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By Jaye Dansicker | November 2, 1995
I PASSED A NUN on the beltway the other day. I was driving, but she wasn't.She was standing alongside her car on the beltway shoulder. Her car, a plain, economical type, of course, had a seriously immobilized look to it: It was sitting cock-eyed on the side of the road, its front end down a little bit in a ditch.She was just standing there, in her plain, economical type of civilian dress, beside the car's back left end. She could have been just about anyone's grandmother, broken down there, on the side of the road -- except for one thing.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Ruth E. Eger, the former executive director of the Joseph Richey Hospice who lectured widely on death and dying, died June 9 of pneumonia at Saint Agnes Hospital. She had just celebrated her 80th birthday. "Ruth was the most spirited and positive-thinking person. No problem was so big that we couldn't grow and learn from it, and she found that in everybody," said Catherine M. Frome, who was named clinical director of the Joseph Richey Hospice in April. "She turned Joseph Richey Hospice around and made its finances viable in order to care for the underserved in Baltimore," said Ms. Frome.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 9, 2012
- Let's talk about the other speech. No, not Bill Clinton's 48-minute stemwinder to the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night that was so mesmerizing even Republicans praised it. Instead, let's offer a little nod of affirmation for Sister Simone Campbell, executive director of NETWORK, a Roman Catholic social justice group. She did not speak long - about seven minutes. Her delivery was not particularly powerful. But with the moral authority of her calling, she did something that has sorely needed doing for some weeks now. She rebuked "I built that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Singing nuns have always proved irresistible. There was the Belgian sensation who made "Dominique" a chart-topper in the 1960s, Today, there's Sister Cristina Scuccia, the Sicilian star of Italian TV and YouTube who belts out Alicia Keys songs, and the sweet-voiced, Missouri-based Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, whose CDs of Gregorian chant are best-sellers. And coming to Baltimore this week are some very vocal nuns who get into the habit of shaking up church services at Queen of Angels Cathedral in Philadelphia with the help of high-voltage songs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
A panel of Roman Catholic priests and others in church life faced an audience of lively fifth graders Thursday, offering snippets of their personal history histories and the motivation for their career choices. But many children were so unfamiliar with a nun's habit and veil that several directed remarks to "the lady in the blue dress. " "We have regular teachers, not nuns," said Craig Kelly, a student at St. Ursula School in Parkville who attended a conference Thursday at Notre Dame of Maryland University.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
A campaign to canonize Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange, above, a founder of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Catholic order of black nuns, will be announced this weekend. Rome has permitted the Baltimore archdiocese to begin making a case for the Cuban-born nun. Story, A6.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | April 27, 1995
An article Thursday incorrectly reported that a former Archbishop Keough High School student was undergoing therapy for alleged sex abuse by the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell, the school's chaplain, when she implicated him in the unsolved 1969 slaying of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik. Phillip G. Dantes, her lawyer, said she was not in therapy when she recalled memories of her association with the priest.The Sun regrets the errors.After a year pursuing leads here and around the country, Baltimore County Police have returned the unsolved, 25-year-old slaying of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik to the "cold case" file where it had rested for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996
Impossible Industrial Action will present the world premiere of Polish playwright Stanislaw Witkiewicz's "The Madman and the Nun" at the Theatre Project beginning WednesdaySet in a mental hospital, the play focuses on a novice nun assigned to help rehabilitate a mad poet. To create an evening of what Witkiewicz called "pure form," director Tony Tsendeas has come up with a multimedia production concept that includes slide projections and an original score.Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, through April 28. Tickets are $14. Call (410)
NEWS
By PATRICK ERCOLANO | April 1, 1995
Maybe it was a blessing in disguise. My eighth-grade grammar teacher at St. Mary's parochial school in Govans, Sister Mary Annina, died of a heart ailment three weeks ago at the age of 84 -- a few days before a wave of media reports about a local Catholic high school that had been screening a porn-laced video for the tutelage of its students.Better that Sister Annina never heard the stories. If her heart hadn't already done her in, the news of a blue movie at a school run by nuns probably would have killed her.Sister Annina (pronounced uh-NEE-nuh)
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
A reprint of the famous Sistine Chapel scene between God and Adam is framed on a wall of Elizabeth Ann Murphy's small Cockeysville apartment. Nothing stands between the two of them: no priests or nuns, no bishop, and most of all, no lawyers. Just the supreme hand of the Creator and that of Man, trying so hard to touch.The picture, one of her favorite images, symbolizes the importance of religion in her life. And it expresses all the trauma and futility the earthly world has placed between Ms. Murphy and the Catholic church since middle-school teacher John Joseph Merzbacher raped and abused her 20 years ago.No matter that Merzbacher was sentenced to life in prison yesterday, by a judge who said he deserved "as much punishment as he could get" for his crimes.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
