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Nuisance Abatement

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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
The city state's attorney's office has filed civil lawsuits to evict five people accused of dealing drugs and endangering families in the historic Northeast Baltimore neighborhood of Armistead Gardens.It is the latest effort by law enforcement officials to rid Baltimore of the drug menace by using the nuisance abatement law, under which the city can force accused drug dealers from their homes.Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier scheduled a news conference today in Armistead Gardens to announce the lawsuits and bring attention to the initiative resulting in hundreds of evictions citywide.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
In a blow to civic groups trying to rid their neighborhoods of drug dealers, the state's highest court ruled yesterday that city officials cannot bulldoze buildings just because they are obvious fronts for narcotics sales. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that nuisance abatement laws, though written broadly, "would not extend to the destruction of a building which is used for unlawful activity." The opinion prevents the city from razing the Springhill Market in Park Heights, which a District Court judge ordered demolished two years ago after complaints from police and residents that the sparsely stocked store was a virtual shopping center for illegal substances.
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NEWS
August 31, 1995
People who live in neighborhoods where drug deals are as common as the sight of an MTA bus usually know who is selling dope and where they're selling it. The faces may change, but not the houses and apartments where crack addicts fire up their pipes and dealers set up shop.Police can't arrest the buildings that are magnets for drug abusers and their suppliers. But community groups, working with the police, can make greater use of Maryland's nuisance-abatement law. That legal tool could have as much impact on some neighborhoods as the police's recent drug sweeps.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2000
After raiding a Lothian man's house this week for the fifth time since 1997, county police have decided on another approach -- asking the state to designate the house on Mount Zion Marlboro Road as a "drug nuisance" and take control of the property. The house is owned by Daniel Lee Riggs, 39, who has been convicted twice on drug charges. He is scheduled to be tried in May on drug possession and distribution charges stemming from a December raid, in which police say they seized cocaine and cash.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
The Baltimore state's attorney office has filed lawsuits against two East Baltimore property owners as part of an effort to target landlords who allow their buildings to be used for drug activity.Notices were posted at 715 E. Preston St. and 812 N. Chapel St. yesterday afternoon. The notices state that the state's attorney will seek court orders requiring the landlords to evict tenants and submit plans to the court that will ensure the properties no longer will be used for drug activity. Officials said they plan to target 200 properties in the Police Department's Eastern District by July 12.The suits were filed under the state's Nuisance Abatement Law, which gives courts broad authority to order landlords to eliminate drug activity on their property.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2000
After raiding a Lothian man's house this week for the fifth time since 1997, county police have decided on another approach -- asking the state to designate the house on Mount Zion Marlboro Road as a "drug nuisance" and take control of the property. The house is owned by Daniel Lee Riggs, 39, who has been convicted twice on drug charges. He is scheduled to be tried in May on drug possession and distribution charges stemming from a December raid, in which police say they seized cocaine and cash.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
In a blow to civic groups trying to rid their neighborhoods of drug dealers, the state's highest court ruled yesterday that city officials cannot bulldoze buildings just because they are obvious fronts for narcotics sales. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that nuisance abatement laws, though written broadly, "would not extend to the destruction of a building which is used for unlawful activity." The opinion prevents the city from razing the Springhill Market in Park Heights, which a District Court judge ordered demolished two years ago after complaints from police and residents that the sparsely stocked store was a virtual shopping center for illegal substances.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | November 9, 1995
Sean Roberts is realistic about his Armistead Gardens community of small rowhouses in a semi-isolated section of northeast Baltimore."It certainly isn't the best neighborhood, but it's not the worst," Mr. Roberts said yesterday as the city's police commissioner stood nearby. "We don't want it to get any worse." He said the community is threatened by a budding drug trade and is hoping that a legal crackdown by Baltimore police and prosecutors can nip the problem.Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier and Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy held a news conference at the 1,500-home complex yesterday to announce the filing of civil lawsuits against five residents under the state's nuisance abatement law.Mr.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Three months ago, Fayette and Mount streets was known as a "drug corner." As in so many other drug-plagued areas, dealers and sellers did business in the open -- even midday, with lookouts keeping watch for police.Residents have worked for several months to rid the corner of that seedy image. They asked the dealers to leave and using the 1991 nuisance abatement law, they obtained court orders to seal two houses where drugs were sold.Now, the Franklin Square Community Garden brings life to the corner where drugs once brought the specter of death.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Park Heights grocery store that police called a center for drug traffic must be razed within 30 days, a Baltimore Circuit judge ruled yesterday, allowing the city for the first time to exercise its nuisance abatement powers to demolish a building.The ruling by Administrative Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan upheld a District Court decision in March ordering Allen B. Becker of Owings Mills to tear down Springhill Market, at 2900 Springhill Ave. Becker has until Oct. 1 to clear the site or post $100,000 bond to stay the decision and appeal.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
