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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 23, 2013
For decades in Maryland many things have been done in the name of saving the Chesapeake Bay, but the degree to which tangible progress has been made is something of a disappointment. To be sure, there have been some successes. The mid-1980s ban on catching rockfish in an effort to allow the Chesapeake stock of the state fish to make a recovery has resulted in reasonably healthy stocks of the fish being available for watermen and sport anglers alike these days. Substantially stricter regulation of blue crab harvests seem to have helped avert a rockfish-like population collapse in Maryland's signature table fare.
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NEWS
June 16, 2001
Smart Growth can help state cut nutrient pollution The Sun's article about the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant was wrong to state that "Smart Growth's success could add to nitrogen problems in the Chesapeake Bay" ("Control of growth vs. harm to environment," June 3). Maryland's sewage-treatment plants do face increased discharges because of population growth, but the Chesapeake Bay Foundation believes Smart Growth will play a critical role in solving, rather than exacerbating, the discharge problem.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | September 24, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening is reintroducing himself to Marylanders with a new, personalized television commercial that talks of his humble beginnings and his accomplishments in office.What the ad says: The 30-second spot that began running yesterday shows a different side of the pragmatic, professorial Democratic incumbent. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend introduces Glendening as a private man who "doesn't talk much about himself," who grew up in poverty and found "a lifeline" through education.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | October 17, 1998
Maryland's U.S. senators and a congressman laud Gov. Parris N. Glendening in a new television commercial airing in Western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, courtesy of the state's Democratic Party.What the ad says: Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes introduces Glendening as a decisive leader who moved to protect the Chesapeake Bay after last year's outbreak of a fish-killing microbe. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski calls the Democratic governor "a fighter" who created the "toughest standards in the nation" for public schools, and Rep. Albert R. Wynn of Prince George's County says the state gained 150,000 jobs during Glendening's tenure.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 3, 2012
Two Washington-based environmental groups filed suit Wednesday to block pollution trading in the Chesapeake Bay, contending the market-based cleanup program violates the federal Clean Water Act and will undermine rather than help efforts to restore the ailing estuary. Food & Water Watch and Friends of the Earth contend in the joint filing that the Environmental Protection Agency acted unlawfully in authorizing Maryland and other bay watershed states to set up programs for buying and selling nutrient "credits" as part of the "pollution diet" that the federal agency has imposed for restoring the Chesapeake's water quality.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Rural legislators and agriculture industry representatives have tentatively agreed to a compromise under which they would accept mandatory controls on farm nutrient pollution, a powerful House committee chairman said yesterday.Del. Ronald A. Guns, a Cecil County Democrat and a leading advocate for farm interests, said the emerging compromise would give farmers more time to comply than under Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal for fighting outbreaks of toxic Pfiesteria in Maryland waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
Nine in 10 residents of the Chesapeake region support the bay cleanup, and six of 10 want a stronger effort, a federally funded poll shows.The survey, released Thursday, also shows that the public tends to blame industry for the bay's woes, rather than farms and air pollution -- causes cited by many experts.Two-thirds of the 2,004 people interviewed ranked chemicals as more harmful to the Chesapeake than nutrients, even though nutrient pollution has been the principal target of the cleanup.
NEWS
January 5, 1998
Bosnian murderers must be punishedFifteen hundred children were murdered during the war in Bosnia, shot dead by snipers hidden in the densely forested hills looking down on Sarajevo.It is said you never feel it. Just a dull impact and then nothing. But how do we know this?These deaths weren't accidental and this wasn't war. This was murder, pure and simple. And those who pulled the triggers and those who gave the orders should be brought to justice.It's too soon for the U.S. to pull out. Fifteen hundred small bodies demand that we stay.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - State and federal officials pledged yesterday to redouble their efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay but declined to set a new target date for when they plan to do it. Instead, the officials - including the governors of Maryland and Virginia - agreed to meet again in the spring to adopt an ultimate deadline. And they promised to lay out detailed, two-year cleanup plans intended to put more pressure on elected leaders such as themselves to make progress in the 25-year restoration effort that has left the bay's water quality as poor now as it was when the campaign began.
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