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July 3, 1998
Charles Korvin,90, a Hungarian-born actor who made a career portraying handsome cads, died June 18 in New York. He played the romantic lead in three Merle Oberon films -- "This Love of Ours," "Temptation" and "Berlin Express." Blacklisted in the 1950s for refusing to cooperate with the House Committee on Un-American Activities, he didn't work again until 1965, when he made "Ship of Fools" with Vivien Leigh, Simone Signoret and Lee Marvin.Pub Date: 7/03/98
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Wolf Trap Opera's final production of the season arrives at just the right time: Benjamin Britten's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," a brilliantly crafted work from 1960 based on the Shakespeare play. Stage director Patrick Diamond's concept, based on his own experiences, "takes the idea of midsummer and dream literally," he says. "It's mostly about the idea of how we go outside during the summer and lose track of time, how the sun goes down, and it doesn't really register. That's the kind of world I feel these characters are in. " The opera has been given a contemporary look; Erhard Rom's scenic design includes fiber optics.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 19, 2001
Benjamin Britten, the 20th century's most compelling opera composer, once said that he "did not easily think in words, because words are not my medium." Yet when he decided to adapt Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," he managed to think very clearly not only in words but also in music; the text emerges as effortlessly for Britten as it once did for the Bard. The enchantment of the original play, cut roughly in half to form a libretto, remains intact, often intensified by a musical score that (to borrow from another Shakespeare play)
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2005
Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream as a fun show for audiences in 1595. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, staging the play outdoors in the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, proves it can still be fun 410 years later. It is a situation comedy about romantic mix-ups. Lysander and Demetrius are both in love with Hermia. She loves Lysander, but her father wants her to marry Demetrius. A young woman named Helena is mad for Demetrius, but he has no interest in her. Hermia appeals to the local duke, Theseus.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 16, 2003
What happens when two savvy playwrights from very different centuries collaborate? In the case of skilled modern farceur Ken Ludwig and Renaissance wonder William Shakespeare, the result is Shakespeare in Hollywood, a play that is at once poignant and funny, literary and farcical, sophisticated and silly, political and fanciful, high-brow and low-brow. A no-holds-barred take on the making of Max Reinhardt's 1935 movie of A Midsummer Night's Dream, the new comedy may be the best work yet by this Washington-based playwright whose Broadway successes - Lend Me a Tenor and Crazy for You - have been none too shabby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 5, 1994
In staging "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Cloisters Amphitheater as its inaugural production, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has chosen the Shakespearean play best suited to being performed outdoors on a summer night. And the fledgling theater company is taking full advantage of its open-air venue -- on the evening I attended, even a brief rain shower failed to interrupt the action on stage.But above and beyond the lovely, appropriate setting, the most interesting aspect of this solid production is that it isn't merely a light romp in the woods, as the play is often interpreted.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2005
Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream as a fun show for audiences in 1595. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, staging the play outdoors in the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, proves it can still be fun 410 years later. It is a situation comedy about romantic mix-ups. Lysander and Demetrius are both in love with Hermia. She loves Lysander, but her father wants her to marry Demetrius. A young woman named Helena is mad for Demetrius, but he has no interest in her. Hermia appeals to the local duke, Theseus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Wolf Trap Opera's final production of the season arrives at just the right time: Benjamin Britten's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," a brilliantly crafted work from 1960 based on the Shakespeare play. Stage director Patrick Diamond's concept, based on his own experiences, "takes the idea of midsummer and dream literally," he says. "It's mostly about the idea of how we go outside during the summer and lose track of time, how the sun goes down, and it doesn't really register. That's the kind of world I feel these characters are in. " The opera has been given a contemporary look; Erhard Rom's scenic design includes fiber optics.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 1997
With its quartet of amorous couples and woodland setting replete with fairies, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is not only one of Shakespeare's most lavish romantic comedies, but one that offers a wealth of opportunities for an imaginative director and designers.Center Stage's season-opening production takes full advantage and delivers a fanciful, visually lush interpretation that reinforces the theme of the mysteries and blindness of true love, whose course never does run smooth.The visual opulence begins with designer Tony Straiges' set, which resembles a gigantic, two-level gilded bird cage surrounded by topiaries that float up magically, as if in a Magritte painting, when Puck arrives.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 25, 2002
