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NEWS
July 29, 1998
POLITICAL stability was achieved but the economic crisis ignored when Japan's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) chose Foreign Minister Keizo Obuchi as its chief. He will be elected prime minister by the lower house of parliament tomorrow.Mr. Obuchi, who has been foreign minister for a year but has no major economic experience, won because he is the boss of the biggest faction of the party.That's how things have always been done by the LDP, which has learned nothing during the current crisis.
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NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | July 25, 2000
WHILE JAPAN'S ruling coalition squeaked through with a narrow victory in the parliamentary elections last month, it barely covers up some deep structural problems that are badly in need of fixes if the country is to keep on course as Asia's most stable democracy and America's chief ally in the Pacific. First, Japan's decade-long recession shows no signs of ending as Japanese consumers, unlike their American counterparts who are bullish about the future, choose to save, rather than spend, their money.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 3, 2000
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi suffered a stroke yesterday, and his condition was considered serious enough that party leaders named an acting prime minister to fulfill his duties. Mikio Aoki, the chief Cabinet secretary, was tapped to step into Obuchi's office temporarily. At a late morning news conference today, Aoki confirmed that Obuchi had suffered a stroke and was in intensive care and would likely be hospitalized for some time. Leaders of Obuchi's ruling Liberal Democratic Party had kept the prime minister's condition virtually secret for most of yesterday.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
TOKYO -- For the first time since World War II, a Japanese prime minister suggested to parliament yesterday that this nominally pacifist nation could soon end its ban on sending troops overseas. In his inaugural speech to the Diet, new Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori said his government may propose legislation that would allow Japanese soldiers to carry weapons abroad and take part in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Japanese forces might also be permitted to take action against ships that violate Japan's territorial waters.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 31, 1998
TOKYO -- Japan's parliament elected Keizo Obuchi, a colorless career politician, yesterday as the country's 84th prime minister and the sixth since President Clinton took office.But a challenge by opposition parties signaled that his tenure and his influence on Japan's staggering economy may be short-lived.Obuchi's ascension was never in doubt after the ruling Liberal Democratic Party chose him as its leader last week. But his victory in the Diet, Japan's parliament, was delayed about four hours when opposition members of the upper house picked Naoto Kan, the leader of the opposition Democratic Party, to lead the nation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1999
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi prepared yesterday for a meeting with President Clinton, working on his economic policy and on his pitching arm.Obuchi, who is to leave today for the first official visit by a Japanese prime minister to the United States in 12 years, is expected to throw out the first ball at a Cubs game at Wrigley Field in Chicago on Saturday.Obuchi, 61, who said he last threw a pitch about 50 years ago, spent part of the afternoon in his back yard with a baseball glove and a former pro pitcher.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1999
TOKYO -- When Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi began his thoroughly unexpected rise in the polls a few months back, the growing support for him had scant relation to his government's policies.It stemmed instead, analysts said, from the inexplicably reassuring feeling he had sent to a nation stuck deep in economic doldrums, coming across as its warm and fuzzy, even slightly absent-minded uncle.Polls have consistently shown that Obuchi's most winning features are his seeming lack of arrogance, his personal modesty and his self-deprecating humor.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
TOKYO -- For the first time since World War II, a Japanese prime minister suggested to parliament yesterday that this nominally pacifist nation could soon end its ban on sending troops overseas. In his inaugural speech to the Diet, new Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori said his government may propose legislation that would allow Japanese soldiers to carry weapons abroad and take part in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Japanese forces might also be permitted to take action against ships that violate Japan's territorial waters.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 1998
TOKYO -- The state visit of the first Chinese leader to set foot on Japanese soil was tarnished yesterday when the two giants of Asia failed to reach common ground over their painful past.Instead, a historic summit between Chinese President Jiang Zemin and Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi foundered when Japan refused to offer a formal apology, nearly 55 years later, for its World War II cruelties.Demonstrating that not all wounds are healed by time, the two sides took the unusual step of refusing to sign the protocol summarizing their summit talks, even though a formal signing ceremony had been scheduled.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | November 1, 1998
"The past isn't over and done with. The past isn't even past."-- William Faulkner A great cliche holds that whereas Germany has forthrightly confronted its war guilt, Japan has not. Perhaps like many cliches, this one at one time carried some truth. But 53 years after the end of World War II, the past is catching up with Japan.Some 40 private lawsuits, filed by foreigners claiming compensation from the Japanese government, are working their way through the Japanese courts. Writers and historians are inquiring into the factors that turned polite young men into brutal soldiers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 3, 2000
