Advertisement
HomeCollectionsObesity
IN THE NEWS

Obesity

NEWS
March 28, 2011
For too many Marylanders, basketball is a game to be watched on television, running is the circumstance of their computers and hiking is what the General Assembly does to taxes around this time of year. For the firmly rooted couch potato, exercise is low on the to-do list. It's a chronic and worsening problem. A recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention documents, county-by-county, just how bad it has become. Nationally, about one-quarter of adults do not spend free time being physically active or participating in such things as walking for exercise, golfing, playing tennis or running.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
As a single mom struggling to navigate the work-life juggle, Tynesha Ross found herself cutting corners at dinner time. After work and exhausted, she'd make a beeline for McDonald's. Happy meals for her two kids, a value meal for her. Home. Eat. Homework. Bed. The ease of the routine bumped up against the reality of her poor health. Overweight and unhappy, she began going to weekly Weight Watchers meetings at the community nonprofit DRU/Mondawmin Healthy Families, where she learned shortcuts for making healthy food.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Blacks have higher rates of obesity than whites, but doctors of black patients are less likely to counsel them on how to lose weight, according to a recent study from Johns Hopkins researchers that raises thorny questions about racial stereotypes and the stigma of obesity. The findings troubled researchers who set out to tackle what role race played in weight-loss counseling. Coaching patients to eat better and exercise can help fight obesity, but too often primary-care doctors don't have the time or don't make the effort to do so, said Sara Bleich, assistant professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
A team of 30 volunteers from Johns Hopkins plans to partner with Baltimore City schools to offer city teens screening for early signs of heart disease. The free exams will look for key risk factors including obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes and family history of disease. With the findings, officials hope to curb increasingly common bad eating and exercising habits before they become engrained. Hopkins officials already had been screening Maryland athletes for heart abnormalities and decided to expand the program to some 2,000 13-year-olds expected to attend a high school fair at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute Nov. 13 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. "One of the surprise findings from our other heart screenings was that basic risk factors for cardiovascular disease are too common among Maryland high-school students, and these students and their parents are simply unaware that they face a serious health problem," said Dr. Theodore Abraham, a cardiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital who is spearheading the screening efforts.
HEALTH
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
The Baltimore City Council's education committee assembled school officials, the health commissioner and fitness advocates on Thursday to discuss a trend emerging in city schools: While students are meeting state standards in their physical education requirements, they're also getting fatter. During a committee hearing at City Hall, city and school leaders explored ways that the school system could strengthen its current standards of physical activity and health instruction to combat the growing trend of childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which half of the city's students born after the year 2000 are at risk for. "This is so important in the lives of our children, who are dying before their parents," said City Councilwoman Agnes Welch, a longtime advocate of combating childhood obesity.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The usual stars of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore — the wild cats, hulking elephants and graceful cranes whose habitats are re-created on the grounds — lost some of the spotlight Tuesday to the players, cheerleaders and mascot of the Baltimore Ravens, as the team and zoo played host to about 120 local schoolchildren for an annual community service event. Tuesday was the NFL/United Way's annual "Hometown Huddle," a leaguewide day of service, which this year is focused on combating childhood obesity by getting kids to be more active.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
New Yorkers do occasionally have some good ideas. They promoted the elimination of trans fats, the prohibition of smoking in restaurants, and recently they tossed out the idea of banning the purchase of sugary sodas with Food Stamps. The thinking behind the concept, proposed by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Gov. David A. Patterson, is that since Food Stamps are given out by the government in the name of nutrition, they shouldn't be used to buy products that contribute to obesity and diabetes.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Some of Dr. Maria Brown's young patients won't be getting a prescription they can fill at a pharmacy. Instead, they'll be instructed to fill their lungs with fresh air, feel the sunlight on their skin and stretch their muscles in the great outdoors. They will be told to walk around the block, visit a nature center or take a bike ride with their parents. Brown is a nature champion, trained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to teach other health care providers at St. Agnes Hospital about the benefits of getting children outside to combat obesity and accompanying diseases such as diabetes and asthma.
NEWS
July 21, 2010
So the First Lady was at Camden Yards, in partnership with Major League Baseball, to fight childhood obesity. Who thought that one up? There are controversies: about whether obesity per se should be the focus, or health and healthy living; about how much the war on obesity is really a war on the obese, reflecting all kinds of cultural bias, prejudice, and oppressions; about how - once there is consensus on what the problems and solutions actually...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
First lady Michelle Obama will be at Oriole Park at Camden Yards next week to promote her "Let's Move!" campaign to end childhood obesity. Obama is expected on Tuesday to an announce a joint initiative between her campaign and Major League Baseball, the White House announced Friday. The program's goal is to address the problem of childhood obesity within a generation, according to its website, so the children of today will reach adulthood at a healthy weight. After Tuesday's announcement, Orioles Adam Jones, Matt Wieters, Will Ohman and and Corey Patterson — as well as visiting Tampa Bay Rays players — will host a clinic for 50 baseball players from local Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities leagues and Boys & Girls Clubs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.