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By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Dr. Lorenz E. Zimmerman, the founder of modern ophthalmic pathology, who spent his nearly 60-year career studying diseases of the eye, died March 16 of complications from an infection at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 92. His wife of 53 years, Anastasia U. Zimmerman, a registered nurse who had served as a major with the Army Nurse Corps, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure, also at Blakehurst. She was 89. "Without a doubt, Dr. Zimmerman was the most influential eye pathologist in the last 150 years.
EXPLORE
rbenjes@theaegis.com | March 27, 2013
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, March 28, 1963: The Harford Convalescing Home in Kalmia suffered a blaze that caused approximately $10,000 in damage 50 years ago this week. Twenty-six patients had to be evacuated to homes on the opposite side of Forge Hill Road until the fire could be brought under control. The fire swept through the rear building and damaged two others before being brought under control an hour later. Eleven fire trucks and eight ambulances arrived on the scene.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Legislation to legalize medical marijuana passed the House of Delegates Monday, sending the measure to the Senate. The bill would allow marijuana to be distributed through academic research centers by doctors and nurses. Similar measures have failed in previous years, but this year Gov. Martin O'Malley dropped his opposition and backed the proposal. Currently, 18 other states and the District of Columbia allows for the use of marijuana for medical purposes. The bill's sponsor, Del. Dan Morhaim, a physician and a Baltimore Democrat, has described Maryland's potential program as the tightest and most controlled of any in the country.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
In 2011, I spent six months in hospitals and nursing homes recovering from a bacterial infection called C-Difficile that I caught after surgery ("Nightmare bacteria," March 8). It is easily passed from patient to patient. While in the nursing homes I noticed a lack of the kind of proper care that would have prevented this potentially fatal illness. When I was admitted, not only was I placed in a semi-private room, exposing the other patient, I was given a remote control that had dried feces and blood on it. I reported it, but I'm sure this kind of thing happens constantly.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
Moira Mattingly had only been pregnant for about 24 weeks - still plenty of time, she thought, to pick a name for her daughter. So when she went to the hospital with some discomfort - small pains coming every seven minutes - the news that she was going into labor was alarming. The baby's lungs weren't fully formed, her skin barely so. Mattingly was also confronting sobering statistics: Babies born before 26 weeks, called micropreemies, can easily die and have a high chance of lifelong medical problems like cerebral palsy and blindness.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
The family of longtime Orioles umpires attendant Ernie Tyler is suing a Baltimore nursing home, claiming that a doctor at the facility cut off life-sustaining care to Tyler without authorization. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Baltimore Circuit Court, alleges that a day after Tyler checked into Genesis ElderCare Long Green Center in February 2011, his attending physician, Kenneth Lindyberg, "terminated necessary medical care, including antibiotics, blood products, medical tests, and medications without Mr. Tyler's permission and without the knowledge or permission of his family.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to make it easier for veterans and their spouses to work in Maryland received warm reviews Tuesday from lawmakers and the Defense Department, but nurses suggested it could leave patients in the hands of unqualified workers. Testifying on behalf of the Veterans Full Employment Act, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown said easing the transition into the civilian workforce is part of a "sacred obligation" society has to veterans. A Department of Defense official praised the plan as among the most comprehensive in the nation, while Del. Susan W. Krebs, a Carroll County Republican, called it "probably one of the best bills we're going to pass this year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Anne G. Karlsen, a registered nurse who had worked for the Baltimore County Health Department, died Jan. 25 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 86. Anne Bradford Grafflin was born in Baltimore and spent her early years on Wilson Street in Bolton Hill, before moving in 1934 to the Dixon Hill neighborhood in Mount Washington. After graduating from Western High School in 1945, she attended Baltimore Business College and later that year went to work as a mail sorter in the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's downtown freight office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Rosalie A. "Rosie" Fonner, a registered nurse who had worked for several decades in the mother-baby unit at University of Maryland Medical Center, where she relished her role as an advocate, died Feb. 3 of cancer at her Halethorpe home. She was 62. "Rosie was an incredible advocate for moms who were disadvantaged by addiction or their social situation. She would encourage them that they could be good moms," said the Rev. David Harness, a Church of God pastor who is one of the medical center's chaplains.
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