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By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
EASTON -- The state medical examiner has found traces of morphine in the remains of a 91-year-old Eastern Shore woman whose body was exhumed last week to determine whether she was given a lethal dose of a powerful painkiller at a Worcester County nursing home.According to a preliminary autopsy report released by the medical examiner's office in Baltimore and made public yesterday, toxicological tests revealed an undisclosed level of the drug in tissue samples taken from the body of Maidie Lang Shay.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings on Tuesday called on federal health officials to reevaluate how they grade nursing homes in response to reports that some facilities are gaming the system. In a letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Baltimore lawmaker and top-ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform requested a briefing on the issue next month. Cummings wrote he is particularly concerned the federal agency grades the homes in large part on self-reported metrics.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Caitlin Francke and Erin Texeira and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
An elderly man living at a local nursing home had bedsores and overgrown nails when he was brought in to Howard County General Hospital late last week, prompting an emergency room nurse to report suspected physical neglect to police.As a result of the police report, state officials say, they plan to investigate the care of Vernon Brown, 75, at the Lorien Nursing Home & Rehabilitation Center in Columbia's Hickory Ridge village.But the hospital already has determined that the elderly man did not suffer from any maltreatment, said Victor Broccolino, the hospital's president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gayle Hafner, a senior staff attorney of the Maryland Disability Law Center and a co-founder of Medicaid Matters Maryland who was an outspoken advocate for those with disabilities, died March 22 of a heart attack during an operation at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 60. "A premier civil rights attorney, Ms. Hafner sounded a voice for children in foster care and people with disabilities," said Lauren Young, director of litigation for the Maryland Disability Law Center.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 1997
Surveys find that most people would rather continue living at home than go to a nursing home. But the aversion to such a facility is so strong that a new study of seriously ill people in hospitals found that 30 percent of those surveyed said they would rather die than live permanently in a nursing home.The study was the first to ask seriously ill patients to state a preference for either living in a nursing home or dying. The findings come from the Support study, the largest investigation in the United States of decision-making at the end of life.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | April 6, 1998
I GOT A letter from a familiar address -- Niagara Falls, N.Y., the place where I grew up. The question it asked could have come from anywhere today. "A financial planner thinks I should buy a tax-deferred variable annuity. What do you think?"Salespeople are selling annuities to anyone who breathes. The reason is simple. They earn big commissions, in the 5 percent to 7 percent range.You don't notice this commission because it's not deducted up front. In fact, the annuity brochure may boast, "No initial sales charge."
NEWS
By Mary B. Moorhead and Mary B. Moorhead,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 19, 1999
Do you wonder what it would be like if your doctor had chosen to be specifically trained in geriatrics, felt proud to work with seniors and gave you the very best attention, respect and treatment? Can you imagine a hospital just for seniors? And what if this care were free or at minimal cost?The Institute of Geriatrics at the University of Montreal, Canada, has it all, which I discovered when I spent a day touring the facility. The institute is a teaching center, international interdisciplinary research center and a multicare hospital, all under one roof.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2010
Thousands of low-income nursing home patients in Maryland will have millions in old debts wiped out now that the state has settled a years-long case involving Medicaid payments. Much of the $16 million settlement will go directly to nursing homes that had not received payments from those patients. "We're starting to send checks to nursing homes now," said Cyril V. Smith, a lawyer for Zuckerman Spaeder LLP who represented the 12,000 Maryland patients who owed the money to about 160 nursing homes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Katherine Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
With Baltimore headed for a second straight day of triple-digit temperatures, health authorities ordered that all residents be moved from a Baltimore nursing home plagued with air conditioning problems. The 150 residents of Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on West Franklin Street are being transported to new locations, said David Paulson, communications director for Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. About 40 residents were moved Tuesday — after a resident called 911 to report stifling temperatures — but conditions did not improve markedly, so officials called for the broader relocation in the pre-dawn hours Wednesday.
