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By Shannon McCaffrey and Shannon McCaffrey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The rules of evidence are still being written. There's no witness protection program. Forget impartial judges - the violent insurgency in Iraq has made it difficult to find them at all. And those who have been recruited are so fearful of retribution that their identities are being shielded. The fledgling Iraqi Special Tribunal is facing an uphill climb as it prepares to try Saddam Hussein on charges of war crimes and genocide from his more than two decades in power. "There are enormous obstacles confronting this tribunal," says Richard Dicker, the head of the International Justice Program for the New York-based Human Rights Watch.
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SPORTS
By Louis Krauss and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
On a hot and misty July morning in the woods near Savage, several kids and adults screamed with joy as they flew past treetops on a zip line. There was joy, and probably more than a little fear, in those Tarzan yells. Zooming down the 330-foot-long cable, zip liners, the staff of Terrapin Adventures estimates, can reach speeds of up to 20 mph. In other words, it's far from a typical day at work. Founder and owner Matt Baker, who started Terrapin Adventures six years ago in a woodsy patch of Howard County, said the courses, which combine simple fun with team-building activities, strive for "the 'Aha!
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NEWS
By Alan Lupo | March 13, 1992
IT COMES as a surprise to many Americans to hear the occasional suggestion that Israelis and/or Palestinians are not the only obstacles to peace or justice in the Middle East.The key word is "occasional," because that is how often the media allude to the other obstacles, such as repression of liberties in Arab nations, civil wars, tribal and family feuds and the spread of Islamic fundamentalism.Of course, we have covered terrorism, Libya, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon, because terrorism and events in those nations have directly affected us. But you haven't heard much lately about those democratic reforms in Kuwait, have you?
NEWS
August 27, 2014
Baltimore's proposed Red Line passed a significant milestone this week with mixed results. The good news is that officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged a combined $280 million to help build the 14-mile light rail project, less enthralling is that the total cost has risen a quarter-billion dollars to $2.9 billion. Critics will no doubt seize on the higher cost as a sign of incompetence, waste, poor planning or the usual brickbats thrown at taxpayer-financed projects of all kinds.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau | February 9, 1992
AMERICAN CORNER -- In the heartland of Maryland's 1st Congressional District, where towns not much bigger than their zip codes have such inviting names as Friendship and Harmony, Republican Thomas Jones says the things that make GOP candidates wince."
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker Reporter Martin Evans of The Sun's Metro staff contributed to this article | May 25, 1991
Some of Baltimore's movers and shakers are pushing a vision of a regional economy anchored by life-sciences industries, but business people and bureaucrats agree it won't be achieved unless both the public and private sectors rally behind that goal.A random sampling of business and political leaders indicates that they view that goal, articulated this week by the Greater Baltimore Committee, as logical.They said a life sciences economy is achievable but pragmatically noted that significant obstacles must first be overcome.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
Nelson B. Dorsey has worked hard to succeed in business. Anyone has to, he says, whether they're young or old, black or white.But because "all is not well" in the world, minorities often have to work harder, said Dorsey, who is black.He hopes his efforts haven't gone unnoticed by his two sons."My message is if you really want to do it, you can, but you have to prepare yourself, that there will be obstacles along the way," said Dorsey, who lives near Westminster. He works for the U.S. Postal Service and owns rental properties in the county.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Management and union negotiators suspended their public bickering yesterday and met three times in an attempt to move closer to a new labor agreement, but time is running short. The strike deadline imposed by the Major League Baseball Players Association is little more than two days away, and there still has been no breakthrough on any of the three most difficult issues facing the bargaining teams. Ownership negotiators still were waiting late yesterday for a counter-proposal from the union on the enhanced revenue sharing plan and heavy luxury tax system demanded by management.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | September 19, 2006
District B13 is an action movie for the rest of us. Moviegoers who were awed by the treetop martial arts on display in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon knew they could never attempt such feats in their own backyards. And fans of Jackie Chan appreciate his kung fu while knowing such acrobatics are beyond their ken. But the stars of District B13 insist that their leaps, tumbles and jumps can -- for the most part -- be replicated by anyone. The film, released on DVD, introduces to filmgoers a new style of action called parkour, a French term that means using fast, fluid movements to advance through an urban terrain.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 28, 2002