As the state's highest court heard a challenge yesterday to a District Court order to raze a Northwest Baltimore store, more than two dozen Park Heights activists declared victory over the landlord of the grocery, which was deemed a drug hub and closed last year. Though the Court of Appeals will not issue a ruling for months, and three judges questioned whether demolishing the building was overkill, community leaders said they made their point. "We want to send a message for other landlords that we won't stand for just anything," said community organizer Henry Thompson.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Park Heights grocery store that police called a center for drug traffic must be razed within 30 days, a Baltimore Circuit judge ruled yesterday, allowing the city for the first time to exercise its nuisance abatement powers to demolish a building.The ruling by Administrative Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan upheld a District Court decision in March ordering Allen B. Becker of Owings Mills to tear down Springhill Market, at 2900 Springhill Ave. Becker has until Oct. 1 to clear the site or post $100,000 bond to stay the decision and appeal.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | November 9, 1995
Sean Roberts is realistic about his Armistead Gardens community of small rowhouses in a semi-isolated section of northeast Baltimore."It certainly isn't the best neighborhood, but it's not the worst," Mr. Roberts said yesterday as the city's police commissioner stood nearby. "We don't want it to get any worse." He said the community is threatened by a budding drug trade and is hoping that a legal crackdown by Baltimore police and prosecutors can nip the problem.Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier and Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy held a news conference at the 1,500-home complex yesterday to announce the filing of civil lawsuits against five residents under the state's nuisance abatement law.Mr.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
The city state's attorney's office has filed civil lawsuits to evict five people accused of dealing drugs and endangering families in the historic Northeast Baltimore neighborhood of Armistead Gardens.It is the latest effort by law enforcement officials to rid Baltimore of the drug menace by using the nuisance abatement law, under which the city can force accused drug dealers from their homes.Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier scheduled a news conference today in Armistead Gardens to announce the lawsuits and bring attention to the initiative resulting in hundreds of evictions citywide.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
People who live in neighborhoods where drug deals are as common as the sight of an MTA bus usually know who is selling dope and where they're selling it. The faces may change, but not the houses and apartments where crack addicts fire up their pipes and dealers set up shop.Police can't arrest the buildings that are magnets for drug abusers and their suppliers. But community groups, working with the police, can make greater use of Maryland's nuisance-abatement law. That legal tool could have as much impact on some neighborhoods as the police's recent drug sweeps.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Christina Asquith and Gregory P. Kane and Christina Asquith,Sun Staff Writers | August 6, 1995
The people in the 1000 block of Friendship Lane in West River used to say the area felt more like a busy parking lot than a neighborhood. Then the state ordered Wilbur Morgan's broken-down home destroyed."
NEWS
July 7, 1995
In some neighborhoods, where is as important as who to junkies looking for that next fix or hit. Would-be crack customers who might not know whom to see frequently do know where to go. Police can't arrest these buildings that have become magnets for drug abusers and their suppliers. But there is a legal tool that, if used more frequently in cooperation with community groups, could have as much impact on some neighborhoods as the police department's current drug sweeps.That tool is Maryland's Nuisance Abatement law, which was enacted in 1991 but not used much in Baltimore until now. The law allows lawsuits to be filed against the owners of known drug houses.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
As the state's highest court heard a challenge yesterday to a District Court order to raze a Northwest Baltimore store, more than two dozen Park Heights activists declared victory over the landlord of the grocery, which was deemed a drug hub and closed last year. Though the Court of Appeals will not issue a ruling for months, and three judges questioned whether demolishing the building was overkill, community leaders said they made their point. "We want to send a message for other landlords that we won't stand for just anything," said community organizer Henry Thompson.
NEWS
July 7, 1995
In some neighborhoods, where is as important as who to junkies looking for that next fix or hit. Would-be crack customers who might not know whom to see frequently do know where to go. Police can't arrest these buildings that have become magnets for drug abusers and their suppliers. But there is a legal tool that, if used more frequently in cooperation with community groups, could have as much impact on some neighborhoods as the police department's current drug sweeps.That tool is Maryland's Nuisance Abatement law, which was enacted in 1991 but not used much in Baltimore until now. The law allows lawsuits to be filed against the owners of known drug houses.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
The Baltimore state's attorney office has filed lawsuits against two East Baltimore property owners as part of an effort to target landlords who allow their buildings to be used for drug activity.Notices were posted at 715 E. Preston St. and 812 N. Chapel St. yesterday afternoon. The notices state that the state's attorney will seek court orders requiring the landlords to evict tenants and submit plans to the court that will ensure the properties no longer will be used for drug activity. Officials said they plan to target 200 properties in the Police Department's Eastern District by July 12.The suits were filed under the state's Nuisance Abatement Law, which gives courts broad authority to order landlords to eliminate drug activity on their property.
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