It's a war that seemingly ended a long time ago, being fought in the most unlikely of places: contraception, at homes for the elderly run by an order of Roman Catholic nuns. The Little Sisters of the Poor, with a house in Catonsvlle, are fighting the provision in the Affordable Care Act requiring employee health insurance plans to provide birth control coverage. The sisters won a last-minute injunction to keep from getting fined for refusing to comply with the law when it took effect on New Year's Day. Never mind that the sisters can easily exempt themselves from paying a single penny for anyone's birth control, which they say violates their church's teachings.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor made a reasonable decision when, on New Year's Eve, she temporarily blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Act's contraception coverage mandate in a case brought by a religious order of nuns that operates homes for the poor and elderly in Catonsville and elsewhere. It certainly doesn't hurt to wait a few days and hear the government's argument for immediate implementation. But the 11th hour drama doesn't change the fact that the contraceptive coverage requirement is good policy, and the mechanism for groups like the Little Sisters of the Poor to avoid violating their religious tenets is reasonable.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
A group of Catonsville nuns who claimed that the new federal health care law's contraceptive coverage requirement would violate their religious beliefs are actually exempt from the mandate, a U.S. district judge concluded Friday. The Little Sisters of the Poor operates St. Martin's Home in Catonsville and about 30 other homes for the poor and elderly across the country, including in Colorado, where the federal lawsuit was filed on their behalf in September by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
In a case that could have implications for ministries across the country, a Catonsville-based group of nuns who care for the elderly poor are awaiting a federal judge's decision on whether it must comply with the federal health care law's requirement to provide free contraceptive coverage for lay employees. The Little Sisters of the Poor say they could face substantial IRS fines beginning in January if they don't comply with the rule. While the federal health care law exempts churches, the Little Sisters of the Poor don't fall under the government's definition of a religious employer - and providing free access to birth control violates their religious vows, they say. The Catholic Church teaches that artificial contraception is immoral.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
On a typical day, as you head north on Dulaney Valley Road just above Interstate 695, you might be speeding to outrun the tailgater behind you, glorying in that steal you just scored at the nearby Towson Town Center or just trying to make Jarrettsville in time for dinner. If so, you might miss an invitation to history. Turn left at a little white sign south of Seminary Avenue, cruise up a wooded lane and park near a fieldstone mansion, and you'll find yourself on the 27 quiet acres that serve as home to Baltimore Carmel, which descends from the first community of religious women formed in the 13 colonies.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Moments after Gov. Martin O'Malley urged lawmakers that "it is time to repeal the death penalty in Maryland and replace it with life without parole" during his State of the State speech Wednesday, a Roman Catholic nun famous for her repeal work resumed the effort to secure the votes. Sister Helen Prejean, whose autobiography "Dead Man Walking" detailing her work with death row inmates was made into a movie, planned to meet Wednesday with undecided lawmakers. She said she was pleased that O'Malley had created a simple framework that cast the death penalty as an ineffective tool that isn't worth using.
NEWS
April 26, 2005
Sister Marie Ernestine Harkness, a Franciscan nun and nurse, died of complications from multiple sclerosis Thursday at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 83. Born Caroline Rose Harkness in Sellersville, Pa., where she had her nursing education, she entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1944 and took the name Marie Ernestine. In the 1950s, she joined the staff of what is now St. Joseph Medical Center as a pediatric supervisor and later headed the hospital's central supply department.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
Long before the White House ordered an investigation into alleged CIA involvement in violence in Guatemala, Sister Diana Ortiz began an investigation of her own.Sister Diana, an Ursuline nun from Grants, N.M., says she was kidnapped, tortured and raped in 1989 by three uniformed Guatemalan security men. She says they took orders from an American.She has filed a civil suit in the U.S. District Court in Boston against Gen. Hector Gramajo, Guatemala's defense minister at the time, under a law that applies to human rights abuses of American citizens abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | November 1, 2012
In a season full of psychological terrors, this episode used the ferocity of nature to induce fear into the show's characters. The newly possessed Sister Mary Eunice foreshadowed what was to come. “There's a storm coming Sister Jude…A big, fat storm.”    Luckily this episode aired after the arrival of superstorm Sandy so that viewers could watch the big, fat, fictional storm. American Horror Story fans also were treated to a drunken Sister Jude and Sister Mary Eunice's best impression of Shelley the nymphomaniac.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 9, 2012
- Let's talk about the other speech. No, not Bill Clinton's 48-minute stemwinder to the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night that was so mesmerizing even Republicans praised it. Instead, let's offer a little nod of affirmation for Sister Simone Campbell, executive director of NETWORK, a Roman Catholic social justice group. She did not speak long - about seven minutes. Her delivery was not particularly powerful. But with the moral authority of her calling, she did something that has sorely needed doing for some weeks now. She rebuked "I built that.
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