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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - As John Gilchrist sat on the Maryland bench in the closing minutes of yesterday's 84-72 loss to Clemson in the opening round of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament at MCI Center, the junior point guard tried to wipe away a steady stream of tears. Gilchrist's tears weren't from the pain in his left ankle, which he rolled late in the first half and caused him to miss much of the second half, but from a season of pained performances by the Terrapins that continued with a third straight loss to the Tigers.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 14, 2014
If. Two letters long, it is arguably the most fruitless word in the English language, an evocation of paths not taken, possibilities foreclosed, regrets stacked high -- and it lies like a pall of smoke over President Obama's Wednesday-night announcement that this country is returning to war, albeit with air strikes only, in a place we just left behind in 2011 after spending almost nine years, over a trillion dollars and 4,425 lives. If. As in, if President Bush had concentrated on toppling the Taliban in Afghanistan, which harbored the authors of the terrorist strike we suffered 13 years ago last week, if he had not rushed to judgment, convincing himself Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was behind the attack, if his administration had not used suspect intelligence to claim Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, if we had not bought into the fantasy that we could impose a Jeffersonian democracy on another nation and have them thank us for it, if we had not destabilized the region, if we had never kicked this hornet's nest, would we now find ourselves obliged to confront the criminal gang that calls itself the Islamic State?
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NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 1, 2008
Philosophically, one of the dangers is we've made debt a four-letter word. I wonder what it will do to a generation that will go to college without any personal sacrifice. You start taking loans away, and you start saying, `Here's a free ride.'" - LEE COFFIN, dean of admissions at Tufts University, who opposes the move by Harvard and other universities to eliminate loan obligations for students from upper-middle-class families
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Ending weeks of speculation, state Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said Monday he will not seek to replace City Councilman William H. Cole IV, who is leaving the council to run Baltimore's economic development corporation.  "As a former member of the City Council who represented the 11th district, I was asked by my former colleagues and community leaders to seek the appointment to the seat," Mitchell said in a statement. "After much thought, prayer, and deliberation with family and friends, I have decided not to seek a return to the City Council.
FEATURES
By Barbara Turk, M.S | November 12, 1991
Your spouse says you need to work on your marriage. You don't need more work. And, besides, a marriage shouldn't need work. The relationship should just come naturally, be spontaneous -- right?Spontaneous would be nice, but that's not happening or your spouse wouldn't be advocating "work."With job, chores, kids, finances -- that stressful stuff -- you can't muster the effort to "work" on your marriage.Since you associate it with stressful things, the word "work" is getting in the way here.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | August 9, 2006
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it had cut its pension obligations by $3.9 billion and its retiree health care obligations by $19.3 billion because of employee buyouts and cost-cutting agreements with the United Auto Workers union. Even so, GM carries $62 billion in future retiree health care obligations on its books. The automaker has long maintained that legacy costs put it at a disadvantage against its global rivals. The expense adds $1,500 to the cost of every vehicle it builds in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Human Genome Sciences has an enviable $1.55 billion in cash, but as the company released its third-quarter earnings report yesterday, its executives once again were dogged by questions about how long even that amount will last. The reasons: The Rockville-based company is spending heavily to develop eight drugs in clinical trials; simultaneously, it has acquired or is constructing buildings for research, administration and manufacturing, requiring it to set aside a growing amount of its cash as collateral for the off-balance-sheet borrowings that back them.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | November 12, 1991
NEW YORK -- General Motors Corp., the country's largest manufacturer, is being forced to acknowledge how much maintaining the heartbeat of America really costs.Last weekend it announced it had obligations of $16 billion to $24 billion for post-retirement health care for workers. Subtract what GM is committed to pay -- but yet to fund -- for pensions, and the result is a company with no net worth.GM's plight is likely the most egregious example, but it is not the only company in the midst of revealing corporate destitution to the public.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Less than half of Maryland's 260,000 families entitled to child support actually receive it. For 123,000 families on welfare, the situation is even worse: 75 percent of these families never receive support payments from spouses. The link between the two groups is more than coincidental. Too often, the state must close the gap between what children need to survive and what they get from absentee parents.In the '80s, states and the federal government put real teeth in collection efforts, using Social Security numbers and computers to tap wages, income tax refunds and even lottery winnings of spouses responsible for support payments.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2002
Bethlehem Steel Corp. said yesterday that, because of a seasonal slowdown, softer-than-expected demand for steel and the short Thanksgiving workweek, about 700 workers will be temporarily off the job next week. The bankrupt steelmaker will virtually cease operations on its finishing side, which is easier to start and stop than the steel-making side of the plant. The workers can either take accrued vacation time or be on temporary layoff and apply for unemployment benefits. Workers on the steel-making side of the Sparrows Point plant will not be affected.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 7, 2014
