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By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2004
In ceremonies across the country this week, robed medical school graduates will rise, degrees in hand, and perform their first act as physicians and their last as students. They will swear an oath with ties to ancient times, one generally credited to Hippocrates. The ritual is an eerie chant of principles that Dr. William Henrich, the University of Maryland's chairman of internal medicine, describes as a resonating link with all physicians: those long since gone, the robed young doctors standing shoulder to shoulder in the ceremonies of the present, the healers yet to come.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 14, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - She spoke with authority. That was my first impression of National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice as she faced the commission investigating how 9/11 happened and what might be done to prevent future attacks on American soil. Mere mortals would have melted during the three hours of sometimes-intense questioning, but Ms. Rice didn't even break a sweat. One might have thought she was engaging in after-dinner conversation and not the high drama that persuaded the three broadcast networks to interrupt the banalities they usually carry in the morning for something - and someone - of substance.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Joe Mathews and Peter Nicholas and Joe Mathews,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2003
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger took the oath as California's 38th governor yesterday, vowing to upend the political culture and humble the special interests through decisive action that would amount to the "Miracle of Sacramento." The audience of 7,500 invited guests, including thousands standing and watching on big-screen televisions, interrupted Schwarzenegger for applause 24 times during the course of his 12-minute inaugural speech, with the loudest ovation coming when he renewed his promise to roll back the state's car tax. Shortly after the 45-minute ceremony on the west steps of the Capitol, the new governor delivered on that promise, issuing Executive Order 1, which repealed the $4 billion increase that had been approved by the man he replaced - Gray Davis.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 2, 2003
LAST WEEK this column ended with a recollection of the fable about George Washington cutting down his father's cherry tree with a new hatchet, but not being able to lie to his father about it. "I cannot tell a lie," the father of our nation told his father. One of the first president's nicknames was "Honest George." Forty-two presidents later, we have yet another George in the White House. I would not call him "Honest George." And this isn't about cherry trees. It's about going to war in Iraq for reasons that were not true, those reasons being Saddam Hussein's possession of weapons of mass destruction and his ties to al-Qaida and implicitly the Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The United States handed over command of an area of southern Iraq to Poland's military yesterday, the incomplete transfer serving as a somewhat flawed model for the multinational cooperation the United States hopes to amplify. The degree to which continuing security problems afflict U.S. plans was underscored by the fact that the Marines are holding on to Najaf, the major religious seat within the area, for at least two weeks, to ensure the city remains stable. A car bomb there Friday killed 95 people, including one of the city's most revered clerics.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2003
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - After 18 months of uncertainty and political drama, Argentina bore witness to something refreshing yesterday - an elected president, taking the oath of office amid great pomp and ceremony before an assembly of international leaders. Unlike the four men who preceded him, Nestor Kirchner did not become president in the middle of the night, or as part of a national emergency, or with chunks of this cosmopolitan city occupied by riot police. "Our past is full of failures, pain, confrontations, [and]
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2003
Calling him a "cop's cop," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. administered the oath of office yesterday to Col. Edward T. Norris, the 61st superintendent of the Maryland State Police. "What do I mean by cop's cop? He's someone who understands what cops do and stands by them," Ehrlich said. "He's aggressive. I like that. He's confident. He's intelligent. And he's loyal. This is a great day for our administration. It's a great day for the state of Maryland. Ehrlich said he was somewhat surprised to be swearing in Norris, because he hadn't been sure Norris would be willing to give up his job as police commissioner in Baltimore to take the state job. But the governor said he was glad to learn Norris wanted the challenge because the administration has laid out ambitious goals for the state police in providing security against terrorists.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
When Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. takes an oath today to become Maryland's 60th governor, the longest stretch of single-party executive rule in state history will end in an instant. The swearing-in ceremony, scheduled for noon inside the stately Senate chambers in the State House and repeated minutes later outside, will immediately confer upon the Timonium Republican more power than he has ever held. Historians and political scientists agree that Maryland's governor wields enormous authority - almost single-handedly crafting a $22 billion budget and handing out thousands of patronage jobs.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2002
The face of Anne Arundel's government took on a new look yesterday as the seven County Council members - four incumbents and three newcomers - were sworn into office in an emotional ceremony, and County Executive Janet S. Owens quietly prepared for potential changes in her executive Cabinet. Owens, a Democrat from Millersville who was inaugurated for her second term Sunday, asked her Cabinet members to submit letters of resignation to Chief Administrative Officer John M. Brusnighan by tomorrow.
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