and, like a similar Environmental Protection Agency warning to backyard mechanics and small garage operators, has been called scientifically invalid by industries that used, and use, asbestos.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Millions of Americans are exposed regularly to vapors released when they heat products containing the same synthetic butter flavoring blamed for destroying the lungs of workers in popcorn and flavoring factories. But public health activists say no one in government has stepped up to assess whether consumers are at risk. The Food and Drug Administration has jurisdiction over products people ingest but reports it has no plans to investigate. Critics say the agency's response reflects a pattern of governmental indifference to the possible threat posed by breathing diacetyl, a butter flavoring agent.
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