WASHINGTON - The destination is in plain view but remains out of reach. Many, possibly a majority, of Israelis and Palestinians, plus key officials around the world, agree on how the half-century Israeli-Palestinian conflict will end: Create two states divided roughly along Israel's pre-1967 borders; allow two capitals in Jerusalem, making special arrangements for holy sites sacred to each side; and resolve the problem of Palestinian refugees in a...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
SPORTS
By Louis Krauss, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
On a hot day in May in a patch of grass near power lines in Odenton, Jared Conover and Ryan Smith are hard at work building a wooden frame that will soon be used in their new obstacle course. Insects buzz and a neighbor's chickens squawk in a nearby pen as the two men picture the frantic, grueling scene when the obstacles they're hammering, drilling and screwing together in this rural setting are put to use. "This one is a rope and chain traverse. This will be up 10 feet in the air, with cross beams and ropes hanging," Smith says.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
"Since Affirmed in 1978" - it has to be the most overused phrase in thoroughbred racing. And yet it's inevitable every spring, when a new crop of 3-year-olds takes a shot at the sport's most cherished prize - the Triple Crown. Affirmed was the last to do it, 36 years ago, and the ensuing drought has coincided with a long downturn in popularity for racing. The sport's stakeholders have hungered for a new superstar, and a Triple Crown seems the surest way to make one. Which is where California Chrome enters the picture.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The Orioles returned home early Friday morning alone in first place atop the American League East, a half-game in front of the New York Yankees. They open a six-game homestand against the Houston Astros and Detroit Tigers on Friday night. They don't know when Matt Wieters will be back behind the plate as he rests his sore throwing elbow. And while they're cautiously optimistic about slugging first baseman Chris Davis's recovery from a strained oblique, he still must take a few steps before he returns to the starting lineup.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
The mother of an Ellicott City man who died a year ago following an obstacle race in West Virginia has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the organizers of the Tough Mudder event. Mita Sengupta, mother of Avishek Sengupta, claims that Tough Mudder was negligent in moving mud racers through a "walk the plank" obstacle, and did not provide proper supervision or safety precautions. She filed the lawsuit in Marshall County Circuit Court in West Virginia last month and is seeking unspecified damages and attorneys' fees.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Now should be the time for the Port of Baltimore to show the world that it's open for business. Work resumed in February on the expansion of the Panama Canal, which is now expected to be completed in 2015. When that happens, super-sized cargo ships will be able to traverse that century-old connection between the Atlantic and Pacific, and as it stands, only two East Coast ports will be able to handle them: Norfolk and Baltimore. But a lingering labor dispute between the steamship lines and one of the port's unions that led to a three-day strike last fall is giving the Port of Baltimore a black eye at precisely the wrong time.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1999
Joshlyn Williams doesn't look down as she reaches the top of the 15-foot pole. Shouts of support are coming from her teammates, but the slight 14-year-old is focused inward, eyes briefly closed, as mind and body align in a fierce effort to stand up without falling.Her eyes open. Her knees straighten, then her back -- and she's upright. Just one hurdle left."Jump, Joshlyn. JUMP!" come the shouts from below.A moment of hesitation -- and she does, harness and wire easing her to the ground amid applause and cheers from other city youngsters and the Maryland Police Corps cadets who are their mentors and coaches.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
Cyclocross -- As part of its "Step Up to Health" campaign, Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will join forces with the Baltimore-based Lateral Stress Velo's cycling club and team to sponsor an inaugural "Rockburn Cross." The event, which is to begin at 10 a.m. Sunday at Rockburn Branch Park in Elkridge, is a hybrid between high-speed bicycle racing and technical mountain-bike racing, and includes man-made hurdles and natural obstacles that require riders to sometimes dismount and run with their bikes.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
New technology that could stop or slow a train before an accident - reducing the likelihood of operator errors becoming deadly - will be installed on all MARC trains. The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a $13 million contract on Wednesday to begin installing "positive train control" equipment, which uses GPS and radio signaling to react automatically if a collision or derailment is anticipated. Such a system might have prevented the December derailment of a New York passenger train that came off the tracks as it sped too fast into a turn, killing four and injuring more than 70. It would have prevented the 1996 collision between a MARC train and an Amtrak train in Silver Spring that killed 11 people, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates all major rail accidents.
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