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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | September 24, 2007
Carol Oppenheimer describes the garden in front of the old courthouse building in Towson as "magical," so visually arresting that the first time she saw it she nearly caused a car accident swerving to see it closer. To Elyssa Baxter, it's the antithesis of the grass and concrete expanses that ordinarily fill public outdoor spaces. And it reminds Holly Sefter of the lush public squares that have made Savannah, Ga., famous. But a consultant is recommending that changes be made to the favorite spot of many Towson gardeners, residents and county workers - just a year after a team of planners recommended that the garden be plowed over.
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NEWS
July 29, 2007
It is fitting that a swing beneath an arbor occupies a prominent place in Hanna's cottage garden. Considering all the work he did to transform his small back yard into a flowering oasis, this 51-year-old manager for Verizon deserves a front-row seat from which to admire his handiwork. You can read about his efforts tomorrow at baltimoresun.com/gardener
NEWS
July 5, 2007
The KIPP Harbor Academy in Anne Arundel County has been on a roller coaster ride. Two weeks ago, the principal announced that the 2-year-old school would have to close for lack of space. Then County Executive John R. Leopold and schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell tried to intervene, helping to prompt a 3-2 vote last week by the school's board to keep the school open. But any space solutions are far from settled, and the school's continued existence is now also threatened by a lack of qualified teachers.
NEWS
By Susan GVOZDAS and Susan GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | April 8, 2007
Cheryl King's two daughters reacted differently two years ago when they learned that their mother had lymphoma. Ali, then 8, lashed out in anger. Maddie, 6, clung to her mother at every opportunity. King, an Annapolis woman who struggled with the diagnosis herself, did not know where to turn. "I didn't know how to make it better for them," said King, who has been in remission for the past year. An Annapolis plastic surgeon is trying to create an oasis of support and advice for cancer patients such as King and their families.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | February 18, 2007
BOWIE -- Fourteen months after the stream stopped flowing through his pasture and his well dried up, farmer Joseph Mills is still watering his cattle with the help of a fire hose hooked up to a hydrant beyond his fence line. Oasis Farms, the Mills family's patch of green on the outskirts of booming Bowie, is surrounded on three sides by a sprawling planned community of 1,800 homes, stores and offices. General Growth Properties, the developer, says on the Fairwood community's Web site that "careful attention has been paid to the ecology of the land" in preparing it for construction.
NEWS
By Sun photographer | October 30, 2006
Doris Waldon has become something of a fixture around Harborplace at Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Waldon, who has been homeless for the past two years, has made a habit of feeding the pigeons that congregate around the downtown tourist destination. She says the area serves as an emotional oasis and a temporary escape from the burden of her circumstances.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
A blue-painted steel sign, carved with cut-out angels and a giant yellow sunflower on its top, frames a flower garden in a corner once called a trash triangle. Planted in clean lines, flowers spell out the word "LOVE" on an adjoining lawn where decayed rowhouses once stood. The new azure sign and an artistic red metalwork fence frame an oasis that has blossomed over several years in East Baltimore's McElderry Park neighborhood - a contrast to the drug troubles and violence on nearby streets.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,[Sun Reporter ] | September 3, 2006
The sight and sound of moving water can be such a balm to the human spirit that it is a wonder, in these troubled times, that we all do not move beside the nearest stream. It is a testament to human ingenuity that homeowners have found ways to bring that moving water to them. Manmade ponds, streams, waterfalls and fountains have become as common as birdbaths. There are container water gardens with a handful of papyrus and a couple of goldfish that are perfect for a condominium balcony.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 9, 2006
In the middle of Baltimore's hottest summer in years, I've been craving lemonade. I want the perfect summer lemonade, made with fresh-squeezed lemons while I watch. It must have a delicate balance of sweet and thirst-quenching sour. And it shouldn't cost an arm and a leg. This could be a possible trend, I decided, or at least a trendlet: A fresh-squeezed lemonade is made of natural ingredients, after all, and it has retro appeal - all part of what America likes in 2006. Surely someone in this town is taking it a step further and making watermelon lemonade or serving it in a martini glass.
NEWS
July 23, 2006
Poverty is not just costly, it's downright unhealthy. This year, University of Michigan researchers found that poor minority areas in Baltimore and Baltimore County have far fewer healthy food options than more-affluent communities. Relatively few large supermarkets, with their huge inventories of fresh fruit and vegetables, were located in predominantly black neighborhoods compared with wealthier white areas. And this turns out to be more than just an inconvenience. In a report released this past week, a researcher looked at what was termed the "food deserts" of Chicago's South and West Sides to explore their impact on residents' health.
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