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NEWS
May 22, 1992
Baltimore's 200-year-old monument to Christopher Columbus, the first of its kind in North America, is about to regain its status.Shoved into obscurity by the excitement over a new Columbus statue in Little Italy in 1984, the monument had been ignored in plans for this year's celebration of the 500th anniversary of the 1492 voyage of discovery.But no longer, says former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, general chairman of the Mayor's Columbus Day Parade. The obelisk, first erected in 1792 in the gardens of a then-Baltimore County estate, will regain the respect it once enjoyed, he vows.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
They are plebes no longer. It took two hours, 10 minutes and 13 seconds Tuesday for the freshman class at the U.S. Naval Academy to have one of its own knock a plebe's "dixie cup" hat from the top of the greased Herndon Monument and replace it with a midshipman's hat, symbolically morphing the group into 4th-class Mids. Andrew Craig, 19, of Tulsa, Okla., achieved the goal in the noisy and slippery event that drew between 800 and 1,000 plebes, officials said. Tradition holds that the student who caps the monument will be first in the class to reach the rank of admiral, though that has yet to happen.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 5, 2001
AKSUM, Ethiopia - It took dozens of elephants, winches and hundreds, if not thousands, of men to build the giant granite obelisks that dominate this village like skyscrapers. Two thousand years later, archaeologists marvel at the engineering skill of the ancient Ethiopians who carved and transported some of the largest pieces of stone ever quarried with no help from modern machinery. What might go down in history as an even greater feat is getting an old colonial power to return one of these prized structures.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
It's one of the Naval Academy's most enduring traditions: Hundreds of shirtless plebes mark the end of their first year by swarming a grease-slicked, 21-foot-obelisk, climbing over one another in a race to the top. Now, academy officials are asking: Is this safe? In a terse statement this week, academy officials said they will assemble a student committee to study changes to the Herndon Monument Climb. "Like many customs and traditions, they evolve, they change over time," said Cmdr.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Baltimore's 200-year-old monument to Christopher Columbus the first of its kind in North America, is about to regain its status. Shoved into obscurity by the excitement over a new Columbus statue in Little Italy in 1984, the monument had been ignored in plans for this year's celebration of the 500th anniversary of the 1492 voyage of discovery.But no longer, says former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro 3rd, general chairman of the Mayor's Columbus Day Parade. The obelisk, first erected in 1792 in the gardens of a then-Baltimore County estate, will regain the respect it once enjoyed, he vows.
NEWS
By Eric Lekus and Eric Lekus,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is the most recognizable structure in Washington, a 555-foot high obelisk almost devoid of decoration.The Washington Monument is about to become even more easily distinguished: Beginning sometime this winter, it will become a 555-foot high obelisk surrounded by scaffolding.Winter is when the National Park Service is scheduled to begin a three-year, $5 million repair effort that will be the most comprehensive overhaul of the monument since it opened to the public in 1888.And think of it not as the Washington Monument, but the Washington Monument-sponsored-by-Target, the department store chain.
NEWS
By ANDREW J. GLASS | July 9, 1996
MOSCOW -- In the early 1960s, the Kremlin spent a fortune to erect a 390-foot obelisk here. The monument, made of solid titantium, marks Soviet triumphs in space. In spirit, it reflects the grandiose themes so beloved by Vladimir Lenin, who believed that communism would spread out from this capital to encompass the whole world.Also boasting of Soviet glories, Lenin's successor, Joseph Stalin, built a huge fair grounds, on the same site where the space obelisk still soars into the Moscow sky. At the entrance to this vast complex of pavilions, statues and spouting water fountains is a giant triumphal arch, surmounted by the figures of a tractor driver and a woman collective farmer, gilded in gold.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Just before 11 a.m. yesterday, cheers erupted from a pile of several hundred scrambling, sweat-drenched midshipmen attempting to climb Herndon Monument at the Naval Academy. Placing his feet on the shoulders of a classmate below him, a midshipman finally reached the summit of the 21-foot obelisk - coated with 150 pounds of lard - and set an upperclassman's cap on its point, an academy rite of passage marking the end of the lowly plebe (freshman) year. It was cause for celebration, to be sure - but only for a moment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
They are plebes no longer. It took two hours, 10 minutes and 13 seconds Tuesday for the freshman class at the U.S. Naval Academy to have one of its own knock a plebe's "dixie cup" hat from the top of the greased Herndon Monument and replace it with a midshipman's hat, symbolically morphing the group into 4th-class Mids. Andrew Craig, 19, of Tulsa, Okla., achieved the goal in the noisy and slippery event that drew between 800 and 1,000 plebes, officials said. Tradition holds that the student who caps the monument will be first in the class to reach the rank of admiral, though that has yet to happen.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
It's one of the Naval Academy's most enduring traditions: Hundreds of shirtless plebes mark the end of their first year by swarming a grease-slicked, 21-foot-obelisk, climbing over one another in a race to the top. Now, academy officials are asking: Is this safe? In a terse statement this week, academy officials said they will assemble a student committee to study changes to the Herndon Monument Climb. "Like many customs and traditions, they evolve, they change over time," said Cmdr.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
