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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
From the prayer book she carried to the flower petals she kept pressed inside its pages, Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange has long been a vivid presence at the headquarters of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the order of African-American Catholic nuns she founded in Baltimore in 1829. Now pilgrims and worshippers can get even closer to Lange. As part of a campaign to have her declared a saint, church officials received and reinterred her remains at the order's mother church in Relay on Monday.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
From the prayer book she carried to the flower petals she kept pressed inside its pages, Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange has long been a vivid presence at the headquarters of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the order of African-American Catholic nuns she founded in Baltimore in 1829. Now pilgrims and worshippers can get even closer to Lange. As part of a campaign to have her declared a saint, church officials received and reinterred her remains at the order's mother church in Relay on Monday.
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NEWS
September 13, 2002
Sister Mary Beatrice, a member of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, died Saturday of cardiac arrest at her order's mother house in Catonsville. She was 83. Born Matilde Hernandez in Cardenas, Cuba, she entered her Roman Catholic religious order Sept. 3, 1939. She professed her vows at St. Frances Convent on East Chase Street in 1942. From 1948 to 1961, she worked in schools in Cuba.. She then moved to Baltimore and became the portress - the sister assigned to monitor the front door - at St. Frances Academy, her order's school.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The Rev. John Wesley Bowen, a Roman Catholic priest and church historian who advocated sainthood for a 19th-century Baltimore woman, died of pneumonia Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Catonsville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Linden Avenue, he attended Mount St. Joseph High School before entering the old St. Charles College, a seminary. He earned degrees in philosophy and theology at St. Mary's Seminary and the Catholic University of America, where he also earned a second master's degree.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2004
Sister Mary Paul Lee, a retired educator and treasurer of her Roman Catholic religious order, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 1 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 75 and lived at her order's Arbutus motherhouse. The granddaughter of a slave owned by Jesuit priests at Georgetown University, she was born Susan Grace Lee in Philadelphia. She related her experiences there as a black high school basketball player on a predominantly white team in a 2002 issue of U.S. Catholic.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
Sister M. Joetta McGill, a member and retired treasurer general of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, died of heart failure Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 84. She was born Rebecca McGill in New Haven, Ky., where she was raised. She graduated from the Catholic Colored High School under the guidance of the Ursuline Sisters in Louisville, Ky. She then earned a bachelor's degree in education from St. Mary's College in Leavenworth, Kan. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence religious order in 1938 and took her vows in 1941.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Sister Mary Carmen Deschapelles, an Oblate Sister of Providence and retired parochial school educator, died Dec. 29 of heart failure at Future Care Nursing Home at North Point. She was 86. Caridad Maria Deschapelles Cassio was born and raised in Cardenas, Cuba. She was a graduate of St. Jose High School in Cardenas and earned a bachelor's degree from Cardenas Institute. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1944 and professed her vows in 1947, taking the name Sister Mary Carmen.
NEWS
November 6, 2007
Sister Mary Reparata Clarke, a member and retired secretary general of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, died Oct. 28 of complications from diabetes at Summit Nursing Home in Catonsville. She was 90. Catherine Lois Clarke was born in Baltimore and raised on Druid Hill Avenue. She was a 1935 graduate of Douglass High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland in 1957. In 1968, she earned a master's degree from Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. Before entering her order in 1940, she worked as a typist and substitute teacher in Baltimore public schools.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2005
When St. Frances Academy principal Sister John Francis Schilling discovered three weeks ago that the cost to replace 10 heating units at the East Chase Street school totaled $62,000, she knew that the work could not be delayed with winter settling in. She also knew that St. Frances didn't have the money and couldn't come up with that amount on short notice. So, Schilling resorted to what she often does when facing such predicaments: She turned toward heaven and prayed to Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange, co-founder of the school and Schilling's religious order, the 176-year-old Oblate Sisters of Providence.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
Sister Leona Williams, a member of the Oblate Sisters of Providence for more than six decades and a retired librarian, died May 26 of a heart attack at Future Care Cherrywood Healthcare and Rehabilitation in Reisterstown. She was 88. Ann Louise Williams was born in Tyler, Texas. She later moved with her family to Spokane, Wash., where she graduated from North Central High School. She earned a bachelor's degree from Holy Names College in Spokane and traveled to Baltimore in 1944 when she entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence.
