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Nutrient Pollution

NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | September 24, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening is reintroducing himself to Marylanders with a new, personalized television commercial that talks of his humble beginnings and his accomplishments in office.What the ad says: The 30-second spot that began running yesterday shows a different side of the pragmatic, professorial Democratic incumbent. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend introduces Glendening as a private man who "doesn't talk much about himself," who grew up in poverty and found "a lifeline" through education.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | October 17, 1998
Maryland's U.S. senators and a congressman laud Gov. Parris N. Glendening in a new television commercial airing in Western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, courtesy of the state's Democratic Party.What the ad says: Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes introduces Glendening as a decisive leader who moved to protect the Chesapeake Bay after last year's outbreak of a fish-killing microbe. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski calls the Democratic governor "a fighter" who created the "toughest standards in the nation" for public schools, and Rep. Albert R. Wynn of Prince George's County says the state gained 150,000 jobs during Glendening's tenure.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Rural legislators and agriculture industry representatives have tentatively agreed to a compromise under which they would accept mandatory controls on farm nutrient pollution, a powerful House committee chairman said yesterday.Del. Ronald A. Guns, a Cecil County Democrat and a leading advocate for farm interests, said the emerging compromise would give farmers more time to comply than under Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal for fighting outbreaks of toxic Pfiesteria in Maryland waters.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
Nine in 10 residents of the Chesapeake region support the bay cleanup, and six of 10 want a stronger effort, a federally funded poll shows.The survey, released Thursday, also shows that the public tends to blame industry for the bay's woes, rather than farms and air pollution -- causes cited by many experts.Two-thirds of the 2,004 people interviewed ranked chemicals as more harmful to the Chesapeake than nutrients, even though nutrient pollution has been the principal target of the cleanup.
NEWS
January 5, 1998
Bosnian murderers must be punishedFifteen hundred children were murdered during the war in Bosnia, shot dead by snipers hidden in the densely forested hills looking down on Sarajevo.It is said you never feel it. Just a dull impact and then nothing. But how do we know this?These deaths weren't accidental and this wasn't war. This was murder, pure and simple. And those who pulled the triggers and those who gave the orders should be brought to justice.It's too soon for the U.S. to pull out. Fifteen hundred small bodies demand that we stay.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - State and federal officials pledged yesterday to redouble their efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay but declined to set a new target date for when they plan to do it. Instead, the officials - including the governors of Maryland and Virginia - agreed to meet again in the spring to adopt an ultimate deadline. And they promised to lay out detailed, two-year cleanup plans intended to put more pressure on elected leaders such as themselves to make progress in the 25-year restoration effort that has left the bay's water quality as poor now as it was when the campaign began.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
The effort to restore Chesapeake Bay still has a long way to go, but Maryland officials say they already see signs of recovery in the rivers that feed the ailing estuary.New data from long-term monitoring indicate that the Patuxent River, one of the Chesapeake's major tributaries, is getting cleaner, according to scientists with the Maryland Department of the Environment.In the past five years, there has been a dramatic drop in the river's levels of phosphorus, one of two nutrients blamed for choking off bay grasses and fish.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Most rivers that feed into the Chesapeake Bay are running clearer, but the bay overall is a long way from being restored to the natural vitality it once had, Maryland's congressional delegation learned yesterday.While water clarity, underwater grasses and some fish stocks have rebounded -- dramatically in the case of striped bass -- speakers at a Capitol Hill briefing said the bay remains ecologically degraded -- with oysters, shad and sturgeon still scarce and with troubling indications of subtle damage from low-level toxic pollution.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
Despite making progress in restoring Chesapeake Bay, the multistate cleanup effort is falling short of its major goal of reducing the bay's nutrient pollution 40 percent by 2000.Preliminary projections presented yesterday at a bay cleanup meeting show that Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and the District of Columbia appear likely to meet their goal of reducing phosphorus, one of two key nutrients fouling the Chesapeake.But unless the cleanup pace quickens dramatically, the projections show that current efforts to reduce the other nutrient, nitrogen, will fall 28 percent short of the goal set a decade ago.Officials have warned for some time that the cleanup campaign may not achieve the 40 percent reduction in nutrient pollution by the deadline, which is just 3 1/2 years away.
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