NEWS
By Helen A. Monico | October 3, 1990
AS I AM NOW approaching the twilight time of life, I cannot help but wonder if I will ever be a resident in a nursing home. The people who live in nursing homes seem to be either aged, incurable convalescents, or the mentally ill and disabled, dependent on constant custodial care. Perhaps there are a few who were discarded by their families. I shudder when I think about living in a house of strangers.I live close to a nursing home and am familiar with what goes on there. Sitting in my kitchen I have often heard strange sounds coming from the rooms.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Marianna T. Earp, a retired music appreciation teacher, died of dementia Sunday at Maryland Masonic Home in Cockeysville. The Towson resident was 82. Born Marianna T. Markowski in the Baltic section of Poland, she was the daughter of Walter and Michelina Markowski. During World War II, she, her parents and siblings were sent to forced labor camps, including one near Stuttgart, by the Nazi German occupiers, family members said. After the war, Mrs. Earp was placed in a displaced persons camp.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
Annie Monroe got in a quick workout at the FutureCare Irvington nursing home on a recent afternoon. But the 87-year-old great-grandmother doesn't live there. She was sent by a hospital in December for rehabilitation after suffering an infection. While the nursing home counts her as filling one of 40 rehab beds at the wooded campus outside of Catonsville, her home is in Baltimore. Monroe represents a trend in health care in Maryland, and across the country, to ensure that as much care as possible is administered outside of costly hospital wards.
NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
EXPLORE
rbenjes@theaegis.com | March 27, 2013
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, March 28, 1963: The Harford Convalescing Home in Kalmia suffered a blaze that caused approximately $10,000 in damage 50 years ago this week. Twenty-six patients had to be evacuated to homes on the opposite side of Forge Hill Road until the fire could be brought under control. The fire swept through the rear building and damaged two others before being brought under control an hour later. Eleven fire trucks and eight ambulances arrived on the scene.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
In 2011, I spent six months in hospitals and nursing homes recovering from a bacterial infection called C-Difficile that I caught after surgery ("Nightmare bacteria," March 8). It is easily passed from patient to patient. While in the nursing homes I noticed a lack of the kind of proper care that would have prevented this potentially fatal illness. When I was admitted, not only was I placed in a semi-private room, exposing the other patient, I was given a remote control that had dried feces and blood on it. I reported it, but I'm sure this kind of thing happens constantly.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
When an occupational therapist walked through the home of 70-year-old Carol Glover two years ago, she immediately noticed safety hazards. Scatter rugs throughout the single-family home in Ednor Gardens left Glover, who has balance problems, vulnerable to tripping. She held onto the wall when she washed her feet in the bathtub, also leaving her open to slipping and falling. And because there was no ramp in her front yard, Glover dragged her walker up a grassy hill. But, thanks to a Johns Hopkins School of Nursing program, contractors fixed the hazards and Glover's home is now a safer place.
NEWS
By Kate Smith and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
With Baltimore sweating through a second straight day of triple-digit temperatures, state officials ordered the Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center to relocate all 150 patients because of problems with its air- conditioning system and began a comprehensive investigation of the facility. Throughout the day, residents in wheelchairs and on stretchers were loaded into vans and ambulances, as the West Franklin Street nursing home — where temperatures had climbed as high as 93 amid this week's heat wave — was gradually emptied.
NEWS
By Joe DeMattos | November 7, 2012
Many people think of nursing homes as places to go to die. But here in Maryland, skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers are in fact places people go to live. They are a big part of the solution to the state's health care challenges, providing quality and cost-effective transitional, rehab, long-term and high-acuity care to those in need. With the impending implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Maryland, we have an opportunity to identify and pilot ways in which Maryland's skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers can be essential to providing expanded care to people and families in need and deploying centerā€based resources into the community for public health challenges.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
A man was shot in the leg in the 500 block of W. Franklin Street, according to the Baltimore Police Twitter account. The shooting appeared to have happened in an alley by the Harborside Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in the Seton Hill neighborhood, but no other information about the incident was immediately available. The shooting took place opposite Select Lounge where officers shot and killed a plainclothes policeman last year. A bouncer at the bar said the lounge was not connected to the shooting Thursday.
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