Stocky mids at the base, tall ones in the middle, and on top - the scrawniest. That was the winning formula for the determined freshmen in the Naval Academy's Class of 2008, who yesterday scaled the Herndon Monument, an annual rite of passage that marks the end of plebe year, in excellent time. The class reached the top of the 21-foot, grease-slicked granite monument in an hour and 16 minutes - the fastest time since 1988, when it took 43 minutes. At 10:16 a.m., the wobbly tower of squirming bodies suddenly hoisted John Olsen, 19, toward the top of the obelisk.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Just before 11 a.m. yesterday, cheers erupted from a pile of several hundred scrambling, sweat-drenched midshipmen attempting to climb Herndon Monument at the Naval Academy. Placing his feet on the shoulders of a classmate below him, a midshipman finally reached the summit of the 21-foot obelisk - coated with 150 pounds of lard - and set an upperclassman's cap on its point, an academy rite of passage marking the end of the lowly plebe (freshman) year. It was cause for celebration, to be sure - but only for a moment.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2002
On a glorious spring day in 1976, as his classmates cheered from below, Dwight Crevelt clung to the top of a grease-slicked granite monument at the Naval Academy and tore a sailor's cap from the peak. This boded well. One of the academy's most enduring legends is that the freshman who climbs to the top of Herndon Monument is fated to be the first in his class to make admiral, the Navy's highest rank. It didn't work out that way. Crevelt's eyesight went from bad to worse, and he dropped out of the academy the next year.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 5, 2001
AKSUM, Ethiopia - It took dozens of elephants, winches and hundreds, if not thousands, of men to build the giant granite obelisks that dominate this village like skyscrapers. Two thousand years later, archaeologists marvel at the engineering skill of the ancient Ethiopians who carved and transported some of the largest pieces of stone ever quarried with no help from modern machinery. What might go down in history as an even greater feat is getting an old colonial power to return one of these prized structures.
NEWS
By Eric Lekus and Eric Lekus,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is the most recognizable structure in Washington, a 555-foot high obelisk almost devoid of decoration.The Washington Monument is about to become even more easily distinguished: Beginning sometime this winter, it will become a 555-foot high obelisk surrounded by scaffolding.Winter is when the National Park Service is scheduled to begin a three-year, $5 million repair effort that will be the most comprehensive overhaul of the monument since it opened to the public in 1888.And think of it not as the Washington Monument, but the Washington Monument-sponsored-by-Target, the department store chain.
NEWS
By ANDREW J. GLASS | July 9, 1996
MOSCOW -- In the early 1960s, the Kremlin spent a fortune to erect a 390-foot obelisk here. The monument, made of solid titantium, marks Soviet triumphs in space. In spirit, it reflects the grandiose themes so beloved by Vladimir Lenin, who believed that communism would spread out from this capital to encompass the whole world.Also boasting of Soviet glories, Lenin's successor, Joseph Stalin, built a huge fair grounds, on the same site where the space obelisk still soars into the Moscow sky. At the entrance to this vast complex of pavilions, statues and spouting water fountains is a giant triumphal arch, surmounted by the figures of a tractor driver and a woman collective farmer, gilded in gold.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2002
On a glorious spring day in 1976, as his classmates cheered from below, Dwight Crevelt clung to the top of a grease-slicked granite monument at the Naval Academy and tore a sailor's cap from the peak. This boded well. One of the academy's most enduring legends is that the freshman who climbs to the top of Herndon Monument is fated to be the first in his class to make admiral, the Navy's highest rank. It didn't work out that way. Crevelt's eyesight went from bad to worse, and he dropped out of the academy the next year.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2005
Stocky mids at the base, tall ones in the middle, and on top - the scrawniest. That was the winning formula for the determined freshmen in the Naval Academy's Class of 2008, who yesterday scaled the Herndon Monument, an annual rite of passage that marks the end of plebe year, in excellent time. The class reached the top of the 21-foot, grease-slicked granite monument in an hour and 16 minutes - the fastest time since 1988, when it took 43 minutes. At 10:16 a.m., the wobbly tower of squirming bodies suddenly hoisted John Olsen, 19, toward the top of the obelisk.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Baltimore's 200-year-old monument to Christopher Columbus the first of its kind in North America, is about to regain its status. Shoved into obscurity by the excitement over a new Columbus statue in Little Italy in 1984, the monument had been ignored in plans for this year's celebration of the 500th anniversary of the 1492 voyage of discovery.But no longer, says former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro 3rd, general chairman of the Mayor's Columbus Day Parade. The obelisk, first erected in 1792 in the gardens of a then-Baltimore County estate, will regain the respect it once enjoyed, he vows.
NEWS
May 22, 1992
Baltimore's 200-year-old monument to Christopher Columbus, the first of its kind in North America, is about to regain its status.Shoved into obscurity by the excitement over a new Columbus statue in Little Italy in 1984, the monument had been ignored in plans for this year's celebration of the 500th anniversary of the 1492 voyage of discovery.But no longer, says former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, general chairman of the Mayor's Columbus Day Parade. The obelisk, first erected in 1792 in the gardens of a then-Baltimore County estate, will regain the respect it once enjoyed, he vows.
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