A New Jersey high school senior, who claims she was kicked out of the house but whose parents claim she left rather than abide by their rules, has filed suit against them demanding financial support. Rachel Canning, who is now 18, moved in with a friend in October. She is asking a judge to require her parents to pay more than $650 a week in support, to pay the remainder due on her Catholic high school tuition and to give her access to a college fund they have for her. In addition, she wants them pay $12,000 in attorney's fees to the father of the friend she now lives with, who filed the suit on her behalf.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
Russia's incursion into Ukraine has created a mess, and hopefully America will stay out of it ( "Containing Putin," March 3). Let NATO, the United Nations and the European Union work things out, though military action by any of them is unlikely. In fact, NATO's Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, Gen. Philip Breedlove, told reporters that the alliance "had no military plans to support Ukraine if it were attacked. " On Friday, President Obama said the U.S. "will stand with the international community in affirming there will be costs for any military intervention in Ukraine.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 17, 2014
Nine months before the midterm congressional elections that could make or break the final push for President Obama's legacy, he is revving up a broader outreach effort in the hope of reviving the support and spirit that brought him two terms in the Oval Office. He says he will make greater use of executive-branch initiatives to achieve aspects of his original agenda for change that have encountered legislative roadblocks over his first three years in the White House. He is launching a series of conversations with educators, private-sector leaders and outside nonprofit groups that has the look of an end-run around the recalcitrant Congress on projects achievable through the unique powers of the executive.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
The latest out of the extreme conservative wing of the Republican party is that a failure of the U.S. government to take the steps necessary to pay all its bills on time would be no biggie. They say we could juggle things around and avoid missing any payments on the debt, which they figure is the only thing our creditors really care about. Some, such as Sen. Rand Paul, go a step further and say failure to raise the government's borrowing limit might be a blessing: "If you don't raise the debt limit," he told the New York Times, "all you're saying is, 'We're going to be balancing the budget.'" Um, no. What you're saying is that the federal government is going to start picking and choosing which bills to pay. Depending on the vagaries of cash flow, maybe today the military doesn't get paid, maybe tomorrow Social Security checks don't go out, or maybe Medicare can't cover its bills.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Baltimore County recently mailed bills for its new stormwater fees, and the Social Security Administration faces a charge of more than $35,000 for its Woodlawn headquarters. But it's unclear if the agency will pay a penny. "At this time we have not determined whether it will be appropriate to remit payment for those assessments," spokeswoman Dorothy J. Clark said. "We will study the issue and come to a decision in the near future. " The uncertainty reflects a broader murkiness on whether federal agencies will pay the new state-mandated fee. Derided by some as a "rain tax," the fees are meant to pay for pollution-reducing improvements and are generally based on a property's amount of paved or hard surfaces.
NEWS
By Kevin Philpy | June 19, 2013
I read with great interest The Sun's recent article about the reaction of churches that are protesting the soon-to-be instituted stormwater fee. The work being done by the churches named in the article is commendable - food pantries, assistance to the homeless, and the like - and their work to keep their ministries solvent in a difficult economy is certainly not easy. Having been part of the denominational church for my entire life, I understand that there's only so much money to go around, and that it's impossible to help every person in need, but that God commands us to try to do so anyway.
NEWS
By TONY PROSCIO | December 24, 1992
Miami. -- Theresa Funiciello, firebrand agitator for the rights o welfare recipients, once howled in the face of a New York welfare commissioner: ''Don't talk to me about clients' obligations! Read the law, mister! Welfare is an entitlement. The obligations are yours!''The year, I think, was 1982, barely 18 months into the first Reagan term and hardly the best time for welfare-rights types. Yet the commissioner, a burnt-out public servant acquainted with grief, merely shook his head.As a legal matter, she was right.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 24, 1992
The tablecloth might be 100 years old, maybe older. Or maybe it's my age. Anyway, I feel old ironing it. But it is still a thing of beauty.With intricate blue cross-stitch on the border, pastel flowers in each corner and a cornucopia centerpiece, it's a masterpiece of needlework.I hate to iron, always have. I will scrub your floor, but don't bring me your ironing. I thought I retired the iron when I retired.As I stand here pressing the large cloth, however, I am thinking that Thanksgiving is a splendid holiday.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
I did a double take reading your editorial that excused Maryland lawmakers for raiding $1 billion from the state's transportation trust fund to spend on other programs ("We all benefit from transit, and we should all pay for it" Mar 25). Let's explore the logic further. Imagine your neighborhood bank loans an individual money to start a small business. That individual changes his mind and instead uses the money to remodel his home. With a straight face, he informs the bank he's not going to repay the first loan, but expects a second one because he's finally getting around to starting that business.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Todd Huff isn't the first Baltimore County councilman to be arrested for drunk driving, and if he's convicted of the crime, he won't be the first in that regard either. And we will not delude ourselves by expecting him to be the last to face such charges - at least not in a nation where 1.4 million people are arrested annually for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. But the circumstances of Mr. Huff's arrest are disappointing to say the least and raise serious questions about his judgment - not only in his choice to get behind the wheel of his county-owned vehicle after drinking enough at the Towson Elks Lodge to record a .20 on an alcohol breath test but in telling police after his arrest that he wanted to call "Jim Johnson," an obvious reference to the county's police chief.
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