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi suffered a stroke yesterday, and his condition was considered serious enough that party leaders named an acting prime minister to fulfill his duties. Mikio Aoki, the chief Cabinet secretary, was tapped to step into Obuchi's office temporarily. At a late morning news conference today, Aoki confirmed that Obuchi had suffered a stroke and was in intensive care and would likely be hospitalized for some time. Leaders of Obuchi's ruling Liberal Democratic Party had kept the prime minister's condition virtually secret for most of yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1999
TOKYO -- When Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi began his thoroughly unexpected rise in the polls a few months back, the growing support for him had scant relation to his government's policies.It stemmed instead, analysts said, from the inexplicably reassuring feeling he had sent to a nation stuck deep in economic doldrums, coming across as its warm and fuzzy, even slightly absent-minded uncle.Polls have consistently shown that Obuchi's most winning features are his seeming lack of arrogance, his personal modesty and his self-deprecating humor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1999
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi prepared yesterday for a meeting with President Clinton, working on his economic policy and on his pitching arm.Obuchi, who is to leave today for the first official visit by a Japanese prime minister to the United States in 12 years, is expected to throw out the first ball at a Cubs game at Wrigley Field in Chicago on Saturday.Obuchi, 61, who said he last threw a pitch about 50 years ago, spent part of the afternoon in his back yard with a baseball glove and a former pro pitcher.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 1998
TOKYO -- The state visit of the first Chinese leader to set foot on Japanese soil was tarnished yesterday when the two giants of Asia failed to reach common ground over their painful past.Instead, a historic summit between Chinese President Jiang Zemin and Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi foundered when Japan refused to offer a formal apology, nearly 55 years later, for its World War II cruelties.Demonstrating that not all wounds are healed by time, the two sides took the unusual step of refusing to sign the protocol summarizing their summit talks, even though a formal signing ceremony had been scheduled.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1998
HARBIN, China -- On a cold morning in the fall of 1939, Japanese soldiers prepared to tie Huang Heyuan to a wooden cross and cut his heart out.Huang, then a 26-year-old Chinese construction worker, had been brought to a biological warfare testing center in Manchuria by Japanese soldiers who promised to help him. Instead, they injected Huang and other prisoners with bubonic plague and dissected them alive without anesthesia to study the bacteria's effects.Huang...
NEWS
By Hal Piper | November 1, 1998
"The past isn't over and done with. The past isn't even past."-- William Faulkner A great cliche holds that whereas Germany has forthrightly confronted its war guilt, Japan has not. Perhaps like many cliches, this one at one time carried some truth. But 53 years after the end of World War II, the past is catching up with Japan.Some 40 private lawsuits, filed by foreigners claiming compensation from the Japanese government, are working their way through the Japanese courts. Writers and historians are inquiring into the factors that turned polite young men into brutal soldiers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 19, 1998
TOKYO -- Japanese leaders agreed yesterday on a plan designed to restore the nation's debt-burdened banks to health, a crucial step to reviving growth in the world's second largest economy.The plan calls for a government takeover of some of the country's biggest and weakest banks, closing smaller institutions and pumping trillions of yen in taxpayer money into the banking system to dispose of bad loans.The prolonged debate over what to do about Japanese banks took on new urgency in recent months as it became clear that Japan's slumping economy -- now in its third quarter of contraction -- threatened growth around the world.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | August 23, 1998
TOKYO - The Orioles' Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver used to say that a team is never as good as it looks when it is winning, and never as bad as it looks when losing. Japan's new prime minister, Keizo Obuchi, might take comfort in that.Japan's losing streak is about as old as the decade, but it seems to be accelerating. Business-page headlines this month have been uniformly dreary - bankruptcies up; stock market down; corporate capital investment down; banks cutting off credit to shaky companies; corporate bond ratings downgraded.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 19, 1998
TOKYO -- Japanese leaders agreed yesterday on a plan designed to restore the nation's debt-burdened banks to health, a crucial step to reviving growth in the world's second largest economy.The plan calls for a government takeover of some of the country's biggest and weakest banks, closing smaller institutions and pumping trillions of yen in taxpayer money into the banking system to dispose of bad loans.The prolonged debate over what to do about Japanese banks took on new urgency in recent months as it became clear that Japan's slumping economy -- now in its third quarter of contraction -- threatened growth around the world.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | August 23, 1998
TOKYO - The Orioles' Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver used to say that a team is never as good as it looks when it is winning, and never as bad as it looks when losing. Japan's new prime minister, Keizo Obuchi, might take comfort in that.Japan's losing streak is about as old as the decade, but it seems to be accelerating. Business-page headlines this month have been uniformly dreary - bankruptcies up; stock market down; corporate capital investment down; banks cutting off credit to shaky companies; corporate bond ratings downgraded.
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