NEWS
April 24, 2012
I have always admired Bill Cosby. From the time my father brought home an album, "Why Is There Air?", I thought he was hilarious yet keenly insightful. I don't think there was anyone who could make my dad laugh like Mr. Cosby. His comedic career was always marked by the fact that he never had to resort to being profane or obscene. I have now acquired an equal admiration for his wife, Camille. Together, the Cosbys donated $2 million dollars to the St. Frances Academy, which is run by the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the oldest African-American order of nuns in the nation ("Baltimore honors the Cosbys," March 31)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
When St. Frances Academy needed another $2 million to build its community center in East Baltimore, one nun turned to her "good friends and two of the very finest persons I know" — the Cosbys. Sister Mary Alice Chineworth, an Oblate Sister of Providence and one of the school's longest-serving teachers, called the couple. Camille Cosby said yes right away. Her husband, Bill, one of the country's best-known comedians, insisted repeatedly, amid much laughter at a dedication ceremony Friday, that he was not consulted.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
A historic Baltimore Catholic school will name its community center in honor of Bill and Camille Cosby, the biggest donors in the school's 184-year history and fierce champions of education, the school announced Friday. St. Frances Academy, which serves 162 primarily low-income high school students, will host the comedian, his wife and their relatives in a ceremony at the St. Frances Community Center on April 20. In addition to giving $2 million to St. Frances in 2005 to support its scholarship program, Camille Cosby also has a strong connection to the founders of the Baltimore school, having been educated by the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the oldest order of African-American nuns in the country, for seven years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
The Archdiocese of Baltimore added a new religious order of nuns Tuesday, its first in decades and one that began as an Anglican community. The All Saints' Sisters of the Poor left the Episcopal Church for the Roman Catholic Church two years ago. By a decree from the Vatican, they are now an official diocesan priory, or order, the same designation carried by the School Sisters of Notre Dame or the Daughters of Charity. "We feel we have broken ground," said Mother Christina Christie, leader of the community and a nun since 1966.
EXPLORE
August 1, 2011
Baltimore Restaurant Week - presented by Visit Baltimore and the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, is Aug. 5-14. Participating restaurants will offer a choice of pre-selected, three-course dinner menus for $35.11 and three-course lunch menus for $20.11. Go to http://www.baltimorerestaurantweek.com . The National Aquarium - 501 E. Pratt St., hosts a 30th anniversary festival, featuring live entertainment and activities for all ages, Aug. 5, noon-7 p.m.; Aug, 6, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; and Aug. 7, 10 a.m. -3 p.m. Free.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
The body of William Donald Schaefer lay in state Tuesday in the marble rotunda of City Hall, and a line curled around the historic building as people waited to pay their respects. Standing in the bright April sun, the mourners — old and young, rich and poor, black and white — clutched photos of Schaefer and described how he shaped their lives and their city. Here are some of their stories: Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi It's been more than three decades, but Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi still hums the jingle when she sees a street corner trash basket: "Trash Ball, it's a neat game everybody can win. Let me show you how to play.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
Tomorrow afternoon, Mayor Martin O'Malley, Cardinal William H. Keeler, invited guests and interested citizens will gather at 610 George St. (near Paca Street) for the unveiling of a stone monument commemorating the site where in a rented house, no longer extant, Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange founded the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the oldest order of black nuns in the nation, in 1829. The monument, a joint effort of the city and the Archdiocese of Baltimore, was spearheaded by Tom Saunders of the city's Community Relations Commission, who also leads tours to historic sites in Baltimore associated with black history.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Sister Mary Carmen Deschapelles, an Oblate Sister of Providence and retired parochial school educator, died Dec. 29 of heart failure at Future Care Nursing Home at North Point. She was 86. Caridad Maria Deschapelles Cassio was born and raised in Cardenas, Cuba. She was a graduate of St. Jose High School in Cardenas and earned a bachelor's degree from Cardenas Institute. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1944 and professed her vows in 1947, taking the name Sister Mary Carmen.
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