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Nutrient Pollution

FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
The state has made a rare binding pledge to offset whatever pollution it may cause by depositing the muck it dredges from Baltimore harbor in a cove south of downtown. Bowing to concerns raised by environmentalists, the state Department of the Environment is requiring the Maryland Port Administration to limit or make up for the nitrogen and phosphorus expected to drain back into the Patapsco River from the dredged material to be placed in Masonville Cove. The port administration has spent $153 million to clean up trash and debris in the cove area and build an environmental education center there.
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NEWS
June 16, 2001
Smart Growth can help state cut nutrient pollution The Sun's article about the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant was wrong to state that "Smart Growth's success could add to nitrogen problems in the Chesapeake Bay" ("Control of growth vs. harm to environment," June 3). Maryland's sewage-treatment plants do face increased discharges because of population growth, but the Chesapeake Bay Foundation believes Smart Growth will play a critical role in solving, rather than exacerbating, the discharge problem.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
A new study shows some Chesapeake Bay rivers have gotten cleaner over the past three decades, while others are getting worse. The analysis, released Wednesday by the U.S. Geological Survey, suggests costly upgrades of sewage plants have helped, scientists say, but it raises questions about the effectiveness of efforts to date to curb polluted runoff, particularly from farms on Maryland's Eastern Shore. "We're going in the wrong direction in some places, and the right direction in others," said William Dennison, vice president for science applications of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | September 24, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening is reintroducing himself to Marylanders with a new, personalized television commercial that talks of his humble beginnings and his accomplishments in office.What the ad says: The 30-second spot that began running yesterday shows a different side of the pragmatic, professorial Democratic incumbent. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend introduces Glendening as a private man who "doesn't talk much about himself," who grew up in poverty and found "a lifeline" through education.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
Also in yesterday's Maryland section, a figure in an article about the amount of nitrogen projected to be washed into Chesapeake Bay in the next 3 1/2 years was incorrect. The correct estimate is 300 million pounds.The Sun regrets the error.Despite making progress in restoring Chesapeake Bay, the multistate cleanup effort is falling short of its major goal of reducing the bay's nutrient pollution 40 percent by 2000.Preliminary projections presented yesterday at a bay cleanup meeting show that Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and the District of Columbia appear likely to meet their goal of reducing phosphorus, one of two key nutrients fouling the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Rural legislators and agriculture industry representatives have tentatively agreed to a compromise under which they would accept mandatory controls on farm nutrient pollution, a powerful House committee chairman said yesterday.Del. Ronald A. Guns, a Cecil County Democrat and a leading advocate for farm interests, said the emerging compromise would give farmers more time to comply than under Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal for fighting outbreaks of toxic Pfiesteria in Maryland waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
Nine in 10 residents of the Chesapeake region support the bay cleanup, and six of 10 want a stronger effort, a federally funded poll shows.The survey, released Thursday, also shows that the public tends to blame industry for the bay's woes, rather than farms and air pollution -- causes cited by many experts.Two-thirds of the 2,004 people interviewed ranked chemicals as more harmful to the Chesapeake than nutrients, even though nutrient pollution has been the principal target of the cleanup.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | January 30, 1993
Here is a recipe, for an elegant poultry dish, from Kay and Sid Richardson of near Willards, Md. It goes nicely with a toast to the health of Chesapeake Bay:One part straw; one part dead, rotting chicken carcass; two parts chickenhouse litter (manure and sawdust), well mixed and aged a few weeks.Moisten with just a sprinkle of water, and build a 4-foot pile of the above ingredients in alternating layers.Let the pile cook for several weeks -- it will reach an internal temperature of 150 degrees -- and turn occasionally.
NEWS
January 5, 1998
Bosnian murderers must be punishedFifteen hundred children were murdered during the war in Bosnia, shot dead by snipers hidden in the densely forested hills looking down on Sarajevo.It is said you never feel it. Just a dull impact and then nothing. But how do we know this?These deaths weren't accidental and this wasn't war. This was murder, pure and simple. And those who pulled the triggers and those who gave the orders should be brought to justice.It's too soon for the U.S. to pull out. Fifteen hundred small bodies demand that we stay.
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