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November 8, 2011
Editor: During the legislative session of Oct. 18, the Harford County Council acting in both its capacity as the Board of Health and the legislative body unanimously approved Resolution 28-11 establishing a Harford County Obesity Task Force.  According to our most recent data, the health of Harford County adults and children has declined from 1996 to 2010 with respect to numerous chronic diseases including, diabetes, heart disease, high...
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 5, 2014
There are endless metrics to gauge whether the United States is ahead or behind other countries. Finland does education better and cheaper. Russians and central Europeans beat Americans in alcohol consumption. But it takes only five minutes for the average American to earn enough money to buy a pint of beer -- far less time than in any other nation. And, when it comes to meat consumption, only the Australians come close to matching the amount of dead animal we eat in the land of the free and the home of the obese.
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NEWS
May 11, 2012
The number of Americans considered obese is expected to rise from the current 34 percent to 42 percent by the year 2030, according to a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and discussed at Monday's "Weight of the Nation" conference in Washington. Diabetes, kidney failure, heart disease, and other obesity-related ailments account for countless premature deaths and as much as 18 percent of the $2.6 trillion national cost of medical care. The leading causes of obesity are consumption of fat-laden meat and dairy products and lack of exercise.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 14, 2014
New research suggests that Americans aren't obese because we eat too much. It's because we exercise too little. And by too little I mean, not at all. And whatever exercise we get peaks before the age of 10 - and perhaps as early as 2 - and is in steady decline after that, according to another study. Researchers at Stanford University Medical Center examined 22 years of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a long-term project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
AS IF THE agony of filing taxes weren't complicated enough, the annual trek through the numbers of our lives could now involve one more awful calculation: that of our body mass index, the measure of how much fat we're carrying around. The social engineers at the Internal Revenue Service have just ruled that obesity, like smoking and alcoholism, is a disease. So, if a doctor says you're obese, then the cost of weight-loss programs could be tax deductible -- even if your extra pounds haven't yet made you sick.
NEWS
By David Horsey | July 16, 2013
Here is the so-called mystery: Americans are exercising more, but the national obesity rate keeps rising. How can that be? The answer is pretty obvious. As my personal trainer (the only person standing between me and a gut hanging over my belt) has told me many times, "It's all math -- the number of calories burned and the number of calories consumed. " According to data just published in the online journal Population Health Metrics, during the last 10 years, Americans have gotten more active in two-thirds of the nation's counties.
NEWS
November 3, 2013
If Coca-Cola really wants to prevent obesity in kids, as they say ( "Coca-Cola has taken steps to help reduce obesity," Oct. 27), they need to respect reality. The beverage giant spends two-thirds of its marketing budget inflating sales of its most sugary drinks. The reason: Advertising works. That's why they get blamed in the obesity epidemic. Coca-Cola does offer other choices - no- or low-calorie options we eagerly promote on our Better Beverage Finder (www.betterbeveragefinder.org/)
NEWS
March 29, 2011
The Sun editorial "Getting exercised over exercise" (March 28) makes some good points and then loses them in careless arguments that equate the need for healthy movement and activity with the war on obesity. There is no controversy about our need for more activity and the personal responsibility, along with civic choices, that are part of that. There is little question that doing away with recess and physical education are bad ideas with long term costs that far outweigh any initial savings.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Give me a break. The first lady can't even grow a vegetable garden or warn of the dangers of childhood obesity without some Republican creep getting their nose out of joint or complaining about the excesses of government. To these old eyes the first lady is a strikingly gorgeous woman. She certainly has a lot of credibility when it comes to dietary counsel because she practices what she preaches, and whatever she is doing works well for her. And we could all heed her admonition to eat less.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
NEWS
July 7, 2014
In Howard County, it's perfectly legal to consume the biggest, most gargantuan family-size bag of barbecue-flavored potato chips at one sitting and wash it down with a case of the most sugary soda ever made. Or, if that's not your taste, perhaps something more along the lines of the Homer Simpson diet with a thousand glazed doughnuts and a 64-ounce carton of chocolate syrup. County employees can partake of this artery-clogging, stomach-distending meal as often as they'd like. So can public school students.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Goudie | January 22, 2014
Childhood obesity is an epidemic in Baltimore, with the first signs seen in many children before they even reach traditional school age. Sixteen percent of the pre-kindergartners, ages 4 and 5, at one Northwest Baltimore public school were overweight, according to a 2013 survey of 150 students, and 12 percent of them were considered obese (above the 95th weight percentile for their ages and heights). Nearly half of the fourth-graders at that same school were overweight, and one in five of them was obese.
NEWS
By Oxiris Barbot | January 22, 2014
It is certainly not news that obesity is a growing health problem in this country and in the city of Baltimore. What is alarming, however, is that obesity has a disproportionately higher rate and impact on low-income, non-white populations in America. The city of Baltimore is no exception with a 36 percent obesity rate, including a 45.3 percent rate among African-Americans. Our goal in Baltimore is to decrease the number of adults who are obese by 15 percent by 2015. We have the opportunity to provide our communities with the tools and support they need to improve their health and slow this trend for the next generation.
NEWS
November 3, 2013
If Coca-Cola really wants to prevent obesity in kids, as they say ( "Coca-Cola has taken steps to help reduce obesity," Oct. 27), they need to respect reality. The beverage giant spends two-thirds of its marketing budget inflating sales of its most sugary drinks. The reason: Advertising works. That's why they get blamed in the obesity epidemic. Coca-Cola does offer other choices - no- or low-calorie options we eagerly promote on our Better Beverage Finder (www.betterbeveragefinder.org/)
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Unless I completely misinterpret this story ("Fatter folks, sicker bay," April 20), which is easy to do any time a "lefty" talks, it is a complete load of garbage! When the writer suggests that the health of the Chesapeake Bay is affected by the obesity of those who live near it, I have to respond that this is just another desperate attempt to lay blame on people, which usually is a precursor to another invasive law and a further erosion of freedom and liberty. He writes about a book he is reading by medical researchers and associates their findings with meanderings of his own mental deficiency and says, "It's intriguing to compare graphs these [Bay health]
NEWS
October 26, 2013
We agree with The Sun's editors that obesity is one of the country's most serious health issues ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). However, targeting soda alone, absent a focus on actions and efforts to achieve healthier diets and lifestyles, will not result in our collective goal of healthier communities. To manage weight, most experts agree the key is an active, healthy lifestyle. There are many factors that underpin these three words, but I will focus on two - a balanced, sensible diet and regular physical activity.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
We agree with The Sun's editors that obesity is one of the country's most serious health issues ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). However, targeting soda alone, absent a focus on actions and efforts to achieve healthier diets and lifestyles, will not result in our collective goal of healthier communities. To manage weight, most experts agree the key is an active, healthy lifestyle. There are many factors that underpin these three words, but I will focus on two - a balanced, sensible diet and regular physical activity.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
As The Sun recently noted, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report explaining that obesity rates in the nation have declined ("Tide may be turning on U.S. childhood obesity - CDC," Aug. 6). Hooray! But if you look beneath that shiny veneer here in Maryland, you'll find that the glass is really half full. It's true that our state's obesity rate in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and is now showing small declines.
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