The Maryland Stage Company's production of Shakespeare's magical A Midsummer Night's Dream is a mixed bag of tricks. Love is a difficult and sometimes dark struggle in director Xerxes Mehta's interpretation. One of the leads is seriously miscast, and there's far too much yelling for this ethereal comedy to truly work its spell. But most of the acting is just fine, and Mehta uses some effective (if not especially original) double casting to reinforce one of the play's major themes - the notion that love is blind.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 16, 2003
What happens when two savvy playwrights from very different centuries collaborate? In the case of skilled modern farceur Ken Ludwig and Renaissance wonder William Shakespeare, the result is Shakespeare in Hollywood, a play that is at once poignant and funny, literary and farcical, sophisticated and silly, political and fanciful, high-brow and low-brow. A no-holds-barred take on the making of Max Reinhardt's 1935 movie of A Midsummer Night's Dream, the new comedy may be the best work yet by this Washington-based playwright whose Broadway successes - Lend Me a Tenor and Crazy for You - have been none too shabby.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 25, 2002
The Maryland Stage Company's production of Shakespeare's magical A Midsummer Night's Dream is a mixed bag of tricks. Love is a difficult and sometimes dark struggle in director Xerxes Mehta's interpretation. One of the leads is seriously miscast, and there's far too much yelling for this ethereal comedy to truly work its spell. But most of the acting is just fine, and Mehta uses some effective (if not especially original) double casting to reinforce one of the play's major themes - the notion that love is blind.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 19, 2001
Benjamin Britten, the 20th century's most compelling opera composer, once said that he "did not easily think in words, because words are not my medium." Yet when he decided to adapt Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," he managed to think very clearly not only in words but also in music; the text emerges as effortlessly for Britten as it once did for the Bard. The enchantment of the original play, cut roughly in half to form a libretto, remains intact, often intensified by a musical score that (to borrow from another Shakespeare play)
NEWS
July 3, 1998
Charles Korvin,90, a Hungarian-born actor who made a career portraying handsome cads, died June 18 in New York. He played the romantic lead in three Merle Oberon films -- "This Love of Ours," "Temptation" and "Berlin Express." Blacklisted in the 1950s for refusing to cooperate with the House Committee on Un-American Activities, he didn't work again until 1965, when he made "Ship of Fools" with Vivien Leigh, Simone Signoret and Lee Marvin.Pub Date: 7/03/98
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 1997
With its quartet of amorous couples and woodland setting replete with fairies, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is not only one of Shakespeare's most lavish romantic comedies, but one that offers a wealth of opportunities for an imaginative director and designers.Center Stage's season-opening production takes full advantage and delivers a fanciful, visually lush interpretation that reinforces the theme of the mysteries and blindness of true love, whose course never does run smooth.The visual opulence begins with designer Tony Straiges' set, which resembles a gigantic, two-level gilded bird cage surrounded by topiaries that float up magically, as if in a Magritte painting, when Puck arrives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 5, 1994
In staging "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Cloisters Amphitheater as its inaugural production, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has chosen the Shakespearean play best suited to being performed outdoors on a summer night. And the fledgling theater company is taking full advantage of its open-air venue -- on the evening I attended, even a brief rain shower failed to interrupt the action on stage.But above and beyond the lovely, appropriate setting, the most interesting aspect of this solid production is that it isn't merely a light romp in the woods, as the play is often interpreted.
NEWS
December 23, 2005
On December 21, 2005, EDITH BOTKIN RUBIN; devoted wife of the late Harold Rubin; beloved mother of Steven J. Rubin, Rhea Joyce Rubin and Abbie Kay Rubin; cherished sister of Albert Botkin of Niles, IL; loving grandmother of Hannah Irene Rubin Berman. She is also survived by her grand-dog Oberon X. Ben Kodiak. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, December 23, 12 Noon at Temple Sinai Synagogue, 3100 Military Road, N.W. Washington DC. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. box 17025 Baltimore, MD 21203.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1996
Don't look now, but fairies have been spotted on the north shore of the Severn River.Or, you could look closely and see they have been joined by nobles, star-crossed lovers, all manner of supernatural forest creatures and a hilarious thespian with a wondrous propensity for making a fool of himself.Of course, it's William Shakespeare's most colorful and delightful comedy, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" I'm referring to.And it will be presented by the Other Little Theatre at the Annapolis Naval Station Theater, 89 Bennion Road, at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays this week through May 4. A matinee will be given at 2 p.m. April 28.Paul Hussar plays the role of Oberon, ruler of the fairy kingdom.
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